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Nevada Small Business Development Center, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


Nevada Small Business Development Center College of Business A partner in The Business Services Group

The Nevada Small Business Development Center is a statewide business assistance outreach program of the University of Nevada, Reno, College of Business. We provide a wide variety of technical assistance to support Nevada Business.

The purpose of the Nevada Small Business Development Center is to guide and assist entrepreneurs in starting and growing their businesses in today’s dynamic market.

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Made In Nevada

The Made in Nevada program is the longest running marketing cooperative in the Silver State. Originally established under Governor. Read More

Nevada SBDC State Director

“Small business is an economic powerhouse that knows you by your first name.” – NFIB. Nationally, small businesses continue. Read More

The Most Critical Steps in Preparing for a Successful Business

By: Debra Ward, Marketing Consultant, Dream Weaver Marketing Starting a new business is fun, but it takes careful planning. Read More

UPCOMING

Training

TECH TRAINING: Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity refers to the preventative techniques used to protect the integrity of networks, programs and data

WEBINAR SERIES: Where’s the Contract? State and Local Government Contracting: Buying and Selling Perspectives

Join the Nevada Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC), Procurement Outreach Program (POP) to learn more about

Make More Money from your Website

If you re not maximizing your revenue through your website, learn how to create this successful plan

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NSBDC

Highlighted Clients

Rollasole USA

Las Vegas, Nevada

Nevada Small Business Development Center assists small business owner to make shoe vending machines a popular Read More

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    The Nevada Small Business Development Center is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Contact the State office of the Nevada Small Business Development Center at (800) 240-7094.

    Nevada SBDC es financiado en parte a través de un Acuerdo Cooperativo con la Administración de Pequeños Negocios (SBA) de los Estados Unidos. Todos los servicios se extienden al público sobre una base no discriminatoria. Las acomodaciones razonables para las personas con discapacidades mentales o físicas se harán, si se solicitan con al menos dos semanas de anticipación. Comuníquese con la oficina del estado de Nevada SBDC al 1-800-240-7094 para hacer arreglos. SBA no puede respaldar ningún producto, opinión o servicio de ninguna institución o actividad externa.

    All SBDC programs and services are extended to the public on a non-discriminatory basis. Language assistance services for clients with limited English proficiency will be provided.

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    (800) 240-7094 // Contact Us

    Copyright © 2017 Nevada Small Business Development Center



    Small Business – Entrepreneurship Council, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Facts Data on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    A rundown on key facts, numbers and trends regarding entrepreneurship and small business

    American Business is Overwhelmingly Small Business

    In 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.83 million employer firms in the United States.

    • Firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses

    • Firms with less than 20 workers made up 89.4 percent of businesses.

    • Add in the number of nonemployer businesses – there were 24.3 million in 2015 – then the share of U.S. businesses with less than 20 workers increases to 97.9 percent.

    Among employer C Corporations in 2014, 85.0 percent had fewer than 20 employees, and 99.0 percent had less than 500 workers.

    The Small Business Share of GDP

    “Small businesses continue to be incubators for innovation and employment growth during the current recovery. Small businesses continue to play a vital role in the economy of the United States. They produced 46 percent of the private nonfarm GDP in 2008 (the most recent year for which the source data are available), compared with 48 percent in 2002.”

    Bulk of Job Creation Comes from Small Business

    According to the SBA’s Office of Advocacy:

    “Small businesses accounted for 63.3% of net new jobs from the third quarter of 1992 until the third quarter of 2013.”

    Small Business Share of Employment

    • Employer firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 47.8 percent of private sector payrolls in 2011

    • Employer firms with fewer than 100 workers employed 33.7 percent

    • Employer firms with less than 20 workers employed 17.1 percent

    Small Business and Innovation

    “Small businesses represent about 96% of employer firms in high-patenting manufacturing industries, a percentage that remained constant from 2007 to 2012. However, during the same time period, small businesses’ share of employment, payroll, and receipts increased. This increase was particularly notable in firms that manufactured computers and peripheral equipment, communications equipment, or semiconductors and other electronic components.”

    In addition, a 2008 study by Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks for the Office of Advocacy (“An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size”) found that “small firms are much more likely to develop emerging technologies than are large firms. This is perhaps intuitively reasonable given theories on small firms effecting technological change, but the quantitative data here support this assertion. Specifically, although small firms account for only 8 percent of patents granted, they account for 24 percent of the patents in the top 100 emerging clusters.”

    Small Business and Global Trade

    The U.S. Census Bureau noted the following about small and mid-size businesses in the international trade arena in 2015:

    • “Small- and medium-sized companies (those employing fewer than 500 workers, including number of employees unknown) comprised 97.6 percent of all identified exporters and 97.2 percent of all identified importers.”

    • “Among companies that both exported and imported in 2015, small- and medium-sized companies accounted for 94.3 percent of such companies…”

    • SMEs accounted “for 32.9 percent and 32.0 percent of the known export and import value, respectively.”

