Monthly Archives: November 2016

Popular ISA funds #business #hosting


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This month’s ISA investment ideas

Past performance is not a guide to future returns. All investments can go down as well as up in value, so you could get back less than you invest. Yields are variable and not guaranteed. Tax rules can change and the value of any tax shelter depends on individual circumstances. Hargreaves Lansdown Multi-Manager funds are managed by our sister company Hargreaves Lansdown Fund Managers.

Unsure where to invest?

Still not sure where to invest? Whether you’re an experienced investor or just starting out we provide a range of portfolios to help you select the right investments to fit your financial goals, at the level of risk you are happy with. Select one of the options below to get started. If you are unsure of the suitability of your investment please seek advice .

Leave it to an expert

Leave it to an expert

Simple and expertly managed, our ready-made portfolios take the hassle out of investing.

Simple and expertly managed, our ready-made portfolios take the hassle out of investing.

Whether investing for income or growth, you can choose from a range of portfolios depending on your aims and attitude to risk.

Whether investing for income or growth, you can choose from a range of portfolios depending on your aims and attitude to risk.

Help me choose

Help to get you started

Help you get started

Master portfolios are designed to help you get started with investing. There are five example portfolios depending on your aims and attitude to risk.

Master portfolios are designed to help you get started with investing. There are five examples portfolios depending on your aims and attitude to risk.

While each fund is professionally managed, the overall responsibility for managing the holdings rests with you

While each fund is professionally managed, the overall responsibility for managing the holdings rests with you

Build your own investment portfolio

Build your own investment portfolio

Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between income and accumulation units?

The type of unit you hold determines how any income generated from the fund’s underlying investments is treated.

With income units, income is paid out to fund holders as cash. This could provide the investor with an income stream or the cash could be reinvested to buy additional units.

With accumulation units income is retained within the fund and reinvested, increasing the price of the units. Generally, for investors who wish to reinvest income, accumulation units offer a more convenient and cost-effective way of doing so.

What is the difference between ‘inclusive’ and ‘unbundled’ funds?

In the past most investors who held funds, such as unit trusts and OEICs, paid a single ongoing charge to the manager of their chosen funds. This charge often included an element of commission which the fund manager shared with brokers, such as Hargreaves Lansdown, to help pay for their service. We call these funds ‘inclusive’ funds.

Recent FCA rule changes mean that when investors purchase a fund any commission must be rebated to the investor. As a result of the FCA’s new rules, fund management groups have launched new versions of their funds with lower ongoing charges, which do not include any commission. We call these funds ‘unbundled’ funds.

Once you have opened an account, it is straightforward and secure to place a deal. Please ensure you have read the fund’s Key Investor Information Document or Key Features first which is available from the individual fund factsheets on the website.

1. Log in or call our experienced dealers

Log in to your secure online account or call our experienced dealers on 0117 980 9800 .

2. Select the account in which you wish to deal

Select either the Fund & Share Account, Stocks & Shares ISA or SIPP.

3. Choose your investment and deal value

Find your fund online and enter the value you’re looking to invest. Alternatively, provide your dealer with these details by telephone. When dealing online, you will also need to enter your trading password.

The details of the deal will be provided for you to check. Confirm you’re happy with the fund name and value to be invested and the deal is done. We will send you a contract note either by post or you can download it online – whichever you prefer.

A fund is an investment that pools together the money from many individuals. Fund managers then use it to invest in a wide range of shares and/or bonds. Each investor is issued units, which represent a portion of the holdings of the fund.

Funds are popular with investors because they offer access to a ready-made investment portfolio run by an expert in their field. You can normally invest from £100 as a lump sum or £25 per month, and get instant access to a diversified portfolio for a much lower cost than purchasing the individual investments yourself.

The value of investments can go down in value as well as up, so you could get back less than you invest. It is therefore important that you understand the risks and commitments . This website aims to provide information to help you make your own informed decisions. It does not provide personal advice based on your circumstances. If you are unsure of how suitable an investment is for you, please seek personal advice from our Financial Advisers.



Motif – An Online Brokerage Built Around You #new #business


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Check the background of Motif Investing, Inc. on FINRA s BrokerCheck .

Performance of motifs is for informational purposes only and is based on performance of a motif for a one-year period. Past results are not an indicator of future performance. See how we calculate returns .

