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I want to be a dog walker #small #business #investment


#dog walking business

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I want to be a dog walker. What will my salary be? Add to.

Job: Professional dog walker

Role: Dog walking is no day at the park. The role of a professional dog walker comes with a lot of responsibility, and requires relationship building with both pets and their owners. That is because dog walkers are often given access to their clients’ homes, and trusted with the care of their beloved animals. Doing so requires keeping a close eye on their pet at all times, which can be difficult when walking more than one dog at a time.

“I treat the dogs like my children,” said Jon Chaisson, the owner of Busters Dog Walking Co. in Toronto and chairman of Professional Dog Walkers Canada, a non-profit organization that provides resources for commercial dog walkers.

“When I go to the park, I’m making sure they’re not pooping [in inappropriate places], and if they are I’m picking it up, making sure they’re not misbehaving, doing inappropriate things. I have to watch out for things they’re not accustomed to, like some may not be friendly around smaller children, so I need to keep them away from smaller children.”

Salary. The salary of a dog walker will depend on how many clients they have, whether they are self-employed or work for a company, and the level of service they are providing. Dog walkers typically charge between $15 and $25 per dog a day for their services, and in an industry heavily dependent on word-of-mouth, salaries typically grow along with reputation.

As such, Mr. Chaisson predicts that starting salaries can be as low as $15,000 a year, as beginners often need to charge less in order to attract their first few clients. As they build their client base and renegotiate their fees, however, that salary can skyrocket with time.

“You can make $100,000 a year, but it’s a lot of work,” he said, adding that many well-established professional dog walkers make around $80,000 per year, but only if they’ve received positive references, built a large client base and are working as many hours as possible each day.

Education. While there are no educational requirements for commercial dog walkers, some municipalities enforce strict licensing standards. In the City of Toronto, for example, dog walkers need to obtain a $250 commercial dog walker permit in order to walk more than three dogs at a time (with a maximum of six), all of which must be on a leash unless in one of the city’s designated leash-free zones. Licensing laws vary between districts in Vancouver, where the price of a permit ranges from $350 in West Vancouver to $830 for a licence obtained in North Vancouver for businesses located outside of that district.

“It’s unique to big cities right now,” Mr. Chaisson said.

Obtaining a permit typically requires dog walkers to have liability insurance – at a cost of about $600 a year – and file taxes as registered businesses.

Dog walkers are also encouraged to get pet first aid and pet training certification, which can provide added credentials and allow them to charge more for their services, though it is not a requirement.

Job prospects: There is no shortage of dog lovers in Canada, many of whom need a little help taking care of their pets. The barrier to entry as a professional dog walker is quite low, but landing those first few clients can be difficult.

“It’s better if you can meet up with other dog walkers, start networking, and then they will refer people to you,” said Dianne Eibner, owner of Jog-a-Dog and founder of the Professional Dog Walkers Association International, which later became Professional Dog Walkers Canada. “That’s probably your best bet if you’re starting out; get to know other dog walkers who would be willing to refer you.”

Ms. Eibner adds that well-established dog walkers often reach their maximum capacity, and are typically willing to refer new clients to other dog walkers they trust.

Challenges: The biggest challenge dog walkers face in the great white north is undoubtedly the cold weather, which can make the job unbearable during the winter months.

“The winters can be hell, but you dress in layers and take the dogs out for shorter walks, because they do freeze as well,” Mr. Chaisson said.

Ms. Eibner, who is also the author of The Face in the Window – A Guide to Professional Dog Walking , adds that those who work as sole proprietors or run their own dog walking businesses also take on a lot of risk.

“It isn’t the most secure occupation,” she said. “If our client gets laid off from their work, we get laid off too.”

Why they do it: While the winter months make the outdoors the least pleasant aspect of the job, Mr. Chaisson says the opposite is true in summer. “You get to hang out in the sunshine all day while everybody else is stuck inside in their stuffy jobs,” he said.

Furthermore, since many professional dog walkers work as sole proprietors or owners of their own business, they often get to set their own hours and pay.