    • Among all U.S. manufacturers: “96.4 percent of manufacturing exporters were small- and medium-sized companies and they contributed 20.3 percent of the sector s $798 billion in exports. 93.5 percent of manufacturing importers were small- and medium-sized; they accounted for 14.5 percent of the sector’s $826 billion in imports.”

    • Among wholesalers: “99.1 percent of exporting wholesalers were small- and medium-sized companies; they accounted for 58.2 percent of the sector’s $297 billion in exports. 99.1 percent of wholesaler importers were small- and medium-sized; they contributed 55.4 percent of the sector’s $662 billion in imports.”

    Self-Employed Trending Down

    Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the level of entrepreneurship actually has declined in recent years. That is, the number of self-employed in the U.S. has dropped notably.

    • Incorporated self-employed fell from 5.78 million in 2008 to 5.13 million in 2011.

    • It climbed back to 5.64 million in 2016. So, after eight years, the number of incorporated self-employed remains well short of the 2008 level.

    Unfortunately, the news is even worse when it comes to the larger measure of unincorporated self-employed.

    • The number of unincorporated self-employed declined from 10.59 million in 2006 to 9.36 million in 2014.

    While incorporated data only go back to 2000, unincorporated self-employed numbers date back decades. The 2014 number actually was the lowest since 1986. The level moved back up to slightly to 9.6 million in 2016.

    • During the first six months of 2017, the number of unincorporated self-employed largely was stagnant.

    Millions of Missing Businesses

    As noted in SBE Council’s The State of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, we looked at an array of data and trends, and highlighted the fact that, when considering incorporated and unincorporated self-employed, and the number of employer firms, the U.S. is missing some 3.42 million businesses. And that number is probably a bit conservative. In an earlier SBE Council analysis titled Gap Analysis #3: Millions of Missing Businesses, we also considered the broadest measure of the number of businesses taken from IRS tax returns. With diminished growth in this area, there are some 4.8 million missing businesses.

    Survival Rate for Small Businesses

    “About half of all establishments survive five years or longer… About one-third of establishments survive 10 years or longer.”

    The survival rate for new businesses in their first year has improved recently. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, 79.9% of establishments started in 2014 survived until 2015, the highest share since 2005.

    On Small Business Financing

    • Financing startups: “Startups make heavy use of personal equity and traditional debt, with over half using their own personal savings. Census Bureau data show that employers made greater use of financing than did nonemployers, but also continue to rely on personal savings. Roughly 30% of new nonemployer firms and 7% of employer firms used no startup capital.”

    • Business expansion: “Existing businesses use similar financing vehicles as startups to finance expansion. Personal savings are the most common source of expansion finance, followed by reinvestment of business profits.”

    More Details on Small Businesses

    • Home-based businesses: “The share of businesses that are home- based has remained relatively constant over the past decade, at about 50% of all firms. More specifically, 60.1% of all firms without paid employees are home-based, as are 23.3% of small employer firms and 0.3% of large employer firms.”

    • Franchises: “Overall, 2.9% of firms are franchises. More specifically, 2.3% of nonemployer firms are franchises, as are 5.3% of small employers and 9.6% of large employers.”

    • Family-owned businesses: “About one in five firms (19.3%) are family-owned.”

    Women-Owned Firms

    Women’s Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (See the full report here.)

    • In 2012, women were majority owners of 9.9 million businesses which generated $1.4 trillion in sales and employed over 8.4 million individuals.

    • In addition, another 2.5 million businesses were equally-owned by women and men, and they accounted for another $1.1 trillion in sales and 6.5 million jobs.

    • As majority and joint business owners, women entrepreneurs generated $453 billion in payroll for 14.9 million workers through over 12.3 million businesses.

    The infographic below covers some key data points from the SBA Office of Advocacy’s May 2017 report, which can be accessed here.

    Small business bureau



    Home, Small Business BC, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Small Business BC

    Small business bureau

    Small business bureau

    How We Help

    Small business bureau

    Business Education

    Business theory is one thing. Applying it is another. We teach practical skills and knowledge you can use in the real world.

    Small business bureau

    Expert Advice Help

    Bouncing ideas off of friends and family can be helpful, but it’s no substitute for talking to a qualified expert.

    Small business bureau

    Registration Services

    We can help you register your business and its name, as well as register for GST/PST and prepare it importing and exporting.

    Small business bureau

    Resources Tools

    Small Business BC offers dozens of free checklists, resources and tools designed to help save you time and money.

    Here to Help at Every Step

    Small business bureau

    Just Starting Out?

    You have an idea that could change your industry. Or, at least, your life. At Small Business BC, we can help you make that happen.

    Small business bureau

    Already Growing?

    Have a established, growing business? Our team is here to support you at any stage with affordable education and advice.

    Small business bureau

    Planning to Exit?

    If you’re getting ready to exit your business, we’ll help you access the tools to develop a succession plan or sell your business.