Investing in securities involves risks, you should be aware of prior to making an investment decision, including the possible loss of principal. An investment in individual stocks, or a collection of stocks focused on a particular theme or idea, such as a motif, may be subject to increased risk of price fluctuation over more diversified holdings due to adverse developments which can affect a particular industry or sector. Investments in ETFs can include those with a narrow or targeted investment strategy and can be subject to similar sector risks than more broadly diversified investments. Motif makes no representation regarding the suitability of a particular investment or investment strategy. You are responsible for all investment decisions you make including understanding the risks involved with your investment strategy.

Motif Capital Management, Inc. is an SEC-registered investment adviser and a separate, wholly-owned subsidiary of Motif Investing, Inc. a registered broker-dealer and member SIPC.

©2016 Motif Investing, Inc. All rights reserved. Build Id: Master.204



Business Card Magnets #small #business #assistance


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Only one promo code can be used per order. Savings will be reflected in your shopping cart. Discounts cannot be applied to shipping and processing, taxes, design services, previous purchases or products on the Vistaprint Promotional Products site, unless otherwise specified. Discount prices on digital products are valid for initial billing cycle only. Additional charges may apply for shipping and processing, and taxes, unless otherwise specified. Free offers only valid on the lowest quantity of each product and not valid on more than 2 items per order.

Promo code has been applied:

Enter your TV/Radio code or another promo code: Have a different promo code?

Only one code may be used per order.

Have a promo code.

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Have a different promo code.

Magnetic Business Cards

25 starting at $10.00

Make your business stick with customers.

  • Add your company logo, images and personalized text
  • Customize colors, font, text and more.
  • Add your name, logo and contact information.

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Business Cards: Design – Print Custom Business Cards #business #models


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Avery WePrint Business Cards

Ordered business cards. Love Avery design tool. The cards turned out wonderful. I had them print and they look amazing. Price was competitive too. Google Trusted Store Review (June 4, 2016)

Easy to create business cards that included my own image and text. Quality is nice. Google Trusted Store Review (April 30, 2016)

I received an email from them with a layout problem. They corrected it, printed it and shipped before I had a chance to respond! The cards were perfect, just how I had hoped they would turn out. Google Trusted Store Review (April 24, 2016)

The quality of the finished product from Avery WePrint was awesome, the design tool was easy to use and the customer service rep was very helpful with my questions about production/shipping deadlines. Will definitely use again. Google Trusted Store Review (December 14, 2015)

Business cards looked professional – good quality material and crisp color printing! Google Trusted Store Review (November 8, 2015)

* Flat rate shipping offer applies to economy shipping only. If another shipping method is selected, charges may apply. Offer applies only to orders shipped to
the United States and Puerto Rico. Offer subject to change.



How to choose the right business laptop #business #cards #design


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Best laptops for business 2016: Best laptops for UK business, choosing from Windows laptops vs Macbooks vs Chromebooks vs tablets

What is the best laptop for business? We find the best laptops for business 2016. Best laptops from Windows laptops vs Macbooks vs Chromebooks vs tablets. Advice on buying laptops for your business. (See also: 8 best powerful laptops for business .)

1. Best laptops for business: Budget Windows laptop

Almost every business will plump for a budget Windows lappy. and almost every business is right to do so. For a little over 200 you can pick up a perfectly serviceable, no frills notebook that will run all Windows software and connect to the web. Basically, it will do what you need it to do, without looking sexy. Potential down sides include weight and heft, life away from the mains. Cheap laptops don’t tend to have great battery life. Also you will need security software, and beware a cheap display that reflects the strip lights of your local Starbucks.

2. Best laptop for business: Ultrabook

Like a budget laptop, only better. And more expensive. Ultrabook is an Intel term for a thin-and-light Windows laptop that offers powerful performance and true portability. Other features might include a touchscreen, or tablet functionality. Ultrabooks offer all of the advantages of any Windows laptops, and more. But they are not cheap. In fact, at this price you may as well plump for a Macbook.

3. Best laptops for business: Macbook

Macbooks are what Ultrabooks are templated on. Sleek, portable, powerful. expensive. But generally great. There is no nicer laptop to use than a Macbook Pro. No more portable laptop than a Macbook Air. And running OS X means you have less to worry about on the security front. Down sides? Well price is one. Lack of Windows compatibility the other. But if you must have a Windows laptop, and price is not a major consideration, you can always run Windows on your Macbook.

New MacBooks in 2016: Podcast discussion

4. Best laptops for business: Chromebook

The joker in the pack. Chromebooks are laptops that run Google’s Chrome OS. In essence, they use Google Docs, Gmail and other Google tools instead of Windows or Mac software. You can use them when offline, but really they need a regular connection to the web to work. But Chromebooks are super cheap, as well as stylish and powerful. And there are no real security worries. Just don’t use a Chromebook if you need to use Windows, Office or any other Microsoft software. (Or games.) (For more, see: Review: Dell Chromebook 13 .)