“I’m able to work only three or four hours a day, and get a full day’s pay,” Mr. Chaisson said. “For six hours a day you can be making upwards of $80,000 to $100,000 [a year] if you really want to put work into it.”

Ms. Eibner adds that most dog walkers simply love spending their time caring for and playing with dogs.

“I love my job, I love hanging out with dogs,” she said. “It’s almost not like a job, but I treat it like a job – you have to on the business end of it – but other times I’m rolling around on the ground with them, that’s the part I enjoy.”

Misconceptions: Mr. Chaisson says that many people believe it’s an easy job, failing to comprehend the level of responsibility that comes with the role.

“You have to be fully aware that these are other people’s property,” he said. “It’s like a daycare; you constantly have to watch over the dogs as if they were your own.”

Ms. Eibner adds that some dog walkers have given the rest a bad name, and that people make assumptions based on a few bad apples.

“Unfortunately, there have been such incidents where a dog walker has caused problems for other people and park users,” she said. “It’s not pleasant when we are deemed guilty by association if or when one dog walker is seen not picking up after their dogs.”

Want to read more stories from our Salaries Series? Find more here .

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5 Small Business Magazines You Need to Be Reading #business #credit


#small business magazine

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5 Must-Read Magazines for Your Small Business

You may be asking yourself, why am I soliciting print advice from a digital marketing resource center? Well, we at Get Busy Media find value in content that helps small businesses solve problems and grow; regardless of how and in what format this content is packaged. Today we’re going to take you through our five favorite small business magazines and why you, as a business owner, need to be consulting these resources.

Here are our top 5 small business magazines (and their tablet companions) :

1. Inc.

Inc. is the veritable bible for small business owners. If you were stuck on a desert island selling widgets and had only one magazine to consult from, I would recommend Inc hands down. This magazine is chock-full of amazing statistics, case studies, interviews and reviews about small business owners and startups who have found success and why. Too many young readers today are inundated with stories of successful tech startups. Rest assured that Inc. will provide you with a wide variety of successful small business stories. They will provide you with stories of why learning to tell jokes is good for business to a who’s who of crowdfunding platforms and which ones small businesses should leverage depending on their specific needs.

  • Get Real by Jason Fried – co-founder of 37 Signals (software company that created Basecamp) and author of Rework pens this column that normally appears between pages 35 and 40
  • Crunching the Numbers – I love the charts and graphs that are included in this section. For instance, did you know that the cities that experienced the greatest increase in the number of jobs at companies with fewer than 100 employees from August 10 to August 11 were Orlando, Atlanta and Greensboro, North Carolina (who would have guessed these cities?)
  • Tech Trends­­ – John Brandon does a great job with this column. He reviews all the latest gadgets and new technology that make your life as a small business owner easier.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Inc. does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

2. Entrepreneur

Entrepreneur magazine is a must have for anyone looking to start a small business. Entrepreneur’s target is more narrowly focused than Inc’s but that’s what makes it so great. Within this magazine you will find every pain point imaginable to starting and running a profitable business (economy, work/life balance issues, co-founder discord, death of a co-founder, production issues, supply chain problems, to name just a few). You will find articles ranging from how a 14-year old kid started his own candle company based on manly scents (fresh cut grass, steak and wood chips, to name a few) to how two guys pivoted and turned their failing lifestyle website into a flash deals site and made a profit in the first month.

  • Lead Gen ­– Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer of MarketingProfs.com and Co-Author of Content Rules authors this column that speaks to the power of great content and how to reach your customers through online content.
  • Linked – Chris Brogan. Founder of Human Business Works and co-author of Trust Agents is one of the preeminent experts in relationship and digital marketing. If you have enough time to read only one column in this magazine each month, read his.

iPad app: This app needs some work. When you zoom in to read on the iPad, the text becomes difficult to read. The abundance of ads on this app is also bothersome and takes away from the overall experience.

