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10 great start-up business ideas to launch in weeks: Starting a business

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10 great start-up business ideas to launch in weeks

Take a look around you this morning as you drive or catch the train to work.

From the window cleaner who arrives on your street as you close the front door behind you to the coffee cart serving cappuccinos and lattes at the station, the world is full of thriving and profitable small businesses that have been set up for relatively little initial outlay.

These are not ‘clever’ businesses trading on the strength of innovative new products and nor do they require the backing of deep-pocketed investors to get them off the ground. They succeed because their owners are responding to genuine demand for tried and trusted services.

And with a low initial outlay and overheads, many of these small-scale ventures can be profitable within weeks or months and over time provide their owners with a good income.

So how do you get started? Well, to give you an idea of how it’s done, here are 10 great businesses ideas I’ve come across that you can get up and running within weeks.

1. Mopping up – household cleaning

The lower your outlay, the faster you turn a profit and that’s one of the big attractions of launching a domestic cleaning business. For instance Millie Dark, founder of Sussex cleaners, Mrs Muscle started her company with no real investment. “My customers supply all the equipment and cleaning products,” explains Millie.

Millie worked part-time for a few months before advertising in the local press and word-of mouth generated enough work to go full time. Today she employs 12 part-timers. “It’s taken me a couple of years to get that stage,” she says.

2. On cloud K9 – dog walking

A dog walking and pet sitting service can also be set up with minimal investment. For instance, when Catherine Cleaver started her business – Catherine’s Pet Services – all she needed was £500 for a couple of garden kennels.

Catherine placed a few ads in shop windows. Over time – and with the help of word of mouth recommendation and ads in the local magazine – what started as a part-time activity became a full time job.

“I was earning enough to live on after about three months,” she says “and after about a year I felt I had a sustainable business.” She succeeds by offering a range of services, including dog walking, pet visits and boarding.

3. Cutting it – home hairdressing

Many hairdressers dream of starting their own businesses but are deterred by the cost of renting a salon. Setting up a home visit service can be an ideal way forward.

There is a significant outlay on brushes, tongs, dryers, mirrors and products. “You’re talking several thousands rather than hundreds,” says Ela Lapus, founder of Home Hair and Make Up.

“And customers expect to see the same products they find in a salon. Customers will also expect evidence of recognised skills. I have Level 2 and Level 3.”

The key to profitable success is effective marketing. Hairdressers can use local ads and web directories to publicise their services. Social Media can also be effective. “About 50% of my work comes through Facebook,” says Ela.

Once the initial investment had been made Ela was able to start earning immediately but the present business, operating across several counties has taken a number of years to build.

4. A caffeine hit – mobile coffee bar

We’re a coffee hungry nation and beyond Starbucks and Costa there are thousands of small mobile barista carts selling lattes on the go.

“A coffee maker will cost about £5,000,” says Beth Baxter, co-founder of Camper Cafe. “And then you have to pay for the cart or a van to put it in.”

Prices vary but carts or trailers can cost anything between £5,000 and £10,000. The founders of Camper Cafe were given a Volkswagen van which they kitted out to become their visual signature. Training is an additional cost. Courses for coffee making can be had for between £50 and £200.

Finding pitches is the most challenging aspect as you are often in competition with other vendors. “It took us a year to find out about the market,” says Beth. “After that we took off.”

5. Juiced perfect – mobile juice bar

The rise of coffee carts has been matched by the emergence of juice bars in markets, shopping malls, public thoroughfares and events. The set-up costs are similar to coffee in terms of equipment and training.

6. Bright idea – window cleaning

If you have a car with a roof rack you can start a window cleaning business for a few hundred pounds (bucket, ladder, clothes, etc).

Alternatively you might invest in high pressure pure water sprays, water tanks (around £2,000) and a van to carry them (say £15,000). This is increasingly common.

The challenge then is to build a customer base and that tends to be up close and personal. “Initially the most effective way to do it is to knock on doors and ask,” says Guy Lupton, co-founder of Khameleon Window Cleaning Ltd.

Building a solid base can take time. “We spent about three years of trial and error to get it right,” says Guy. “We’ve been going about five.”

However, when you do get it right the business can grow rapidly. “We still knock on doors,” says Guy. “But we get a lot more business by word of mouth.”