5. Best laptops for business: Linux laptop

Another option if you can escape the world of Windows or OS X is Linux. A quick Google Shopping search throws up multiple laptops from the likes of Lenovo, HP and Acer that run on a Linux OS. Linux OSes vary, but in general the open source software is similar to Windows in look, feel and functionality. And being open source it can be tweaked to suit your business’ needs. There is no software licence fee, so the same hardware is often cheaper running Linux that it is Windows or OS X. And you don’t have the same security needs as you do in Windows. But compatiblity is an issue, with both software and other devices. Choice is limited. And you will get funny looks off your colleagues.

6. Best laptops for business: tablet

Microsoft would have you believe that the Surface Pro is the tablet that can replace your laptop. Apple makes similar claims about the iPad Pro. And there are myriad Windows tablets trying to squeeze in to the space. The truth is that if your major concern is portability, the Surface Pro in particular is a stunning device. Just expect to get what you pay for, and understand that the best laptop for using on your lap will always be. a laptop. (See also: iPad Pro vs Surface Pro for business .)

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A Rant About Asking People if They Are “Busy” – Red Hot

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A Rant About Asking People if They Are “Busy”

A Rant About Asking People if They Are “Busy”

I have a request that will help you and your fellow business owners….

Stop asking people if they are busy to see how they are.

We ask people this as if them responding with a “yes” is a good thing?

I don t know anyone who truly wants to feel busy. “Busy” normally goes along with feeling over-worked, tired and stressed out, it usually means not being relaxed and surviving on adrenaline. I don’t know anyone that really enjoys those feelings on an ongoing basis (and I certainly don’t like it either).

I do like to feel challenged though. I do like to feel that I m in demand. I do like to feel that I have a good flow of business to keep me profitable. I like to feel that I’ve got things under control and be relaxed about it (even when I’m working hard).

To me, Busy is a dirty four letter word. We are trained from an early age that busy is a great definition of success Because if we re busy then we must be successful, right? It s not true though. Busy is NOT a sign of success. Busy might mean that we have a lot of clients or work on, but it’s very easy to be busy yet not be profitable. And it s easy to be busy and profitable and still not be happy!

In my observation from coaching hundreds of business owners most are too busy. Their business runs them. So a better question might be How s business? or How s everything working out?” Let’s break the curse of ‘busy being a good thing in business.



Investment Ideas #small #business #consultant


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Investment Ideas

[1] Based on the 30-year calendar year returns of Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index as of 12/19/2013

Views and opinions expressed are for informational purposes only and do not constitute a recommendation by GSAM to buy, sell, or hold any security. Views and opinions are current as of the date of this page and may be subject to change, they should not be construed as investment advice.

This information discusses general market activity, industry or sector trends, or other broad-based economic, market or political conditions and should not be construed as research or investment advice. This material has been prepared by GSAM and is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research (GIR). It was not prepared in compliance with applicable provisions of law designed to promote the independence of financial analysis and is not subject to a prohibition on trading following the distribution of financial research. The views and opinions expressed may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. Investors are urged to consult with their financial advisors before buying or selling any securities. This information may not be current and GSAM has no obligation to provide any updates or changes.

A summary prospectus, if available, or a Prospectus for the Fund containing more information may be obtained from your authorized dealer or from Goldman, Sachs Co. by calling (retail – 1-800-526-7384) (institutional – 1-800-621-2550). Please consider a fund’s objectives, risks, and charges and expenses, and read the summary prospectus, if available, and the Prospectus carefully before investing. The summary prospectus, if available, and the Prospectus contains this and other information about the Fund.



Things You Understand If You’re The Busy Friend #business #profile


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Things You Understand If You’re The Busy Friend

We hear ya.

Are you chronically busy? Do you go to school and hold a job (or several)? Are you overly involved on campus? Do you have a semblance of a social life? Are you constantly having to prioritize and re-prioritize your to-do list? Do you have a tendency to overextend yourself? Do you sometimes feel like your friends just don’t understand? Are you The Busy Friend?

We hear ya. The following is a list of some of the things that your fellow Busy Friends can identify with. If you’re not The Busy Friend, hopefully this list gives you some insights into the mind of The Busy Friend in your life.

1. Scheduling everything. I mean, everything. You forget to schedule cushion time for a bathroom break? Bummer. Your whole day is thrown off.