    Success Story

    Meet James Flawith, Lil Worker Safety Gear

    Pitching your business in front of a national audience sounds daunting, but for James Flawith, Founder of Lil Worker Safety Gear, it’s just the latest step in a journey that’s taken him from Comox to living rooms across Canada.

    Latest Articles

    Small business bureau

    How to Keep your Business Safe Online

    It’s never been more important to get your small business online. Canadians love shopping on the internet, racking up an impressive $19.2 billion dollar spend in 2016 alone. This burgeoning frontier presents almost limitless potential for growing your bottom line, but it’s not without its drawbacks. Cyber Attacks Thousands [ ]

    Small business bureau

    Business Resources for Canadian Service Veterans

    Each year, on Remembrance Day, we pause to reflect on the men and women who served Canada and put their lives on the line for our freedom. Canada’s military makes up a significant segment of our society. Combined, the Department of National Defence and Canadian Forces are the single largest [ ]



    Small Business – Entrepreneurship Council, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Facts Data on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    A rundown on key facts, numbers and trends regarding entrepreneurship and small business

    American Business is Overwhelmingly Small Business

    In 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.83 million employer firms in the United States.

    • Firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses

    • Firms with less than 20 workers made up 89.4 percent of businesses.

    • Add in the number of nonemployer businesses – there were 24.3 million in 2015 – then the share of U.S. businesses with less than 20 workers increases to 97.9 percent.

    Among employer C Corporations in 2014, 85.0 percent had fewer than 20 employees, and 99.0 percent had less than 500 workers.

    The Small Business Share of GDP

    “Small businesses continue to be incubators for innovation and employment growth during the current recovery. Small businesses continue to play a vital role in the economy of the United States. They produced 46 percent of the private nonfarm GDP in 2008 (the most recent year for which the source data are available), compared with 48 percent in 2002.”

    Bulk of Job Creation Comes from Small Business

    According to the SBA’s Office of Advocacy:

    “Small businesses accounted for 63.3% of net new jobs from the third quarter of 1992 until the third quarter of 2013.”

    Small Business Share of Employment

    • Employer firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 47.8 percent of private sector payrolls in 2011

    • Employer firms with fewer than 100 workers employed 33.7 percent

    • Employer firms with less than 20 workers employed 17.1 percent

    Small Business and Innovation

    “Small businesses represent about 96% of employer firms in high-patenting manufacturing industries, a percentage that remained constant from 2007 to 2012. However, during the same time period, small businesses’ share of employment, payroll, and receipts increased. This increase was particularly notable in firms that manufactured computers and peripheral equipment, communications equipment, or semiconductors and other electronic components.”

    In addition, a 2008 study by Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks for the Office of Advocacy (“An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size”) found that “small firms are much more likely to develop emerging technologies than are large firms. This is perhaps intuitively reasonable given theories on small firms effecting technological change, but the quantitative data here support this assertion. Specifically, although small firms account for only 8 percent of patents granted, they account for 24 percent of the patents in the top 100 emerging clusters.”

    Small Business and Global Trade

    The U.S. Census Bureau noted the following about small and mid-size businesses in the international trade arena in 2015:

    • “Small- and medium-sized companies (those employing fewer than 500 workers, including number of employees unknown) comprised 97.6 percent of all identified exporters and 97.2 percent of all identified importers.”

    • “Among companies that both exported and imported in 2015, small- and medium-sized companies accounted for 94.3 percent of such companies…”

    • SMEs accounted “for 32.9 percent and 32.0 percent of the known export and import value, respectively.”

    • Among all U.S. manufacturers: “96.4 percent of manufacturing exporters were small- and medium-sized companies and they contributed 20.3 percent of the sector s $798 billion in exports. 93.5 percent of manufacturing importers were small- and medium-sized; they accounted for 14.5 percent of the sector’s $826 billion in imports.”

    • Among wholesalers: “99.1 percent of exporting wholesalers were small- and medium-sized companies; they accounted for 58.2 percent of the sector’s $297 billion in exports. 99.1 percent of wholesaler importers were small- and medium-sized; they contributed 55.4 percent of the sector’s $662 billion in imports.”

    Self-Employed Trending Down

    Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the level of entrepreneurship actually has declined in recent years. That is, the number of self-employed in the U.S. has dropped notably.

    • Incorporated self-employed fell from 5.78 million in 2008 to 5.13 million in 2011.

    • It climbed back to 5.64 million in 2016. So, after eight years, the number of incorporated self-employed remains well short of the 2008 level.

    Unfortunately, the news is even worse when it comes to the larger measure of unincorporated self-employed.

    • The number of unincorporated self-employed declined from 10.59 million in 2006 to 9.36 million in 2014.

    While incorporated data only go back to 2000, unincorporated self-employed numbers date back decades. The 2014 number actually was the lowest since 1986. The level moved back up to slightly to 9.6 million in 2016.

    • During the first six months of 2017, the number of unincorporated self-employed largely was stagnant.