7. Showing drive – ‘Man in a Van’ business

Advertisements for ‘Man in a Van’ and ‘Light Removals’ services are a common sight on shop window advertising boards.

The pre-requisite is a van, probably a Luton-style box van with a tail lift and that’s also the main expense. You’ll need public liability insurance (as is the case for all the businesses listed here). The ongoing costs include petrol, servicing, MOT, and repairs.

The main challenge is building a customer base and most operators use flyers, shop window ads and online directories. Man or woman in a van businesses can be quick to establish but work is required to build a market and perhaps the biggest challenge is getting the pricing right.

8. Highest bidder – an eBay business

Launching an eBay business allows you reach a national and occasionally an international market. You can auction goods or sell at a fixed price.

Most eBay businesses will pay at least £19.99 per month as a subscription fee (rising to £59.99 for a featured shop and £349 for an ‘Anchor Shop’) and on top of that you will pay fees for each auction or fixed price insertion and each sale.

To succeed on eBay you usually have to find goods that can’t be bought elsewhere or offer popular products at knock-down prices. For some it’s a part-time source of pin-money, for others a full-time business. Posters on eBay include Nasty Gal and six years after starting to sell vintage clothing on the auction site it’s now a £60m business .

9. A gem of a business – jewellery and crafts

Many small businesses are based around the skills of their founders. For instance, if you have training as a jeweller or sculptor, an obvious way to sell your work is to market direct to the public via web, craft fairs or through shops.

Tools can cost anything from a few hundred to many thousands of pounds but you can keep costs down by working from a home studio. Ongoing costs include materials, rental at craft fairs (from as little as £20 per day to more than a £1,000).

Jane Faulkner, a jeweller based in Sussex, sells via the web and craft fairs while also having shelf-space in a local co-operative (Billingshurst Creatives) where craftspeople and artists can display their goods in return for taking turns manning the store.

“Craft fairs are my biggest source of income while the shop provides a regular cheque every month,” says Jane. Teaching is also part of the business.

With these revenue streams Jane feels she has a sustainable business, but it has taken around eight years to establish.

10. Snappy work – photography

Photography is another skills-based business. Go to almost any event – from music gigs to vintage car rallies and weddings and you’ll find photographers hard at work.

As Art Hutchins, a freelancer photographer trading as Artseye points out, it’s a business that requires investment in time and money. “Being a serious pro photographer requires a high level of financial investment in good quality equipment and time to acquire the knowledge and skill to use it.”

Starting from scratch would mean buying pro-quality cameras (around £2,000) lenses (£100-£1,000), tripods and lights but many photographers who set up their own businesses will already have acquired some of the equipment over time.

According to Art Hutchins, the best approach is to decide on a target market – in his case small businesses, editorial and family portraits. “The best marketing is word of mouth,” he says.

Very different businesses but all can be started quickly and easily using readily available equipment or existing skills. Importantly most of these businesses take payment either at the point of sale or soon after and that’s great for cashflow.

Demand is there but the key is to market effectively and at the right price.

John Fagan is the head of RBS branch business, England Wales and direct banking. His team work with businesses to build a bigger support network inside the bank and beyond with partners and fellow customers. www.rbsbusinessconnections.co.uk

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The 5 Worst Pieces of Advice for Small Business Owners #business #loans

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Mashable

The 5 Worst Pieces of Advice for Small Business Owners

When you’re starting a business, there’s no shortage of people eager to hand out advice. It seems that everyone, even someone you’ve just met, has an opinion on how you should be developing your product, running your marketing, handling your finances and much more.

I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve met some very smart people and have had great mentors over the years. Their contributions have been invaluable to my success. Yet after launching two companies over two decades, I’ve come across some terrible advice.

Below are the top five bits of advice that I could have done without.

1. “Hire people you know.”

I’ve had countless people tell me that it’s always better to assemble a team of “known quantities” — friends, colleagues or former employees whom you know and trust. But I’ve discovered that for me, the best hiring decisions are based on the specific positions I need to fill at that moment in time. In other words, I need to focus on the specific expertise and skill sets the company needs, rather than trying to piece together how Jill, Sally and Joe will fit into the new business.

In addition, if things aren’t working out between an employee and your company, you need to part ways (and usually, the sooner the better). You may be more reluctant to let friends go, even if you know they aren’t good fits.

2. “There’s no room for you in the market.”

When my husband and I launched a legal document filing company the second time around, the field was quite crowded, with several big names and established players. Many people told us to find a new space because there simply wasn’t room for us to compete.

However, the key to business success doesn’t always hinge on finding a completely empty field; rather, it’s how you define your company and its place in the market. Starbucks wasn’t the first company to sell coffee, but they did revolutionize the coffee shop by selling an experience along with a caffeine fix. Still, numerous boutique coffee shops are able to open and thrive today, even though there’s a Starbucks around the corner.

Rather than struggling to come up with a brand new idea, take a look at your target industry and see where there’s a void to be filled. Figure out the best possible way to fill that need and run with it. You don’t always have to blaze a new trail, but you need to know who you are.

3. “You have to be cheaper than the other guys.”

I admit that my husband and I fell into this pricing trap with our company. We felt that the only way we could compete with the “big guys” was to undercut them on price. So, we dropped our prices. Our business grew, customers were happy, more customers came in, yet we were nearly losing money with every new order.

Many young companies feel the pressure to discount their prices heavily in order to win business. While customer acquisition is important, attracting customers at unsustainable price levels will just result in a race to the bottom. I’ve learned that you’re better off in the long run to focus on how to bring more value to customers, rather than simply slashing your prices. After all, someone will always be able (or willing) to absorb a lower cost than you. You’ll need to find a new way to stand out, and then work as hard as you can to be exceptional in those differentiating areas.

4. “Social media is free.”

Over the past several years, I’ve had people tell me that starting a small business today is much easier than a decade ago, because of all the free marketing on Facebook. Twitter and Yelp. Sure, you don’t have to spend a dime to join Facebook, create a Twitter account or start a blog. But, I think a more apt comparison is that social media is free like a puppy. It may not cost much to bring a shelter puppy home, but from day one, it’s an endless whirlwind of training, toys and treats.

Likewise, social media is far from free once you factor in the blood, sweat and tears it demands. From developing fresh content to keeping up conversations, social media requires nonstop commitment once you start. Unless you consider your time (or the time of your employees) worthless, then there’s a significant cost involved with social media.

5. “You have to spend money to make money.”

This cliché never applied to our business, particularly at the beginning. We set up shop in our apartment and did everything we could to keep expenses down. Sometimes we thought things would be better if we just had the money for X, Y or Z. But it’s risky to think that throwing money at a problem is your silver bullet. Sometimes, creative thinking and strategy work far better than a checkbook.

We had to learn the difference between spending money and investing in the business. Certainly, money can scale a business faster, but only when you spend money on those things that will produce more money in return.

Final Thoughts

People will always give you advice — some good, some bad. The key is to never forget that you are running the show. Other people’s opinions should always be viewed through the context of your own experiences, convictions and value system.

Final decisions are always up to you, so there’s no blaming someone else for bad advice.

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How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps: Starting a

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How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps

With recent figures showing that Brits spent more than £4bn on their beloved pets in 2015, you’d be barking mad to think the recession has impacted on the UK’s pet spend.

Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

Marking a 10% increase on pooch spending from 2010, it’s not only large retailers benefitting, with many entrepreneurs realising there’s opportunities to be had in the pet industry.

The average dog walker now earns 20% more than the average UK salary. so it’s clearly a viable and potentially profitable business opportunity.

Of course you’ll need to have a genuine interest in dogs as well as a good knowledge of the various rules and regulations surrounding the industry – and it’s a fairly business marketplace.

However, with plenty of doting pet owners out there, finding a good niche can still present great opportunities.

Sound interesting? Then read our four simple steps to help you become top dog in the industry.

1. Experience is essential

While it’s not imperative to have a career background with animals, you should at least be confident around dogs and at the very least have experience in walking a family or friend’s pet.

The Kennel Club’s guidelines for people working with dogs advises “strong interpersonal and communication skills”, as well as “a high level of fitness” and, naturally, “an affinity with, and understanding of dogs” for anyone wishing to pursue a career with man’s best friend.

If you’re in need of experience in handling dogs, you might want to consider volunteering at your local kennels or rescue centre. They’ll often house a good range of dogs of various sizes, age and temperament, so you’ll be fit to face whatever comes your way.

Consider attending courses in animal first aid, pet medication or even animal psychology as gaining a diploma or certificate in any of these would showcase your commitment to the dog’s welfare and impress clients.

2. Remember, it’s a business

While any animal lover might feel like they’ve died and gone to doggy heaven, remind yourself that your dog walking business is just that – a business. As such, you’ll need to possess all the regular entrepreneurial skills required for founding and running a successful company.

Having a basic understanding of bookkeeping is important as you’ll need to be able to balance your own books and fill in your self-assessment tax return. Remember that this is your livelihood and not a hobby, your income should reflect this.

Similarly, a good understanding of marketing and self-promotion will be needed to get your business off the ground.

Finally, an ability to network and negotiate with both your customers and local animal industry is key. Never underestimate the potential for clients to try and negotiate price or you could find yourself working for substantially less than you might have hoped.

3. Be aware of the rules and regulations

Although there are relatively few regulations specifically targeted at dog walkers, businesses providing a service must get public liability insurance.

If this is the start-up business idea for you, be aware you may have to deal with dogs injuring other dogs or people while in your charge.

It’s vital to have the right insurance cover to deal with legal claims, should they arise.

They can help provide you with support and advice on dog walkers insurance and training, plus your membership will give your clients confidence.

To ensure you abide by key regulations, Narps suggest you should:

  • Meet owners prior to the first booking
  • Restrict the number of dogs walked to no more than four at a time
  • Keep records of all work undertaken
  • Protect clients’ personal information

All dogs in public must wear a collar with the owners name and address on it and you could be fined up to £1,000 if you fail to clean up its faeces.

While not the most exciting element of running your own business, it’s crucial you keep abreast of the latest rules and regulations to ensure you’re not jeopardising the safety of others or the reputation of your business.

4. Find a niche in the market

Given the popularity of setting up a dog walking business, it’s very probable you’ll have to find a niche to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

Above all else, carry out market research and see if there’s actually room in your area for another dog walker.

A simple google search or contacting NarpsUK will help a lot in this regard.

Consider offering pet sitting as well as dog walking. Much like babysitting, you’ll mind your client’s pets at their home while they are away, as well as feeding them and attending to any medical needs such as medication or fulfilling dietary requirements.

Having a diploma in pet medication would be advantageous in this instance as it would allow you to cater to a specific group of dogs.

Provided you are properly trained, you could also offer grooming services such as hair cutting or washing.

Offering one-to-one intense sessions with larger dogs could also widen your appeal.

Some dogs simply won’t be satisfied by a trip around the block and will require a more strenuous workout.

For more information on starting a dog walking business, take a look atour in-depth guide to help you prepare for the launch of your start-up.

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Accountant – Career Rankings, Salary, Reviews and Advice #denver #business #journal


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Accountant Overview

Overview

Whether it’s the money-laundering stoner in “Weeds” or the dorky auditor in “Parks and Recreation,” pop culture tends to portray an unsavory picture of accountants, but this profession doesn’t deserve such a bad reputation. Accountants make a pretty good living, and they have a lot of job security. After all, as long as people make money, they’ll need other people to handle it for them.

Put simply, an accountant is a person who keeps or inspects financial records. They’re “numbers” people who excel at organization and detail-oriented work. Since they deal with money – sometimes significant amounts of it – accountants must also possess a high degree of integrity.And because they’re constantly interacting with clients, accountants should be effective communicators. Patty Pogemiller, the national director for talent and acquisition and mobility for Deloitte, one of the world’s “Big Four” accounting firms, writes in an email, “Problem solving skills are essential in a client business like professional services. Employers are looking for people who demonstrate an ability to think analytically and approach a problem in a structured and methodical way. Can they objectively analyze and solve an issue? And once they have a solution, they must have the ability to communicate it to others – their clients, managers and fellow team members.”

In addition to preparing taxes for individuals, public accountants can also perform audits, prepare taxes and provide consulting for corporations, nonprofit organizations and governments. Internal accountants create processes to find and eliminate financial waste and fraud. Management accountants record and analyze financial information. Government accountants – at the federal, state or local level – maintain records of government agencies and audit private businesses or individuals whose activities fall under government regulation or taxation.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 142,400 new accounting and auditing jobs will open up by 2024. This equates to an 11 percent job growth rate.

Quick Stats

$65,940 Median Salary

3.2% Unemployment Rate

142,400 Number of Jobs

Salary

According to the BLS, the median annual salary for an accountant was $65,940 in 2014. The best-paid 10 percent earned roughly $115,950, while the lowest-paid made approximately $40,850. The best-compensated accountants work in the fields of securities and commodity contracts intermediation and brokerage and for the federal executive branch. The highest-paid accountants work in the metropolitan areas of New York City, San Jose, California and Salinas, California.

75th Percentile. $87,530

25th Percentile. $51,130

How much do Accountants make in your city?

See current salary offers for jobs in this field

Training

Although there are some associate degrees for accounting, a bachelor’s degree generally looks better to prospective employers. Some employers may even prefer that their accountants have a master’s degree in accounting or business administration with a concentration in accounting. And some universities and colleges offer a five-year combined bachelor’s and master’s degree program, which is a smart choice for students hoping to take the Certified Public Accountant exam. Most states require graduates to have a total of 150 hours of coursework, which equates to five years of school, before sitting for the exam. After passing, accountants will be able to file reports to the Securities and Exchange Commission, which makes them much more attractive to employers. Christopher Ekimoff, the director of FTI Consulting, a global business advisory firm, says, “Those three letters [CPA] really make your career. They will identify you in the marketplace, in the business world and in your career path as a professional willing to hold yourself to a higher standard and operate under a set of guidelines and principles that really set you apart.”

In addition to the CPA certification, accountants may also want to get the Certified Management Accountant certification, which requires a bachelor’s degree, two years of work in management accounting and passing an exam. There are also a handful of other certifications that accountants may want to procure down the line, including the Certified Internal Auditor certification and the Certified Information Systems Auditor certification.

Job Satisfaction

Average Americans work well into their 60s, so workers might as well have a job that’s enjoyable and a career that’s fulfilling. A job with a low stress level, good work-life balance and solid prospects to improve, get promoted and earn a higher salary would make many employees happy. Here’s how this job’s satisfaction is rated in terms of upward mobility, stress level and flexibility.

Upward Mobility. High
Opportunities for advancements and salary

Stress Level. Average
Work environment and complexities of the job s responsibilities

Flexibility. Above Average
Alternative working schedule and work life balance

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NSW Small Business Commissioner – Quality face-to-face advice from Small Biz Connect

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Quality face-to-face advice from Small Biz Connect – NSW Small Business Commissioner

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Quality face-to-face advice from Small Biz Connect

Small Biz Connect is a quality, personalised and highly subsidised business advisory program for small businesses in NSW.

Through the program, you can:

  • Get expert advice on managing your small business
  • Access face-to-face support
  • Develop key business skills

Small Biz Connect is funded by the NSW Government and will link with other business support services such as the Commonwealth Government’s Entrepreneurs’ Infrastructure program, as well as initiatives of Local Government and private enterprise.

Whether you’re just starting out, want to expand your business or are ready to retire, take the next step with Small Biz Connect.

Please call 1300 134 359 or download the Business Advisor Locations in NSW (PDF 1.4MB)to make an appointment with your local advisor.

Progroom’s story

Every day Small Biz Connect works with small business owners to assist them to achieve their goals through personalised, in depth support.

This video tells the story of the journey of southern-Sydney based small business, Progroom, and explains how working with a business advisor helped them set out a clear path for getting their business to where they want it to be.

Progroom’s story is a shining example of how small businesses can really benefit from the Small Biz Connect program.



Small Business Advice Program #business #idea


#small business advice

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Small Business Advice Programme

This project is a voluntary response by the business community to the challenges that recession brings for small business across the country. We have assembled a panel of people, with significant business experience, who are volunteering their time to give practical advice to small businesses. Your business can benefit from tapping into this pool of knowledge by applying for an advice meeting through this site.

No cost.

No hassle.

No long application process.

Just practical advice from experienced people who are volunteering to help keep your business in business.

Tuesday, March 27 2012

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into The Dublin Region

On 28th March 2012, John Perry TD, Minister for Small Business will lauch the programme in the Dublin region.

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into Mid-West Region

‘Minister Peter Power launches voluntary programme to help small businesses’

A programme designed specifically to come to the aid of small businesses and help them ride out the recession is being expanded into the Mid West Region (Clare, Limerick and Tipperary), it was announced last night in Thomond Park, Limerick.

The move follows the success of the programme in Carlow, Cork, Kilkenny, Waterford and Wexford over recent months. More than 60 volunteer advisors with different skill sets have helped over 150 companies since the smallbusinessadvice.ie launched in late 2009, giving specific confidential help on the problems facing small business in a downturn.

Tuesday, May 11 2010

Small Business Support Programme Expands Into South-East Region

‘Minister O’Keeffe launches voluntary programme to help small businesses’

A programme designed specifically to come to the aid of small businesses and help them ride out the recession is being expanded into the South East Region (Waterford, Wexford, Kilkenny and Carlow), it was announced last night (Monday, May 10) in Waterford.

The move follows the success of the pilot in the Cork region over the past six months. More than 35 volunteer advisors with different skill sets have helped over 70 companies since the smallbusinessadvice.ie launch in late 2009, giving specific confidential help on the problems facing small business in a downturn.



10 steps to starting a business: Starting a business advice and business

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10 steps to starting a business

Starting a small business is easy using our step-by-step guides. The 10 steps below will teach you how to start a business, taking you through each of the key stages of the start-up process – from evaluating your business idea and choosing a company name through to designing your business cards, developing a website and, finally, getting ready to launch.

Starting a business? 7 things you need to do first

  • How to start a business: What you need to know

    Key topics

    Need a loan to get your business started? A website design? Or maybe some separate business broadband? Get quotes and start saving now with our Startups Resources

    Field research is a key part of analysing your market and will help you build a successful business plan and brand. Here’s how to carry it out effectively.

    Sole trader, partnership, limited company or LLP? We look at how to choose the right legal structure for your start-up

    Choosing the right start-up name is extremely important. Here’s a practical guide on how to pick out the best name to ultimately build a better business

    Five fundamental points your logo should convey to your customers

    Looking to raise finance for your new business? Join the 30,000 plus Start Up Loan recipients today…

    Tips from Startups on how to pick the number cruncher that’s right for your small business

    What exactly do you need to consider when looking for the perfect premises?

    John Paterson rounds up the free and low-cost software options available to help you start your business

    Dealing with business red tape? Startups has complied the five key legal issues and how best to deal with them…

    What types of selling do you need to use? Startups covers a few of the most important selling techniques for your business

    You’ve got a business idea but what are the next steps? Startups has compiled a launchpad guide to help you put the foundations in place for business success

    Startups answers the key questions you should ask before starting your own business

    Latest on Startups

    To celebrate 10 years of its Business IP Centre, on September 27 the Library is holding a free day of workshops from the likes of Julie Deane OBE.

    A professional musician who’s preformed alongside the likes of Lana del Ray and Beyoncé – Katie Sayles talks about her new pre-school members’ club

    Research from the FSB suggests the introduction of the minimum £7.20-an-hour rate has led many small firms to increase prices and reduce staff hours

    App which operates via Bluetooth connected handleba device backed by TrueStart, Seedrs, and mayor’s London Co-Investment Fund

    Purple Cow ” rel=”bookmark”>The business book you need to read this month: Purple Cow

    With a focus on ‘transforming your business by being remarkable’, entrepreneur Daniel Keighron-Foster advocates Seth Godin’s seminal book

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  • How to start a vending machine franchise: Starting a business advice and

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    How to start a vending machine franchise

    Vending machines are pretty much part of our everyday lives. Drinks, snacks and all manner of personal goods are dispensed into our waiting grasp at the push of a button. But just because this process involves no human interaction doesn t mean the machine did it all by itself.

    A vending franchise is the means to this end and it often proves to be a surprisingly varied career opportunity.

    What is it?

    The world of vending machine franchises is not large but considering the products on offer, it is significant. Unusually among franchises there are a number that can be run on a part time basis as well as full time so you can largely choose your hours. Although be aware this is not the case with all.

    Drinkmaster largely does what it says on the franchise. It provides machine dispensed coffee, tea, chocolate and soft drinks as well as soft drinks like orange, blackcurrant and so on.

    The franchisee s job is to promote the brand to potential customers throughout a designated territory, deliver products and provide customer care. And although it is their job to grow the territory, they have an existing client base from day one.

    SSL International is the parent company of Durex vending, which services mainly pubs with condom vending machines. Unlike the others this is only a fulltime franchise but you make your own appointments so is therefore still flexible in terms of hours.

    Some technical aptitude is required for the work as you are required to service machines as well as re-stock and collect money. But to really grow the business, you will also need to find new business so a good way with people is also a helpful attribute.

    A Vendor supplies bottled Evian and Volvic flavoured water to any public space that might provide a marketplace: schools, leisure centres and so on. This is really a part time franchise at least to start with 10 machines can be serviced in one day. It is ideally suited to people who want an extra income.

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    Advice For Start Home Based Business #austin #business #journal


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    Advice For Start Home Based Business

    After deciding on the type of business you want to start, it will be time to take the next steps.

    Even though you will be working from home. this is still a business, and you must always remember that.

    There are a few things you should ask before start home based business:

    1. Will you work specific hours each day?
    2. Will it be necessary for you to separate your family and work spaces?
    3. Are customers going to come to your physical location, or will everything be done with the help of your home computer, phone and any mobile devices?
    4. Will this be a full-time situation, or are you planning to continue working at your current job?

    The answers to all of these questions will help you determine how much of an effect your home business will have on your family life. If you plan to work at home in addition to a current job, there is a chance that you may become overworked.

    It is a good idea to break up your day a bit. You can also ask a family member for help if you become overwhelmed. They can assist you with things like answering phones, printing shipping labels and responding to emails.

    There are other tasks that you will need to complete yourself. These include calling clients or writing articles. You can do these after everyone has gone to bed for the night. This means that your work day will not have to dip so far into your family time.

    It is crucial that you are very disciplined and consistent when you are working from home. This means that you should continue learning more each day and using it to better your business. This will help you reach the heights of success you have been striving for.

    When you first start your business, you will have to work very hard with promotions. Becoming a household name is not something that happens overnight, so you will need to be patient and persistent.

    When you are working from home, no one is able to see you. It will be your job to find people who will be interested in your products and services.

    This means that you will have to put a great deal of time and effort into the marketing of your home business. It may sound hard, but it will pay off later.

    Having a phone number and a web address on all of your promotional materials will make it easy for people to contact you in order to get what they need.

    It will be necessary for you to have a decent source of income until you can get your business off of the ground.

    You should plan ahead and make sure that you have a substantial amount in your savings. It is recommended that you have enough money to last you for six months to one tear.

    Cooking more meals at home and streaming content online can help you save more money in the interim.

    You can also consider a part-time job since that can help you cover basic business expenses. You should also consider selling any household items you had no use for if you are looking for extra cash for your business.

    Your business will do particularly well if y ou are able to get a great start. Having the right mindset and remaining optimistic when you get started will help you become as successful as you could have ever imagined.

    Click here if you want to learn how to start and build a successful home based business.

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    A List Of The Worst Business Advice You Can Follow – Ever

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    A List Of The Worst Business Advice You Can Follow Ever

    There’s plenty of advice out there for how to start and run a business. But not all of it is good. In fact, there are some common sayings that are actually some of the worst business advice out there. The following includes some of the worst business advice you can follow.

    The Worst Business Advice

    Do What You Love

    Although it may seem like a nice notion, this popular saying is widely considered one of the worst pieces of business advice out there. Just because you love doing something doesn’t mean that others will find it helpful or necessary. And if no one buys what you’re selling, then doing what you love won’t really get you anywhere.

    If You Build It, They Will Come

    Likewise, simply building an offering doesn’t mean that you’ll actually attract any customers. This saying implies that if you put in the work, there are customers out there who will support your business. But if you don’t do the research and find a market for your product or service, you very well could be in for a rude awakening.

    The Customer is Always Right

    This popular saying is meant to encourage business owners and employees to work hard to accommodate customers. And while customers and their opinions are generally important to the success of businesses, they’re not always right. If you’re constantly giving discounts or changing your offerings every time a customer makes a demand, you could be hurting your brand and your bottom line.

    Never Turn Down a Paying Customer

    Likewise, you shouldn’t assume that every customer you get will help your business. Especially if you have a consulting business or provide some other service where it can be necessary for you to work with someone over the long-term, it may very well be in your best interest to only take on a few very select clients.

    Don t Quit Your Day Job

    This is some of the worst business advice out there because there’s no right path for every entrepreneur. If you’re just starting out, it may very well be in your best interest to keep your full-time job while building a business. But then again you might be better off quitting and putting all your time and effort into your new venture. When it comes to making this decision, each entrepreneur has to decide based on his or her own set of circumstances, and not listen to a single one-size-fits-all recommendation.

    Stay Away From Established Markets

    Some experts claim that in order to start a successful business, you need to find a brand new niche or a huge gap in the market. But that’s not always true. You can start a business in an established market as long as you have at least one small thing that customers will appreciate to set you apart.

    If You Want Something Done Right, You Have to Do It Yourself

    Too many business owners try to do everything themselves because they have a hard time trusting anyone else with their business. But the fact is there are experts and great potential employees out there who can help you do things better than you could all by yourself.

    It s All About Who You Know

    Personal connections can certainly be helpful when it comes to running a successful business. But putting such a huge emphasis on them can discourage some people who aren’t well connected from starting businesses. You can always build connections as you go.

    Stick to Your Plan

    A business plan is a helpful tool. But it shouldn’t be the ultimate, unchanging guide for your business. Sometimes things change, and you should be able to adapt your plan to those changes.

    Follow an Established Path to Success

    Some experts think that there are just one or two ways to make it in the business world. But young, innovative entrepreneurs are forging their own paths every day. So don’t let anyone tell you that there’s one path you HAVE TO take in order to succeed.

    Keep Your Business and Personal Life Separate

    While there can be some merit to this piece of advice in certain situations, it’s no longer an absolute rule. Some small businesses actually thrive because the owner or the team shares their personality with customers. You don’t need to air all of your personal drama on social media. But being a little bit open and personable with your customers can be a good thing.

    All Attention is Good Attention

    Drawing attention to your business, especially during the early stages, can be difficult. So when you get any type of attention or press it might seem like a good thing. But if that attention isn’t in line with your brand and the image you want to portray, it could be doing more harm than good.

    Hire the Most Experienced People

    Experience can be a very good quality when looking to build your team. But it shouldn’t be the only quality you look for. Finding people who are enthusiastic, talented, creative and who share your vision for your business can be just as important if not more so.

    Offer the Lowest Prices

    Plenty of new businesses fall into the trap of trying to differentiate themselves from the competition by offering the lowest prices. But that isn’t always sustainable depending upon your costs and your business model. And it could damage your reputation moving forward.

    Work Hard and Success Will Come

    Hard work is certainly important when it comes to running a successful business. But it is not the only thing that matters. Don’t think that just because you’re putting in long hours and trying your best that success will eventually come. Sometimes it s more important to work smart than to work hard. Ultimately, the results you get are what matter.

    Don t Try New Things

    If you’ve found one or two things that work in your business, it can seem like a safe bet to stick with what works. But doing that won’t allow your business to grow as quickly as you might like. Trying new things can be risky, but it can also be rewarding.

    Never Say No

    Saying no to new clients, partnerships or opportunities may seem like a bad business strategy. But if you say yes to everything, you could be spreading yourself too thin or taking your business in too many different directions. You need to be very intentional when making those decisions so you can be sure that they’re going to benefit your business in the long run.

    You Have to Spend Money to Make Money

    This can be true in some circumstances. But you shouldn’t fall into the trap of thinking that making big investments in new equipment, employees, training or other resources, will magically make your business better. You need to be smart about how you spend. And besides, many entrepreneurs have built highly successful businesses with very few or almost no resources at all .

    Never Stop Working

    You have to work hard to run a successful business. But you also need to find a balance, or else you’ll burn yourself out and find yourself too uninspired to run your business successful. The risk of burnout is one reason work-life balance is an absolute must.

    Give Up

    Not all businesses succeed. In fact, most don’t. But this is still some of the worst business advice you could ever receive. It’s never up to someone else whether you give up or not. If that’s a decision you need to make, it should be based on more than just outside opinions. Never let others decide when it is time for you to throw in the towel.

    What are some of the worst pieces of business advice you have ever heard?

    Annie Pilon is a Senior Staff Writer for Small Business Trends, covering entrepreneur profiles, interviews, feature stories, community news and in-depth, expert-based guides. When she’s not writing she can be found on her personal blog Wattlebird. and exploring all that her home state of Michigan has to offer.

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