2. You have been so deprived of purely social interactions that when you finally do make it to that hang-out you scheduled two weeks ago and your friends are busy playing “Candy Crush” instead of being super present in this awesome, once-in-a-month quality friendship moment, you get unreasonably angry.

3. Or the opposite. You finally have a moment to chill with friends, but it is only going to last so long and you’re the one too busy for the present. Remember how you haven’t called your grandma in three years? The to-do list you made seven minutes ago needs updating. You have not casually scrolled your Instagram/Facebook etc. allllll day. If you’ve been there, you know what I mean.

4. When you explain how busy you are, and people tell you to “just do less”, and you’re like “I CANNOT JUST DO LESS. THIS IS MY LIFE. I DO THIS MUCH. THIS IS HOW MUCH I DO” and they still don’t get it. I mean, sure, you could maybe cut out your one hobby that allows you to be a sane and functioning human. And yeah, you could probably eat more top ramen and less actual food, saving on the amount of hours spent working and the amount of prep time. Sure, you could spend less time sleeping – who needs a solid 4 hours anyways?

5. When you have a sudden opening in your schedule and become the most spontaneous person. You’ve got 27 free minutes and you’re up for anything. Where da crew?

6 .You calculate the exact amount of minutes you will be able to sleep if you fall asleep now. How many REM cycles is that? 1.5? Awesome. If anyone interrupts your precious sleep, they might as well have woken a hibernating bear.

7 .When Friday rolls around you can do nothing but fall into bed in exhaustion. Cue comments from friends about how you’re totes antisocial and why don’t you ever go out anymore.

If you can identify with more than a few of these, you may just be The Busy Friend. Maybe it’s time to cut back on a few of your extracurriculars; maybe it’s time to start slimming down your friend group to the people who really matter to you. Trust me, I know the struggle of having to limit your activities and prioritize your passions. But even just making a small change can have a big impact on your schedule, energy level and social life.

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10 big investment ideas for 2016 #business #proposal #sample


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10 big investment ideas for 2016

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It’s time to fire up the interneuronal connections and carve out 10 big ideas for 2016.

Asian nation

My first offering is that Australia will likely become an Asian nation in its ethnic orientation. Apologies to the xenophobes, but it’s happening under your nose. An incredible 28 per cent of Australia’s population (or 6.6 million people) were born overseas – the highest in 120 years. During the last census a remarkable 12 per cent of Australians said they had Asian ancestry.

In Sydney and Melbourne, 19 per cent and 18 per cent, respectively, of residents are Asian. In Sydney regions like Parramatta and Ryde, the Asian share of the population is as high as 34 per cent and 33 per cent, respectively. China and India have overtaken the UK as Australia’s biggest source of new migrants, collectively accounting for 35 per cent of the intake in 2013-14.

The idea of Australia stealthily yet ineluctably becoming an Asian nation is a big deal: it will reinforce our unique antipodal trading position and powerful role as a politically stable economic conduit between east and west; it will help improve our cultural commonalities with major regional actors like China, India and Indonesia (mitigating geopolitical hazards); and it should serve as a source of innovation, productivity and growth, just as the influx of ambitious European migrants did after World War II.

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Bank returns on equity will fall

Idea number two is that the major banks’ returns on equity (RoEs) are inevitably going to fall from around 15 per cent towards their 11 per cent cost of equity as result of the banking system becoming a highly competitive and level playing field. While this process may take five years or more, it should mean that rather than trading at an unusually high two times book value, the majors will price at circa one times. If I’m right, there is much downside to current valuations, which is a proposition reinforced by analysts’ crazy forecasts that bad and doubtful debt charges will stay around 30-year lows.

In five years the majors will have ceded the competitive advantages that fuelled their world-beating RoEs. Rather than carrying 25 per cent more leverage than rivals, they will end up having less leverage and more equity capital in the funding mix. Combined with the fact that smaller banks tend not to source as much funding in the dearer wholesale bond markets – underwriting assets with cheaper deposits that are now a government-guaranteed (and more stable) funding source – I believe the majors will wind up having more expensive funding costs. In short, we will migrate to a system where the majors are much safer banks with reduced risks of failure, with the trade-off of lower returns on equity than competitors that have loftier leverage and lower funding costs. There should, therefore, be an economic role reversal between the big four and their rivals.

Another Macquarie Bank?