Cost. Free (comes with Entrepreneur print subscription)

3. Fast Company

Of the three magazines we have reviewed thus far, Fast Company is certainly the edgiest and hippest. To be honest, there’s a reason why this publication is #3 on the list behind Inc and Entrepreneur. A salient example for those who like sports, is that Fast Company is to ESPN The Magazine what Inc. is to Sports Illustrated. SI is the preeminent resource in sports journalism in the United States, much as Inc. is widely regarded as the benchmark for publications for small businesses and startups. ESPN the Magazine on the other hand is flashy, heavy on images and graphics and appeals to a hipper, younger generation than Sports Illustrated. By no means is this a bad thing, but I felt that I should use this example to illustrate the difference between Fast Company and their approach versus Inc.’s approach.

One aspect of Fast Company that I enjoy much more than the previous two publications on this list is their long form feature stories. Fast Company’s featured stories tend to be much more content-rich and just plain longer in general than its counterparts. I love that I can sit down and read one of these stories and am captivated for 20 minutes.

  • Tech Edge­ – authored by Farhad Manjoo, this column is very similar to Tech Trends in Inc. just with a little more irreverence.

iPad app: Appears that as of February, 2012 Fast Company does not have an iPad app based on my extensive searches in the App. store that returned no results for this magazine.

4. Wired

Wired is an incredible magazine. I don’t care who you are, this magazine is always, always visually stunning and filled with incredible content about science and technology. There is no doubt in my mind that Chris Anderson, Editor-in-Chief of Wired. sits down with all departments within the company to ensure that design, content and layout all flow and play nice together. While this magazine tends to be very science and tech heavy, there are amazing pieces of information here that are applicable to small businesses, especially those who are progressive and technology-oriented.

  • Dear Mr. Know-it-all – this is an awesome column where Mr. Know it All fields questions from those looking to navigate their issues in the 21st century. Some questions may surprise you, but you’ll find the answers even more interesting.
  • Test – they test everything from Universal remotes to solar charges to ultrabooks – very neat column.

iPad app – amazing layout (which is par for the course for Wired) but loading the iPad edition by my count takes between 6 and 8 minutes (depending on the length of the issue), which in my opinion is tired not wired.

Cost. Free (comes with Wired print subscription)

5. Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek is obviously a behemoth in the business and financial news sector. While this periodical isn’t tailored specifically for small businesses and startups, there’s a ton of information you can cull from Bloomberg. The great thing about Bloomberg is that it’s laid out in a format that is easy-to-read and digestible. A few sections I particularly enjoy are the Technology and Companies and Industries sections. Both contain information that is pertinent for small businesses.

iPad app – I haven’t played around much with the app on my iPad but from my limited experience, this seems like another great app for the iPad

Cost. Free (comes with Bloomberg print subscription)

What do you think of my list of the top small business magazines? Who did I miss? Do you disagree with any of my choices? We would love to hear your thoughts. Please leave your thoughts in the Comments section below.

About Jim Armstrong

Jim Armstrong is the Co-Founder of Get Busy Media and a paid search specialist. Since 2008, Jim has built his knowledge around emerging media and leveraged several experiences to develop a keen understanding of internet marketing. His core competencies include search marketing, SEO, email marketing, social media marketing and online reputation management. Jim currently works for Google, as an account manager. When not diving headfirst into his next project, Jim enjoys spending time with his family, fishing and writing. Jim on Google+

Comments

I love Forbes online and have followed some of their contributors in particular.



Your business website may be hurting your company #business #cards #design


#business website

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The Best Webite Design Company in Nigeria

With today’s mad rush by every company to get a business website, it is wise to advise companies about the fact that creating a website for your business may be essentially damaging your company’s reputation.

Why? How? You may ask

Did you know that if your business website is dormant, visitors (that is if you even have any visitors at all) may erroneously believe that your company must have become dormant as well. Maybe that is why the last update on your business’ official website is 1 and half years old. Trust me nothing could present you as being unserious with your business as this. Especially if your company is the type that requires frequent update like schools, hotels, religious organizations (like churches), etc.

For example, if you retail clothing and accessories, how do you explain to your potential customers online that the exact products displayed in your online business website 1 year ago are still the same products that are still in your store today. Don’t you think it would be safe to assume that you are no longer in business?

Or how would you expect me to believe you are still in business when I send you an email via the address on your business website and I get no response from your company after 1 month. This is very common with Nigerian company websites.

What most companies do not understand is that the internet is a very dynamic world and it is either you change and adapt or you die and get forgotten.

In conclusion, I would like to advise companies that if they must own a website for business, they must be willing to establish a department for managing their online presence or simply outsource that service to a professional web and social media management consultant.



Investor – s Business Daily to become a weekly, 20 news jobs

#investor business daily

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Investor s Business Daily to become a weekly, 20 news jobs to be cut

Investor s Business Daily, which has published five days a week since its founding in 1984, will announce next week that it will become a weekly newspaper and will focus its editorial efforts more online.

The change is expected to take effect on May 2, Talking Biz News has confirmed. The Los Angeles-based newspaper will be put to bed Friday evening and publish early the following week.

About 20 newsroom jobs will be cut as a result of the change, leaving slightly more than 40 in the editorial side of the newspaper. Additional cuts will be made in other departments.

IBD has been profitable, but we recognize that readership trends don’t favor daily newspapers, said managing editor Susan Warfel. We’re adjusting our business model now because we want to move from a position of strength and take advantage of the best growth opportunities in our business.

Warfel said that the newspaper will retain the Investor s Business Daily name because it will publish every day on the Internet.

At one point, Investor s Business Daily hoped to grow to a subscription base of 700,000 to 1 million. And in 2000, its circulation was above 300,000. But the paper had a circulation or 113,038 in the third quarter of 2015. down from 157,161 in 2013. It had 46,213 print subscribers and 62,372 digital subscribers.

The newspaper s website, www.investors.com, added a paywall more than a decade ago, and the newspaper believes that the shift to a web focus for most of the week will allow it to improve its profit margins.

IBD currently attracts over 4 million monthly unique visitors and publishes investment analysis products such as Leaderboard. Several mobile-first product launches are scheduled within the next year.

The newspaper was started as Investor s Daily by investor and stockbroker William O Neil, who has since endowed a professorship in business journalism at Southern Methodist University. It changed its name to Investor s Business Daily in 1991.

O Neil was frustrated that he couldn t obtain data about stocks in any other newspaper, including The Wall Street Journal, that he wanted to use to make investment decisions. Investor s Business Daily s stock listings include a proprietary ratings system.

Its core readers are self-directed investors, especially those who favor growth stocks who take a hands-on approach to their investments rather than leave the decision-making to someone else.

In 2008, the newspaper won its only Pulitzer Prize. Michael Ramirez. the editorial cartoonist for the newspaper, won the Pulitzer in that category.

Talking Biz News interviewed Warfel in May 2015 about the paper s operation. Read that interview here .



10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful #online

#business books

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10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful

10 Influential Business Books You Need To Read To Be Successful

Take a minute and think about some of the most successful people you know.

I d bet they re great with people, are super-productive, and think differently than most. After all, that s how they got to be where they are today.

Jealous of them? You don t have to be. You can learn these same skills by studying some of the best business books that can help you take your game to the next level. Here s 10 of my favorites.

1. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Dale Carnegie s best-selling book that helped to launch a personal growth empire should be required reading for everyone who wants to learn how to build and nurture relationships for a lifetime. Read this book and you ll learn some simple advice than can help you build popularity points within your current network and just as important, expand it to others.

2. Focal Point by Brian Tracy

Got a lot on your to-do list? Of course you do. But what separates productive people from others is their ability to focus on a singular task at a time, and getting it done before moving on to the next one.

Sounds simple in theory, but this can be extremely difficult in practice. In Focal Point Brian Tracy offers tips to help build discipline and organization into your day so you can get more stuff done.

3. Purple Cow by Seth Godin

Creating a me-too product can be easy at the start but can doom you to business failure. That s why marketing maverick Seth Godin recommends creating a product that is truly different from anything already available in the marketplace.

In essence by making the product different you ll be building the marketing into the actual product development which just makes your actual marketing a helluva lot easier.

4. Magic of Thinking Big by David Schwartz

If you ve struggled with procrastination or small thinking, this is the book for you. In it Schwartz offers practical advice that can help you get inspired and motivated to create a bigger life for yourself. And with it can be a more lucrative and rewarding career.

5. Man s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankel

It can be difficult for lots of people to keep things in perspective, especially when working on high priority and urgent projects at work. Man s Search for Meaning can be a life-changing book in the sense that it can open your eyes to a first-hand experience of one of the greatest atrocities in the history of mankind, while also teaching a valuable lesson about having purpose.

6. 4 Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss

Solo-entrepreneurs can learn a ton from the guy who made lifestyle design popular. But guess what? The 4HWW isn t just for guys and girls who want to start a small online business.

Smart moves like outsourcing, following the 80/20 rule, and automating processes should be made by entry-level workers and established executives alike.

7. Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

I remember sitting on a couch and opening this book on a Saturday morning, thinking I d get through a chapter and then get on with my day. Instead, about 12 hours later, I was finished with the book. The concepts in it were mind-blowing to me.

To think that thoughts can create your reality sounded a little far-fetched at first. But after going through the book and understanding that your thoughts create your beliefs, which lead to actions, which then lead to habits .well you can get where I m going with this.

If you focus your thoughts on success, achieving it will be much more likely than thinking about obstacles, failures and everything else that can get in your way.

8. One Minute Manager by Kenneth Blanchard

If you re going to read one management book in your life, this should be it. It s simple. You can read it in an afternoon. And the advice works.

9. Lean Start-Up by Eric Ries

Before you create any sort of business you ll want to give Lean Start-Up a read through. Doing so can save you money, time and other resources you could have potentially wasted otherwise.

10. The Monk and the Riddle by Randy Komisar

The story Randy Komisar shares in the Monk and the Riddle offers advice about not just about how you need to think when starting a new business, but also about how to build a life you re passionate about.

Understanding the technical aspects of launching a start-up is great, but if you don t have the staying power to stick with it when the going gets tough then it s not likely to work. This book can help you understand this lesson before you spend blood, sweat and tears on a project that you re heart isn t into.

Set a Goal For Yourself



Requirements to Be a Nurse in the U #requirements #to #get #into

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Requirements to Be a Nurse in the U.S.

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

LPN and LVN Training Programs

Entry-level training for licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses can be obtained via 1-year educational programs offered at technical schools, vocational schools or community colleges. LPN/LVN programs involve both lecture-type classes and hands-on clinical practice in a hospital or clinic. Typical courses include anatomy, first aid, nutrition and physiology.

Associate’s Degree in Nursing

In order to become an RN, candidates need to have earned at minimum an Associate’s Degree in Nursing (ADN). Completing this degree program allows graduates to take the licensing examination to become RNs. Common courses include anatomy, nutrition, adult care and medicine practices.

Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree programs allow nursing students to learn about providing care and obtaining work experience in medical settings. Common courses include human development and healthcare, nursing theory, chemistry and infant care.

Master’s Degree in Nursing

Another type of registered nurse, known as an advanced practice nurse, must complete a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree program. Some MSN programs accept applications only from licensed RNs. Advanced practice nurses include nurse-midwives, nurse anesthetists, clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners. Courses in graduate nursing degree programs vary because they are usually focused on the area of concentration.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Clinical Nursing
  • Critical Care Nursing
  • Direct-Entry Midwifery – LM, CPM
  • Licensed Vocational Nurse Training
  • Mental Health Nursing
  • Neonatal Nursing
  • Nurse Anesthetist
  • Nurse Assistant or Patient Care Assistant
  • Nurse Midwife
  • Nurse Practitioner or Family Nurse Practitioner
  • Nursing Administration
  • Nursing for Adults and Seniors
  • Nursing Science
  • Occupational Health Nursing
  • Operating Room and Surgical Nursing
  • Pediatric Nursing
  • Public Health Nurse or Community Nurse
  • Registered Nurse

Career Requirements to Become a Nurse

All nurses have to earn state licensure after they graduate from an educational program. Part of earning licensure is taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). This exam is given by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN), a nonprofit organization involved with regulating nurses in the U.S. Other licensing criteria may be required for nurses by each state. Continuing education credits are usually required for a nurse to renew her or his license.

Licensure Examination for Nurses

The National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) exists in two forms: one for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN) and one for practical nurses (NCLEX-PN|). Both exams require candidates to pay a fee, and exams can be taken via computer. The number of questions varies from person to person, depending on performance. The computer keeps giving questions until it is certain whether or not the test-taker is qualified.

Both the NCLEX-RN and the NCLEX-PN include questions about keeping patients and nurses safe by preventing accidents, using ergonomic principles, and correctly handling infectious items according to the NCSBN. Students answer questions about supporting culturally diverse patients in stressful situations, such as abuse, loss, mental illness or chemical dependency. Exam takers must know how to keep patients comfortable, identify appropriate use of medications, calculate doses and recognize adverse effects.

Certification

Certification is a way that nurses can show their ability to care for certain groups of people, such as children, the elderly or patients with mental illness. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), though these credentials are earned voluntarily, some employers may insist that the nurses they hire have additional certifications.

Professional organizations, such as the American Nursing Credentialing Center (ANCC), offer a wide array of certifications in diverse specialty areas, including pediatrics, psychiatric care and diabetes management. Another professional organization, the National League for Nursing, offers certification for nurse educators. Additional education may be required for some certifications.

Advanced Practice Nurse Certification

After earning degrees and obtaining RN licensing, nurse practitioners and other advanced practice nurses may need to undergo an additional process of certification, determined by the state in which they work. Certification allows an advanced practice nurse to perform specific care, depending on the state’s regulations. For example, certified nurse practitioners may be able to prescribe medications (which needs additional licensure), or serve as a patient’s primary health care provider.

Salary and Career Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimated that from 2014 – 2024, job opportunities for both RNs and LPNs/LVNs were expected to grow 16% — a good deal faster than average across all occupations. The BLS also reported in May 2015 that the average annual salary for RNs was $67,490; while LPNs/LVNs earned an average annual wage of $43,170 during that same reporting interval.

All nurses, whether LPNs/LVNs or RNs, must complete an approved nursing education program and pass a National Council Licensure Examination. Since nurses need different training for different work settings, prospective nurses should consider their career goals and workplace preferences when deciding on a nursing program.

Next: View Schools

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become an animal nurse. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as.

Learn how to become a chief nurse. Research the job description and the education and licensing requirements, and find out how.

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a nurse. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details.

Students interested in studying nursing in Wichita, KS, have only a few schools to choose from. Read about a top local school’s.

  • Doctorate
      • Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
      • Doctor of Nursing Practice with an Emphasis in Educational Leadership
      • EdD in Organizational Leadership – Health Care Administration
  • Master
      • MBA and MS in Nursing: Nursing Leadership in Health Care Systems (dual degree)
      • MS in Nursing: Nursing Leadership in Health Care Systems
      • M.S. in Nursing: Nursing Education
      • MS in Nursing: Nursing Education
      • MBA: Health Systems Management
      • MS in Health Care Administration
  • Bachelor
      • BS in Nursing (Registered Nurse – R.N. to BSN)
      • BS in Health Care Administration
      • BS in Health Sciences: Professional Development & Advanced Patient Care
      • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Science

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Why Alternative Financing Options Might Be Best for Your Small Business #business

#business financing options

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Why Alternative Financing Options Might Be Best for Your Small Business

The small business financing landscape is continually changing, with more options available to business owners than ever before. About half to two-thirds of these businesses seek financing from a number of places, from owner investments to non-bank sources. As small businesses continue to face challenges when it comes to gaining access to capital and taking advantage of opportunities to grow, it s important that they re seeking the right type of financing for their particular needs. There s been a lot of focus on alternative lending recently, but how do small business owners know when this is the right option to pursue?

One of the most obvious and common answers is that businesses seek financing when they re faced with an unexpected opportunity or challenge that requires quick capital. In my early years as a restaurateur, I built a chain of casual dining restaurants that saw strong growth, solid revenue and profitability. We had all the right elements, but excess cash wasn t one of them. When I was presented with the opportunity to purchase the ideal property for a new location, there was only one issue — I needed $250,000. I was able to get the money quickly from an alternative lender, and I saw the power in this financing option.

In my case and in the experiences of many others, this access to capital provided me the freedom and flexibility to take advantage of a deal that allowed my business to grow. I learned firsthand that when opportunities like these are handled properly, the benefits can be enormous.

Most of the time, small businesses don t have the cash on reserve or an established line of credit that enables them to withdraw the necessary funds for these types of opportunities. Alternative sources of lending help fill that void by giving business owners access, availability and speed. The reality is that traditional banks aren t equipped to do this — and it isn t profitable for them to provide loans of under $200,000.

So what are other situations small businesses often face that may benefit from an alternative source of financing? Check them out:

  • Purchasing discounted inventory, raw material or new equipment at a can t-miss price, such as a restaurant looking to make opportunistic purchases of wine during the holidays or a wholesaler in need of additional warehouse space and forklifts
  • Buying out a partner or to avoid taking on a partner who will own a chunk of the business and profits for life
  • Expanding to new locations
  • Harsh weather that forces a business to close days on end
  • Fluctuations in the economy that impact the bottom line
  • Unexpected occurrences that put pressure on cash flow and require an immediate influx of working capital, such as a refrigerator that stops working in a restaurant or a farmer needing to process the harvest

To determine what type of financing makes sense for your business and situation, you must consider what exactly needs to be funded and the timing. Alternative lending helps provide flexibility of repayment and offers creative options, including small daily payments that fluctuate with sales volume. It s also important for small business owners to understand the rates associated with choosing an alternative lender. This type of financing is more costly than a traditional bank loan because these companies act as liaisons, borrow capital from other financial institutions and guarantee the payment. Essentially, they absorb the risk and the losses when a client defaults. This is also further emphasized when taking into consideration that an application can be underwritten and approved in hours instead of weeks with a bank.

Whether you re a restaurant, retailer or medical practice, examining your situation closely will help determine the best financing option. Gaining access to capital can be the deciding factor in whether or not a small business grows or survives, so choose wisely when it comes to funding.



Investor – s Business Daily to become a weekly, 20 news jobs

#investor business daily

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Investor s Business Daily to become a weekly, 20 news jobs to be cut

Investor s Business Daily, which has published five days a week since its founding in 1984, will announce next week that it will become a weekly newspaper and will focus its editorial efforts more online.

The change is expected to take effect on May 2, Talking Biz News has confirmed. The Los Angeles-based newspaper will be put to bed Friday evening and publish early the following week.

About 20 newsroom jobs will be cut as a result of the change, leaving slightly more than 40 in the editorial side of the newspaper. Additional cuts will be made in other departments.

IBD has been profitable, but we recognize that readership trends don’t favor daily newspapers, said managing editor Susan Warfel. We’re adjusting our business model now because we want to move from a position of strength and take advantage of the best growth opportunities in our business.

Warfel said that the newspaper will retain the Investor s Business Daily name because it will publish every day on the Internet.

At one point, Investor s Business Daily hoped to grow to a subscription base of 700,000 to 1 million. And in 2000, its circulation was above 300,000. But the paper had a circulation or 113,038 in the third quarter of 2015. down from 157,161 in 2013. It had 46,213 print subscribers and 62,372 digital subscribers.

The newspaper s website, www.investors.com, added a paywall more than a decade ago, and the newspaper believes that the shift to a web focus for most of the week will allow it to improve its profit margins.

IBD currently attracts over 4 million monthly unique visitors and publishes investment analysis products such as Leaderboard. Several mobile-first product launches are scheduled within the next year.

The newspaper was started as Investor s Daily by investor and stockbroker William O Neil, who has since endowed a professorship in business journalism at Southern Methodist University. It changed its name to Investor s Business Daily in 1991.

O Neil was frustrated that he couldn t obtain data about stocks in any other newspaper, including The Wall Street Journal, that he wanted to use to make investment decisions. Investor s Business Daily s stock listings include a proprietary ratings system.

Its core readers are self-directed investors, especially those who favor growth stocks who take a hands-on approach to their investments rather than leave the decision-making to someone else.

In 2008, the newspaper won its only Pulitzer Prize. Michael Ramirez. the editorial cartoonist for the newspaper, won the Pulitzer in that category.

Talking Biz News interviewed Warfel in May 2015 about the paper s operation. Read that interview here .



First Florida Bank: Online Banking #bank, #banking, #florida, #first #florida, #first #florida

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First Florida Bank is made up of professional and business leaders of the local community who care about you. We believe you are looking for friendly, responsive service that makes your life easier. We also believe that banking needs to be flexible to meet today’s busy schedules.

In an effort to make your banking experience as convenient as possible, First Florida Bank offers a variety of services so you can easily access your account anytime, from any place.

  • Online Banking
  • ATM Services
  • Financial Calculators

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Why Alternative Financing Options Might Be Best for Your Small Business #business

#business financing options

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Why Alternative Financing Options Might Be Best for Your Small Business

The small business financing landscape is continually changing, with more options available to business owners than ever before. About half to two-thirds of these businesses seek financing from a number of places, from owner investments to non-bank sources. As small businesses continue to face challenges when it comes to gaining access to capital and taking advantage of opportunities to grow, it s important that they re seeking the right type of financing for their particular needs. There s been a lot of focus on alternative lending recently, but how do small business owners know when this is the right option to pursue?

One of the most obvious and common answers is that businesses seek financing when they re faced with an unexpected opportunity or challenge that requires quick capital. In my early years as a restaurateur, I built a chain of casual dining restaurants that saw strong growth, solid revenue and profitability. We had all the right elements, but excess cash wasn t one of them. When I was presented with the opportunity to purchase the ideal property for a new location, there was only one issue — I needed $250,000. I was able to get the money quickly from an alternative lender, and I saw the power in this financing option.

In my case and in the experiences of many others, this access to capital provided me the freedom and flexibility to take advantage of a deal that allowed my business to grow. I learned firsthand that when opportunities like these are handled properly, the benefits can be enormous.

Most of the time, small businesses don t have the cash on reserve or an established line of credit that enables them to withdraw the necessary funds for these types of opportunities. Alternative sources of lending help fill that void by giving business owners access, availability and speed. The reality is that traditional banks aren t equipped to do this — and it isn t profitable for them to provide loans of under $200,000.

So what are other situations small businesses often face that may benefit from an alternative source of financing? Check them out:

  • Purchasing discounted inventory, raw material or new equipment at a can t-miss price, such as a restaurant looking to make opportunistic purchases of wine during the holidays or a wholesaler in need of additional warehouse space and forklifts
  • Buying out a partner or to avoid taking on a partner who will own a chunk of the business and profits for life
  • Expanding to new locations
  • Harsh weather that forces a business to close days on end
  • Fluctuations in the economy that impact the bottom line
  • Unexpected occurrences that put pressure on cash flow and require an immediate influx of working capital, such as a refrigerator that stops working in a restaurant or a farmer needing to process the harvest

To determine what type of financing makes sense for your business and situation, you must consider what exactly needs to be funded and the timing. Alternative lending helps provide flexibility of repayment and offers creative options, including small daily payments that fluctuate with sales volume. It s also important for small business owners to understand the rates associated with choosing an alternative lender. This type of financing is more costly than a traditional bank loan because these companies act as liaisons, borrow capital from other financial institutions and guarantee the payment. Essentially, they absorb the risk and the losses when a client defaults. This is also further emphasized when taking into consideration that an application can be underwritten and approved in hours instead of weeks with a bank.

Whether you re a restaurant, retailer or medical practice, examining your situation closely will help determine the best financing option. Gaining access to capital can be the deciding factor in whether or not a small business grows or survives, so choose wisely when it comes to funding.