    Millions of Missing Businesses

    As noted in SBE Council’s The State of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, we looked at an array of data and trends, and highlighted the fact that, when considering incorporated and unincorporated self-employed, and the number of employer firms, the U.S. is missing some 3.42 million businesses. And that number is probably a bit conservative. In an earlier SBE Council analysis titled Gap Analysis #3: Millions of Missing Businesses, we also considered the broadest measure of the number of businesses taken from IRS tax returns. With diminished growth in this area, there are some 4.8 million missing businesses.

    Survival Rate for Small Businesses

    “About half of all establishments survive five years or longer… About one-third of establishments survive 10 years or longer.”

    The survival rate for new businesses in their first year has improved recently. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, 79.9% of establishments started in 2014 survived until 2015, the highest share since 2005.

    On Small Business Financing

    • Financing startups: “Startups make heavy use of personal equity and traditional debt, with over half using their own personal savings. Census Bureau data show that employers made greater use of financing than did nonemployers, but also continue to rely on personal savings. Roughly 30% of new nonemployer firms and 7% of employer firms used no startup capital.”

    • Business expansion: “Existing businesses use similar financing vehicles as startups to finance expansion. Personal savings are the most common source of expansion finance, followed by reinvestment of business profits.”

    More Details on Small Businesses

    • Home-based businesses: “The share of businesses that are home- based has remained relatively constant over the past decade, at about 50% of all firms. More specifically, 60.1% of all firms without paid employees are home-based, as are 23.3% of small employer firms and 0.3% of large employer firms.”

    • Franchises: “Overall, 2.9% of firms are franchises. More specifically, 2.3% of nonemployer firms are franchises, as are 5.3% of small employers and 9.6% of large employers.”

    • Family-owned businesses: “About one in five firms (19.3%) are family-owned.”

    Women-Owned Firms

    Women’s Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (See the full report here.)

    • In 2012, women were majority owners of 9.9 million businesses which generated $1.4 trillion in sales and employed over 8.4 million individuals.

    • In addition, another 2.5 million businesses were equally-owned by women and men, and they accounted for another $1.1 trillion in sales and 6.5 million jobs.

    • As majority and joint business owners, women entrepreneurs generated $453 billion in payroll for 14.9 million workers through over 12.3 million businesses.

    The infographic below covers some key data points from the SBA Office of Advocacy’s May 2017 report, which can be accessed here.

    Small business bureau



    Small Business – Entrepreneurship Council, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Facts Data on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    A rundown on key facts, numbers and trends regarding entrepreneurship and small business

    American Business is Overwhelmingly Small Business

    In 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.83 million employer firms in the United States.

    • Firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses

    • Firms with less than 20 workers made up 89.4 percent of businesses.

    • Add in the number of nonemployer businesses – there were 24.3 million in 2015 – then the share of U.S. businesses with less than 20 workers increases to 97.9 percent.

    Among employer C Corporations in 2014, 85.0 percent had fewer than 20 employees, and 99.0 percent had less than 500 workers.

    The Small Business Share of GDP

    “Small businesses continue to be incubators for innovation and employment growth during the current recovery. Small businesses continue to play a vital role in the economy of the United States. They produced 46 percent of the private nonfarm GDP in 2008 (the most recent year for which the source data are available), compared with 48 percent in 2002.”

    Bulk of Job Creation Comes from Small Business

    According to the SBA’s Office of Advocacy:

    “Small businesses accounted for 63.3% of net new jobs from the third quarter of 1992 until the third quarter of 2013.”

    Small Business Share of Employment

    • Employer firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 47.8 percent of private sector payrolls in 2011

    • Employer firms with fewer than 100 workers employed 33.7 percent

    • Employer firms with less than 20 workers employed 17.1 percent

    Small Business and Innovation

    “Small businesses represent about 96% of employer firms in high-patenting manufacturing industries, a percentage that remained constant from 2007 to 2012. However, during the same time period, small businesses’ share of employment, payroll, and receipts increased. This increase was particularly notable in firms that manufactured computers and peripheral equipment, communications equipment, or semiconductors and other electronic components.”

    In addition, a 2008 study by Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks for the Office of Advocacy (“An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size”) found that “small firms are much more likely to develop emerging technologies than are large firms. This is perhaps intuitively reasonable given theories on small firms effecting technological change, but the quantitative data here support this assertion. Specifically, although small firms account for only 8 percent of patents granted, they account for 24 percent of the patents in the top 100 emerging clusters.”

    Small Business and Global Trade

    The U.S. Census Bureau noted the following about small and mid-size businesses in the international trade arena in 2015:

    • “Small- and medium-sized companies (those employing fewer than 500 workers, including number of employees unknown) comprised 97.6 percent of all identified exporters and 97.2 percent of all identified importers.”

    • “Among companies that both exported and imported in 2015, small- and medium-sized companies accounted for 94.3 percent of such companies…”

    • SMEs accounted “for 32.9 percent and 32.0 percent of the known export and import value, respectively.”

    • Among all U.S. manufacturers: “96.4 percent of manufacturing exporters were small- and medium-sized companies and they contributed 20.3 percent of the sector s $798 billion in exports. 93.5 percent of manufacturing importers were small- and medium-sized; they accounted for 14.5 percent of the sector’s $826 billion in imports.”

    • Among wholesalers: “99.1 percent of exporting wholesalers were small- and medium-sized companies; they accounted for 58.2 percent of the sector’s $297 billion in exports. 99.1 percent of wholesaler importers were small- and medium-sized; they contributed 55.4 percent of the sector’s $662 billion in imports.”

    Self-Employed Trending Down

    Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the level of entrepreneurship actually has declined in recent years. That is, the number of self-employed in the U.S. has dropped notably.

    • Incorporated self-employed fell from 5.78 million in 2008 to 5.13 million in 2011.

    • It climbed back to 5.64 million in 2016. So, after eight years, the number of incorporated self-employed remains well short of the 2008 level.

    Unfortunately, the news is even worse when it comes to the larger measure of unincorporated self-employed.

    • The number of unincorporated self-employed declined from 10.59 million in 2006 to 9.36 million in 2014.

    While incorporated data only go back to 2000, unincorporated self-employed numbers date back decades. The 2014 number actually was the lowest since 1986. The level moved back up to slightly to 9.6 million in 2016.

    • During the first six months of 2017, the number of unincorporated self-employed largely was stagnant.

    Millions of Missing Businesses

    As noted in SBE Council’s The State of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, we looked at an array of data and trends, and highlighted the fact that, when considering incorporated and unincorporated self-employed, and the number of employer firms, the U.S. is missing some 3.42 million businesses. And that number is probably a bit conservative. In an earlier SBE Council analysis titled Gap Analysis #3: Millions of Missing Businesses, we also considered the broadest measure of the number of businesses taken from IRS tax returns. With diminished growth in this area, there are some 4.8 million missing businesses.

    Survival Rate for Small Businesses

    “About half of all establishments survive five years or longer… About one-third of establishments survive 10 years or longer.”

    The survival rate for new businesses in their first year has improved recently. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, 79.9% of establishments started in 2014 survived until 2015, the highest share since 2005.

    On Small Business Financing

    • Financing startups: “Startups make heavy use of personal equity and traditional debt, with over half using their own personal savings. Census Bureau data show that employers made greater use of financing than did nonemployers, but also continue to rely on personal savings. Roughly 30% of new nonemployer firms and 7% of employer firms used no startup capital.”

    • Business expansion: “Existing businesses use similar financing vehicles as startups to finance expansion. Personal savings are the most common source of expansion finance, followed by reinvestment of business profits.”

    More Details on Small Businesses

    • Home-based businesses: “The share of businesses that are home- based has remained relatively constant over the past decade, at about 50% of all firms. More specifically, 60.1% of all firms without paid employees are home-based, as are 23.3% of small employer firms and 0.3% of large employer firms.”

    • Franchises: “Overall, 2.9% of firms are franchises. More specifically, 2.3% of nonemployer firms are franchises, as are 5.3% of small employers and 9.6% of large employers.”

    • Family-owned businesses: “About one in five firms (19.3%) are family-owned.”

    Women-Owned Firms

    Women’s Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (See the full report here.)

    • In 2012, women were majority owners of 9.9 million businesses which generated $1.4 trillion in sales and employed over 8.4 million individuals.

    • In addition, another 2.5 million businesses were equally-owned by women and men, and they accounted for another $1.1 trillion in sales and 6.5 million jobs.

    • As majority and joint business owners, women entrepreneurs generated $453 billion in payroll for 14.9 million workers through over 12.3 million businesses.

    The infographic below covers some key data points from the SBA Office of Advocacy’s May 2017 report, which can be accessed here.

    Small business bureau



    Home, Small Business BC, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Small Business BC

    Small business bureau

    Small business bureau

    How We Help

    Small business bureau

    Business Education

    Business theory is one thing. Applying it is another. We teach practical skills and knowledge you can use in the real world.

    Small business bureau

    Expert Advice Help

    Bouncing ideas off of friends and family can be helpful, but it’s no substitute for talking to a qualified expert.

    Small business bureau

    Registration Services

    We can help you register your business and its name, as well as register for GST/PST and prepare it importing and exporting.

    Small business bureau

    Resources Tools

    Small Business BC offers dozens of free checklists, resources and tools designed to help save you time and money.

    Here to Help at Every Step

    Small business bureau

    Just Starting Out?

    You have an idea that could change your industry. Or, at least, your life. At Small Business BC, we can help you make that happen.

    Small business bureau

    Already Growing?

    Have a established, growing business? Our team is here to support you at any stage with affordable education and advice.

    Small business bureau

    Planning to Exit?

    If you’re getting ready to exit your business, we’ll help you access the tools to develop a succession plan or sell your business.

    Success Story

    Meet James Flawith, Lil Worker Safety Gear

    Pitching your business in front of a national audience sounds daunting, but for James Flawith, Founder of Lil Worker Safety Gear, it’s just the latest step in a journey that’s taken him from Comox to living rooms across Canada.

    Latest Articles

    Small business bureau

    How to Keep your Business Safe Online

    It’s never been more important to get your small business online. Canadians love shopping on the internet, racking up an impressive $19.2 billion dollar spend in 2016 alone. This burgeoning frontier presents almost limitless potential for growing your bottom line, but it’s not without its drawbacks. Cyber Attacks Thousands [ ]

    Small business bureau

    Business Resources for Canadian Service Veterans

    Each year, on Remembrance Day, we pause to reflect on the men and women who served Canada and put their lives on the line for our freedom. Canada’s military makes up a significant segment of our society. Combined, the Department of National Defence and Canadian Forces are the single largest [ ]



    Nevada Small Business Development Center, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Nevada Small Business Development Center College of Business A partner in The Business Services Group

    The Nevada Small Business Development Center is a statewide business assistance outreach program of the University of Nevada, Reno, College of Business. We provide a wide variety of technical assistance to support Nevada Business.

    The purpose of the Nevada Small Business Development Center is to guide and assist entrepreneurs in starting and growing their businesses in today’s dynamic market.

    • Small business bureau
    • Small business bureau
    • Small business bureau
    • Small business bureau
    • Small business bureau
    • Small business bureau

    Thinking about starting a business?

    Inside

    Business Blog

    Made In Nevada

    The Made in Nevada program is the longest running marketing cooperative in the Silver State. Originally established under Governor. Read More

    Nevada SBDC State Director

    “Small business is an economic powerhouse that knows you by your first name.” – NFIB. Nationally, small businesses continue. Read More

    The Most Critical Steps in Preparing for a Successful Business

    By: Debra Ward, Marketing Consultant, Dream Weaver Marketing Starting a new business is fun, but it takes careful planning. Read More

    UPCOMING

    Training

    TECH TRAINING: Cybersecurity

    Cybersecurity refers to the preventative techniques used to protect the integrity of networks, programs and data

    WEBINAR SERIES: Where’s the Contract? State and Local Government Contracting: Buying and Selling Perspectives

    Join the Nevada Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC), Procurement Outreach Program (POP) to learn more about

    Make More Money from your Website

    If you re not maximizing your revenue through your website, learn how to create this successful plan

    Small business bureau

    NSBDC

    Highlighted Clients

    Stage Sell

    I thought it would be rewarding to help people effectively prepare their homes for sale,” said Cheryl of her business. Home staging is the art of decorating and photographing rooms in ways that best show the space and appeal to the greatest number of potential buyers. Read More

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    Small business bureau

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  • Small business bureau
  • Small business bureau

    The Nevada Small Business Development Center is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least two weeks in advance. Contact the State office of the Nevada Small Business Development Center at (800) 240-7094.

    Nevada SBDC es financiado en parte a través de un Acuerdo Cooperativo con la Administración de Pequeños Negocios (SBA) de los Estados Unidos. Todos los servicios se extienden al público sobre una base no discriminatoria. Las acomodaciones razonables para las personas con discapacidades mentales o físicas se harán, si se solicitan con al menos dos semanas de anticipación. Comuníquese con la oficina del estado de Nevada SBDC al 1-800-240-7094 para hacer arreglos. SBA no puede respaldar ningún producto, opinión o servicio de ninguna institución o actividad externa.

    All SBDC programs and services are extended to the public on a non-discriminatory basis. Language assistance services for clients with limited English proficiency will be provided.

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    Copyright © 2017 Nevada Small Business Development Center



    Small Business – Entrepreneurship Council, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


    Facts Data on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

    A rundown on key facts, numbers and trends regarding entrepreneurship and small business

    American Business is Overwhelmingly Small Business

    In 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.83 million employer firms in the United States.

    • Firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses

    • Firms with less than 20 workers made up 89.4 percent of businesses.

    • Add in the number of nonemployer businesses – there were 24.3 million in 2015 – then the share of U.S. businesses with less than 20 workers increases to 97.9 percent.

    Among employer C Corporations in 2014, 85.0 percent had fewer than 20 employees, and 99.0 percent had less than 500 workers.

    The Small Business Share of GDP

    “Small businesses continue to be incubators for innovation and employment growth during the current recovery. Small businesses continue to play a vital role in the economy of the United States. They produced 46 percent of the private nonfarm GDP in 2008 (the most recent year for which the source data are available), compared with 48 percent in 2002.”

    Bulk of Job Creation Comes from Small Business

    According to the SBA’s Office of Advocacy:

    “Small businesses accounted for 63.3% of net new jobs from the third quarter of 1992 until the third quarter of 2013.”

    Small Business Share of Employment

    • Employer firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 47.8 percent of private sector payrolls in 2011

    • Employer firms with fewer than 100 workers employed 33.7 percent

    • Employer firms with less than 20 workers employed 17.1 percent

    Small Business and Innovation

    “Small businesses represent about 96% of employer firms in high-patenting manufacturing industries, a percentage that remained constant from 2007 to 2012. However, during the same time period, small businesses’ share of employment, payroll, and receipts increased. This increase was particularly notable in firms that manufactured computers and peripheral equipment, communications equipment, or semiconductors and other electronic components.”

    In addition, a 2008 study by Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks for the Office of Advocacy (“An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size”) found that “small firms are much more likely to develop emerging technologies than are large firms. This is perhaps intuitively reasonable given theories on small firms effecting technological change, but the quantitative data here support this assertion. Specifically, although small firms account for only 8 percent of patents granted, they account for 24 percent of the patents in the top 100 emerging clusters.”

    Small Business and Global Trade

    The U.S. Census Bureau noted the following about small and mid-size businesses in the international trade arena in 2015:

    • “Small- and medium-sized companies (those employing fewer than 500 workers, including number of employees unknown) comprised 97.6 percent of all identified exporters and 97.2 percent of all identified importers.”

    • “Among companies that both exported and imported in 2015, small- and medium-sized companies accounted for 94.3 percent of such companies…”

    • SMEs accounted “for 32.9 percent and 32.0 percent of the known export and import value, respectively.”

    • Among all U.S. manufacturers: “96.4 percent of manufacturing exporters were small- and medium-sized companies and they contributed 20.3 percent of the sector s $798 billion in exports. 93.5 percent of manufacturing importers were small- and medium-sized; they accounted for 14.5 percent of the sector’s $826 billion in imports.”

    • Among wholesalers: “99.1 percent of exporting wholesalers were small- and medium-sized companies; they accounted for 58.2 percent of the sector’s $297 billion in exports. 99.1 percent of wholesaler importers were small- and medium-sized; they contributed 55.4 percent of the sector’s $662 billion in imports.”

    Self-Employed Trending Down

    Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the level of entrepreneurship actually has declined in recent years. That is, the number of self-employed in the U.S. has dropped notably.

    • Incorporated self-employed fell from 5.78 million in 2008 to 5.13 million in 2011.

    • It climbed back to 5.64 million in 2016. So, after eight years, the number of incorporated self-employed remains well short of the 2008 level.

    Unfortunately, the news is even worse when it comes to the larger measure of unincorporated self-employed.

    • The number of unincorporated self-employed declined from 10.59 million in 2006 to 9.36 million in 2014.

    While incorporated data only go back to 2000, unincorporated self-employed numbers date back decades. The 2014 number actually was the lowest since 1986. The level moved back up to slightly to 9.6 million in 2016.

    • During the first six months of 2017, the number of unincorporated self-employed largely was stagnant.

    Millions of Missing Businesses

    As noted in SBE Council’s The State of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, we looked at an array of data and trends, and highlighted the fact that, when considering incorporated and unincorporated self-employed, and the number of employer firms, the U.S. is missing some 3.42 million businesses. And that number is probably a bit conservative. In an earlier SBE Council analysis titled Gap Analysis #3: Millions of Missing Businesses, we also considered the broadest measure of the number of businesses taken from IRS tax returns. With diminished growth in this area, there are some 4.8 million missing businesses.

    Survival Rate for Small Businesses

    “About half of all establishments survive five years or longer… About one-third of establishments survive 10 years or longer.”

    The survival rate for new businesses in their first year has improved recently. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, 79.9% of establishments started in 2014 survived until 2015, the highest share since 2005.

    On Small Business Financing

    • Financing startups: “Startups make heavy use of personal equity and traditional debt, with over half using their own personal savings. Census Bureau data show that employers made greater use of financing than did nonemployers, but also continue to rely on personal savings. Roughly 30% of new nonemployer firms and 7% of employer firms used no startup capital.”

    • Business expansion: “Existing businesses use similar financing vehicles as startups to finance expansion. Personal savings are the most common source of expansion finance, followed by reinvestment of business profits.”

    More Details on Small Businesses

    • Home-based businesses: “The share of businesses that are home- based has remained relatively constant over the past decade, at about 50% of all firms. More specifically, 60.1% of all firms without paid employees are home-based, as are 23.3% of small employer firms and 0.3% of large employer firms.”

    • Franchises: “Overall, 2.9% of firms are franchises. More specifically, 2.3% of nonemployer firms are franchises, as are 5.3% of small employers and 9.6% of large employers.”

    • Family-owned businesses: “About one in five firms (19.3%) are family-owned.”

    Women-Owned Firms

    Women’s Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (See the full report here.)

    • In 2012, women were majority owners of 9.9 million businesses which generated $1.4 trillion in sales and employed over 8.4 million individuals.

    • In addition, another 2.5 million businesses were equally-owned by women and men, and they accounted for another $1.1 trillion in sales and 6.5 million jobs.

    • As majority and joint business owners, women entrepreneurs generated $453 billion in payroll for 14.9 million workers through over 12.3 million businesses.

    The infographic below covers some key data points from the SBA Office of Advocacy’s May 2017 report, which can be accessed here.

    Small business bureau



    Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating #business #opportunity


    #better business bureau

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    Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating

    The Better Business Bureau on Tuesday briskly refuted a number of statements that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made about Trump University, the now-defunct real estate seminar provider that many students allege was a scam.

    In last Thursday’s Republican debate, the candidate defended Trump University despite the multiple lawsuits brought by former students and the state of New York.

    Challenged by Fox News moderator Megyn Kelly about Trump University’s D-minus rating from the Better Business Bureau, Trump said that “right now it is an A.”

    During a commercial break, Trump was caught on camera presenting the debate hosts with a piece of paper that he said showed that rating. “The Better Business Bureau just sent it,” Trump can be heard telling Fox News moderator Bret Baier. “This just came in, we just got it.”

    “The BBB did not send a document of any kind to the Republican debate site last Thursday evening,” the nonprofit organization said on Tuesday. “The document presented to debate moderators did not come from BBB that night.”

    As to Trump’s basic claim, the watchdog group said, “Trump University does not currently have an A rating with BBB. The BBB Business Review for this company has continually been ‘No Rating’ since September 2015. Prior to that, it fluctuated between D- and A+.”

    Following the debate on Thursday, Trump tweeted what he said was the official A rating for the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, a later name for Trump University.

    On Tuesday, the Better Business Bureau said, “The document posted on social media on Thursday night was not a current BBB Business Review of Trump University. It appeared to be part of a Business Review from 2014.”

    Furthermore, the nonprofit stated, “Trump University has never been a BBB Accredited Business. The document handed to the debate moderators on Thursday night could not have been an actual ‘Better Business Bureau accreditation notice’ for this business.”

    Here’s the current review of the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative.

    Better Business Bureau

    Not only did the Better Business Bureau refute Trump’s claims about Trump University’s current grade; it also refuted his claim that the enterprise has “a 98 percent approval rating from the people who took the course [because] people like it. many did tremendously well, and made a lot of money.”

    Here’s how the bureau tells it: “During the period when Trump University appeared to be active in the marketplace, BBB received multiple customer complaints about this business. These complaints affected the Trump University BBB rating, which was as low as D- in 2010.”

    How did it ever have an A rating?

    The company closed in 2011, and after that, the Better Business Bureau said, “no new complaints were reported.” Complaints that are more than three years old “automatically rolled off of the Business Review, [and] over time, Trump University’s BBB rating went to an A in July 2014 and then to an A+ in January 2015.”

    Trump, however, claimed the opposite was true. He said the Better Business Bureau simply hadn’t had enough information about Trump U, and that’s why it received a D-minus. “Before they had the information,” the program scored poorly, he said, but “once they had the information. it is right now an A.”

    More than 5,000 people are suing Trump and Trump University in California, where a class action suit alleges that many students spent more than $30,000 on what they were told would be a real estate investment mentorship, personally designed and overseen by Trump.

    Watch the real estate mogul’s promotional video for Trump University:

    In fact, the former students allege that Trump played no part in designing the course, choosing the teachers or mentoring students.

    A second case brought by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman was cleared by an appeals court to move forward last week. This means voters are likely to hear a lot more about Trump University in the coming months.

    The candidate tried to play down the seriousness of the allegations on Thursday, yelling, “It’s just a minor case! It’s a minor case!” over the voices of debate moderators.

    On Monday, Trump also released a video (see below ) in which he singled out two people who asserted they’d been scammed by his seminar company. He accused them of saying “horrible things” and warned “we’re looking” for a third person.

    A spokeswoman for Trump’s campaign and a lawyer for Trump’s business both declined to comment on the Better Business Bureau’s statement.



    Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau #small #business


    #small business bureau

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    Concordia University

    Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau

    Our vision is to provide high quality, professional business consulting services to organizations in the Greater Montreal area at competitive rates. The Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau (CSBCB) has the services and skilled staff to meet the diverse needs of today’s entrepreneurs and local business community. Collectively, the Bureau’s consultants bring over 35 years of real-world experience from various industries including consumer and specialty goods, travel and lodging, telecom, banking and technology, healthcare, energy, real estate, and logistics.

    The Bureau adopts a multi-disciplinary and cross-functional approach to solving individualized client needs, bringing together our collective expertise in finance, marketing, strategy, management, operations and information technology into our decision making process to provide thorough analysis and comprehensive recommendations. We utilize the invaluable expert council from the highly respected and internationally acclaimed faculty members of the John Molson School of Business. We have access to market research databases, business related research studies and statistics covering almost every industry.

    Whether you are looking to launch your business and require a business plan, or already have an established business and are looking for market analysis for an expansion plan, or simply need advice for your business, the Bureau can help you in achieving your vision.

    The CSBCB is managed by a select group of five MBA students from the John Molson School of Business. The Bureau operates under the mentorship of Alexandra Dawson. Associate Professor in the Department of Management.