If the majors are going to become slow-moving, yet bullet-proof, utilities, a third idea is investors should look for superior returns from more fleet-footed alternatives that are not saddled with the financial baggage of being too-big-to-fail. One day we will eventually see another Nicholas Moore who creates a new Macquarie Bank with a much skinnier 50 per cent dividend payout ratio (compared to the majors’ 80 per cent pay-out policies) that retains earnings to support investments in innovative and entrepreneurial opportunities. Macquarie has done a fabulous job of continuously reinventing itself to maintain growth and studiously avoided allocating too much capital to competing in the majors’ commodity markets.

On this note, the majors will likely lose significant market share in home loans to regional banks that for the first time will be able to compete effectively with them on price without crushing their returns. Rather than being price setters, the majors will become price takers and have to give back the recent rate hikes they have foisted on borrowers to compensate for expanding equity funding costs or suffer market share losses. This will compel them back into the less contested business lending space, which will lubricate credit to companies. Indeed, I think the majors’ balance-sheet splits between residential and business loans will revert back to the 40:60 levels before the 1991 recession.

Our forecasts for double-digit house price growth in 2013 and 2014, and high single-digit growth in 2015, were spot on. My fourth idea is that there will be no imminent housing collapse, and the price of our bricks and mortar will again climb in 2016, albeit at a much slower pace of around 1 to 2 times income growth. I maintain the view that the market is very expensive (15 to 25 per cent above fair value) and recently sold my own home. The interest rate hikes that will be the catalyst for a sustained Aussie housing correction appear to have been shunted into the distant future.

A fifth idea is that as the US and UK jobless rates (5 and 5.3 per cent respectively) fall towards 3 per cent in 2016 and 2017, wage and consumer price inflation will gradually reanimate. While the Fed will hike in December, central banks will get behind the curve because of their desire to “look through” this reflation.

Fixed-rate bond prices to plummet

This prompts another idea, which is that fixed-rate bond prices will melt as long-term yields rise on the back of financial markets resisting the Fed’s dovish view of the world and acknowledging stubbornly strong inflation data. The existential moment for global central banks will arrive when the break-even inflation rates priced by the bond market begin breaching official inflation targets in a sign that investors no longer think that monetary policy (and so-called nominal growth targeting) is compatible with price stability. Asset allocators need to be short interest rate duration or, if you have to be exposed to this risk, hire a smart duration manager – they can be hard to find. Few people can consistently call rate changes right.

If this base case plays out, my seventh thought is that global equities will face tremendous headwinds as long-term risk-free rates (that is, government bond yields) mean-revert back to some semblance of normality, which means yields 50 per cent to 100 per cent higher than current marks. Recall that the 10-year government bond yield is an essential input as the underpinning for the discount rates in the valuation models for all listed and unlisted equity and real estate markets.

Sell ‘beta’ buy ‘alpha’

This insight furnishes an eighth idea, which is sell equity “beta” and buy “alpha”, as I advocated last year. Aussie shares (beta) have declined over the year to date while market-neutral and long-short hedge funds (alpha) have delivered terrific returns (at least the guys that I invest with have). This dynamic is unlikely to change.

In the more immediate term (over the next, say, one to two years), I like “spread” assets as the search for yield will remain a critical influence over investor behaviour as long as deposits do not offer any material “real” returns above inflation and equities continues to get hammered. One example is major bank subordinated bonds, which currently trade very cheaply on a global basis despite the majors being among the best capitalised banks globally, care of $33 billion of equity origination over the last 12 months. The credit ratings on major banks’ subordinated debt are on par with the senior bonds issued by Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley or Citigroup, and I think there is a decent chance they will get upgraded to the “A” band next year if Standard & Poor’s lifts the majors’ stand-alone credit profiles from “a” to “a+”, as it has signalled it may do.

A final thought is that if the world is once again forced to choose between elevated interest rates and high and volatile inflation, there is a possibility that the value of paper money will atrophy as a credible medium of exchange. This could precipitate a flight to safety in the form of a resurgence in the demand for gold as a hedge against the debasement of money by governments using the printing press to finance their own deficits.



How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #businesses

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Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

How to Invest in Stocks

So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

Swing Trader

A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

Value Investing

A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

Growth Investing

Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

Deciding What to Invest In

You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

Research ETFs

Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

Choose Sectors

Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

Stay Informed

Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

Types of Investments


Bonds

Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

Small-Cap Stocks

Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

Large-Cap Stocks

Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

Penny Stocks

Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

Finding Good Stocks to Buy

Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


Liquidity

It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

Price

Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

Investment Ideas

Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

Warren Buffet

Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

Peter Lynch

Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

Good research pays off

Shut out market noise

Invest for the long term

Philip Fisher

Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

Here are some best performing stocks of 2015: