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Small Business – Entrepreneurship Council, small business bureau.#Small #business #bureau


Facts Data on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

A rundown on key facts, numbers and trends regarding entrepreneurship and small business

American Business is Overwhelmingly Small Business

In 2014, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.83 million employer firms in the United States.

• Firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses

• Firms with less than 20 workers made up 89.4 percent of businesses.

• Add in the number of nonemployer businesses – there were 24.3 million in 2015 – then the share of U.S. businesses with less than 20 workers increases to 97.9 percent.

Among employer C Corporations in 2014, 85.0 percent had fewer than 20 employees, and 99.0 percent had less than 500 workers.

The Small Business Share of GDP

“Small businesses continue to be incubators for innovation and employment growth during the current recovery. Small businesses continue to play a vital role in the economy of the United States. They produced 46 percent of the private nonfarm GDP in 2008 (the most recent year for which the source data are available), compared with 48 percent in 2002.”

Bulk of Job Creation Comes from Small Business

According to the SBA’s Office of Advocacy:

“Small businesses accounted for 63.3% of net new jobs from the third quarter of 1992 until the third quarter of 2013.”

Small Business Share of Employment

• Employer firms with fewer than 500 workers employed 47.8 percent of private sector payrolls in 2011

• Employer firms with fewer than 100 workers employed 33.7 percent

• Employer firms with less than 20 workers employed 17.1 percent

Small Business and Innovation

“Small businesses represent about 96% of employer firms in high-patenting manufacturing industries, a percentage that remained constant from 2007 to 2012. However, during the same time period, small businesses’ share of employment, payroll, and receipts increased. This increase was particularly notable in firms that manufactured computers and peripheral equipment, communications equipment, or semiconductors and other electronic components.”

In addition, a 2008 study by Anthony Breitzman and Diana Hicks for the Office of Advocacy (“An Analysis of Small Business Patents by Industry and Firm Size”) found that “small firms are much more likely to develop emerging technologies than are large firms. This is perhaps intuitively reasonable given theories on small firms effecting technological change, but the quantitative data here support this assertion. Specifically, although small firms account for only 8 percent of patents granted, they account for 24 percent of the patents in the top 100 emerging clusters.”

Small Business and Global Trade

The U.S. Census Bureau noted the following about small and mid-size businesses in the international trade arena in 2015:

• “Small- and medium-sized companies (those employing fewer than 500 workers, including number of employees unknown) comprised 97.6 percent of all identified exporters and 97.2 percent of all identified importers.”

• “Among companies that both exported and imported in 2015, small- and medium-sized companies accounted for 94.3 percent of such companies…”

• SMEs accounted “for 32.9 percent and 32.0 percent of the known export and import value, respectively.”

• Among all U.S. manufacturers: “96.4 percent of manufacturing exporters were small- and medium-sized companies and they contributed 20.3 percent of the sector s $798 billion in exports. 93.5 percent of manufacturing importers were small- and medium-sized; they accounted for 14.5 percent of the sector’s $826 billion in imports.”

• Among wholesalers: “99.1 percent of exporting wholesalers were small- and medium-sized companies; they accounted for 58.2 percent of the sector’s $297 billion in exports. 99.1 percent of wholesaler importers were small- and medium-sized; they contributed 55.4 percent of the sector’s $662 billion in imports.”

Self-Employed Trending Down

Based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the level of entrepreneurship actually has declined in recent years. That is, the number of self-employed in the U.S. has dropped notably.

• Incorporated self-employed fell from 5.78 million in 2008 to 5.13 million in 2011.

• It climbed back to 5.64 million in 2016. So, after eight years, the number of incorporated self-employed remains well short of the 2008 level.

Unfortunately, the news is even worse when it comes to the larger measure of unincorporated self-employed.

• The number of unincorporated self-employed declined from 10.59 million in 2006 to 9.36 million in 2014.

While incorporated data only go back to 2000, unincorporated self-employed numbers date back decades. The 2014 number actually was the lowest since 1986. The level moved back up to slightly to 9.6 million in 2016.

• During the first six months of 2017, the number of unincorporated self-employed largely was stagnant.

Millions of Missing Businesses

As noted in SBE Council’s The State of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, we looked at an array of data and trends, and highlighted the fact that, when considering incorporated and unincorporated self-employed, and the number of employer firms, the U.S. is missing some 3.42 million businesses. And that number is probably a bit conservative. In an earlier SBE Council analysis titled Gap Analysis #3: Millions of Missing Businesses, we also considered the broadest measure of the number of businesses taken from IRS tax returns. With diminished growth in this area, there are some 4.8 million missing businesses.

Survival Rate for Small Businesses

“About half of all establishments survive five years or longer… About one-third of establishments survive 10 years or longer.”

The survival rate for new businesses in their first year has improved recently. According to the SBA Office of Advocacy, 79.9% of establishments started in 2014 survived until 2015, the highest share since 2005.

On Small Business Financing

• Financing startups: “Startups make heavy use of personal equity and traditional debt, with over half using their own personal savings. Census Bureau data show that employers made greater use of financing than did nonemployers, but also continue to rely on personal savings. Roughly 30% of new nonemployer firms and 7% of employer firms used no startup capital.”

• Business expansion: “Existing businesses use similar financing vehicles as startups to finance expansion. Personal savings are the most common source of expansion finance, followed by reinvestment of business profits.”

More Details on Small Businesses

• Home-based businesses: “The share of businesses that are home- based has remained relatively constant over the past decade, at about 50% of all firms. More specifically, 60.1% of all firms without paid employees are home-based, as are 23.3% of small employer firms and 0.3% of large employer firms.”

• Franchises: “Overall, 2.9% of firms are franchises. More specifically, 2.3% of nonemployer firms are franchises, as are 5.3% of small employers and 9.6% of large employers.”

• Family-owned businesses: “About one in five firms (19.3%) are family-owned.”

Women-Owned Firms

Women’s Business Ownership: Data from the 2012 Survey of Business Owners (See the full report here.)

• In 2012, women were majority owners of 9.9 million businesses which generated $1.4 trillion in sales and employed over 8.4 million individuals.

• In addition, another 2.5 million businesses were equally-owned by women and men, and they accounted for another $1.1 trillion in sales and 6.5 million jobs.

• As majority and joint business owners, women entrepreneurs generated $453 billion in payroll for 14.9 million workers through over 12.3 million businesses.

The infographic below covers some key data points from the SBA Office of Advocacy’s May 2017 report, which can be accessed here.

Small business bureau



Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating #business #opportunity


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Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Trump University Rating

The Better Business Bureau on Tuesday briskly refuted a number of statements that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made about Trump University, the now-defunct real estate seminar provider that many students allege was a scam.

In last Thursday’s Republican debate, the candidate defended Trump University despite the multiple lawsuits brought by former students and the state of New York.

Challenged by Fox News moderator Megyn Kelly about Trump University’s D-minus rating from the Better Business Bureau, Trump said that “right now it is an A.”

During a commercial break, Trump was caught on camera presenting the debate hosts with a piece of paper that he said showed that rating. “The Better Business Bureau just sent it,” Trump can be heard telling Fox News moderator Bret Baier. “This just came in, we just got it.”

“The BBB did not send a document of any kind to the Republican debate site last Thursday evening,” the nonprofit organization said on Tuesday. “The document presented to debate moderators did not come from BBB that night.”

As to Trump’s basic claim, the watchdog group said, “Trump University does not currently have an A rating with BBB. The BBB Business Review for this company has continually been ‘No Rating’ since September 2015. Prior to that, it fluctuated between D- and A+.”

Following the debate on Thursday, Trump tweeted what he said was the official A rating for the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, a later name for Trump University.

On Tuesday, the Better Business Bureau said, “The document posted on social media on Thursday night was not a current BBB Business Review of Trump University. It appeared to be part of a Business Review from 2014.”

Furthermore, the nonprofit stated, “Trump University has never been a BBB Accredited Business. The document handed to the debate moderators on Thursday night could not have been an actual ‘Better Business Bureau accreditation notice’ for this business.”

Here’s the current review of the Trump Entrepreneur Initiative.

Better Business Bureau

Not only did the Better Business Bureau refute Trump’s claims about Trump University’s current grade; it also refuted his claim that the enterprise has “a 98 percent approval rating from the people who took the course [because] people like it. many did tremendously well, and made a lot of money.”

Here’s how the bureau tells it: “During the period when Trump University appeared to be active in the marketplace, BBB received multiple customer complaints about this business. These complaints affected the Trump University BBB rating, which was as low as D- in 2010.”

How did it ever have an A rating?

The company closed in 2011, and after that, the Better Business Bureau said, “no new complaints were reported.” Complaints that are more than three years old “automatically rolled off of the Business Review, [and] over time, Trump University’s BBB rating went to an A in July 2014 and then to an A+ in January 2015.”

Trump, however, claimed the opposite was true. He said the Better Business Bureau simply hadn’t had enough information about Trump U, and that’s why it received a D-minus. “Before they had the information,” the program scored poorly, he said, but “once they had the information. it is right now an A.”

More than 5,000 people are suing Trump and Trump University in California, where a class action suit alleges that many students spent more than $30,000 on what they were told would be a real estate investment mentorship, personally designed and overseen by Trump.

Watch the real estate mogul’s promotional video for Trump University:

In fact, the former students allege that Trump played no part in designing the course, choosing the teachers or mentoring students.

A second case brought by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman was cleared by an appeals court to move forward last week. This means voters are likely to hear a lot more about Trump University in the coming months.

The candidate tried to play down the seriousness of the allegations on Thursday, yelling, “It’s just a minor case! It’s a minor case!” over the voices of debate moderators.

On Monday, Trump also released a video (see below ) in which he singled out two people who asserted they’d been scammed by his seminar company. He accused them of saying “horrible things” and warned “we’re looking” for a third person.

A spokeswoman for Trump’s campaign and a lawyer for Trump’s business both declined to comment on the Better Business Bureau’s statement.



Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau #small #business


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Concordia University

Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau

Our vision is to provide high quality, professional business consulting services to organizations in the Greater Montreal area at competitive rates. The Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau (CSBCB) has the services and skilled staff to meet the diverse needs of today’s entrepreneurs and local business community. Collectively, the Bureau’s consultants bring over 35 years of real-world experience from various industries including consumer and specialty goods, travel and lodging, telecom, banking and technology, healthcare, energy, real estate, and logistics.

The Bureau adopts a multi-disciplinary and cross-functional approach to solving individualized client needs, bringing together our collective expertise in finance, marketing, strategy, management, operations and information technology into our decision making process to provide thorough analysis and comprehensive recommendations. We utilize the invaluable expert council from the highly respected and internationally acclaimed faculty members of the John Molson School of Business. We have access to market research databases, business related research studies and statistics covering almost every industry.

Whether you are looking to launch your business and require a business plan, or already have an established business and are looking for market analysis for an expansion plan, or simply need advice for your business, the Bureau can help you in achieving your vision.

The CSBCB is managed by a select group of five MBA students from the John Molson School of Business. The Bureau operates under the mentorship of Alexandra Dawson. Associate Professor in the Department of Management.



Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Our Ratings #free #business #templates


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Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Our Ratings

The Council of Better Business Bureaus is calling out Donald Trump for what appears to have been a brazen effort to mislead the Fox News hosts who moderated last week’s Republican presidential debate, as well as the millions of Americans who tuned in to watch last Thursday night.

During the debate, the moderators and Trump’s opponent, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, brought up the subject of Trump University, a now-defunct business that Trump established to sell supposedly educational courses and seminars on entrepreneurship. Trump University is currently being sued for fraud by numerous former students, who said that they were pressured to take on debt to pay for tens of thousands of dollars in fees and that the company did not deliver the type of educational experience it promised.

Related: Trump Numbers Are Falling – How Far Can They Go?

On stage last week, Trump angrily challenged criticism of Trump University, insisting that the organization had a “98 percent” approval rating among its students.

But it was when Rubio brought up the company’s D- grade from the Better Business Bureau that Trump really started to get creative.

He conceded that at one point the company did have a D- rating from the Better Business Bureau, but he said the rating was poor only because Trump University hadn’t bothered to submit data to the BBB. He insisted that the grade was subsequently “elevated to an A” once the data was supplied.

“The only reason that is was a D was because we didn’t care — we didn’t give them the information. ” Trump said. “When they got the information it became an A.”

Related: Here’s Why Donald Trump’s Lies May Be Good for U.S. Politics

During a commercial break, Trump was given a fax from his staff, which he handed to Fox moderator Bret Baier. He later posted the document on Facebook. It appeared to be a BBB Business Review giving Trump University (actually, Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, after a 2011 name change) an A grade.

At least one news organization reported, at the time, that the document appeared to have been faxed to the Fox News set by the BBB itself.

On Tuesday, the Council of Better Business Bureaus issued a detailed statement setting the record straight.

“BBB did not send a document of any kind to the Republican debate site last Thursday evening,” it read. “The document presented to debate moderators did not come from BBB that night.”

It continued, “Trump University does not currently have an A rating with BBB. The BBB Business Review for this company has continually been “No Rating” since September 2015. Prior to that, it fluctuated between D- and A+. The document posted on social media on Thursday night was not a current BBB Business Review of Trump University. It appeared to be part of a Business Review from 2014.”

Related: Irony Alert: Trump Is Upset that Ted Cruz Is Lying

More damning, though, was the BBB’s account of how Trump University’s rating went from a D- to an A. The BBB said that, despite Trump’s claims to the contrary, the rating was never increased as a result of new information received from the company.

What happened is that as Trump University failed as a business, it stopped attracting new students, and with no new students, there were no more complaints filed to the BBB.

“During the period when Trump University appeared to be active in the marketplace, BBB received multiple customer complaints about this business,” the statement said. “These complaints affected the Trump University BBB rating, which was as low as D- in 2010. As the company appeared to be winding down, after 2013, no new complaints were reported.

“Complaints over three years old automatically rolled off of the Business Review, according to BBB policy. As a result, over time, Trump University’s BBB rating went to an A in July 2014 and then to an A+ in January 2015.”

Related: Trump’s Net Worth Isn’t His Only Claim That’s Fake

In other words, Trump was lying about Trump University’s rating on national television, and even provided misleading documentary evidence in real time to help him make his case.

In a sane campaign season, this sort of thing would be utterly disqualifying, but whether it will have much effect on Trump’s core support is doubtful. The billionaire’s supporters have proven remarkably immune to factual arguments about Trump’s obvious deficiencies as a candidate, and uninterested in proof that he frequently lies to them .



Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs –

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Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs

Twelve private training institutions have signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with the Small Business Bureau (SBB) to train entrepreneurs.

GINA said this is being facilitated through the Micro and Small Enterprise Development programme (MSED).

The MoU will allow these institutions to train young entrepreneurs, who have benefitted from cash grants and loans through the SBB, in managing their own small businesses, GINA added.

Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin and his Permanent Secretary, Rajdai Jagernauth (GINA photo)

The institutions which will facilitate the training are the Ruimveldt Life Improvement Centre, Generation Next, Roadside Baptist Church Skills Training Centre, Partners of the Americas, Kuru Kuru Co-operative College, Action Coach Guyana, Guyana School of Agriculture, EMPRETEC, Cerulean Inc, the Critchlow Labour College, Management Options and Interweave Solutions.

Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin encouraged the trainers to utilise modern technologies which would make the training relevant to the contemporary business environment.

GINA said that the MSED programme which began in 2013 has trained more than 1,000 young entrepreneurs who accessed small loans and grants through the SBB.

Officer in Charge of the bureau, Gillian Edwards-Griffith said, “We have done to date 193 grants, $300,000 each, and in terms of loans with financial partners, we have three, of which two are active giving a total of 63 loans”.

The MSED programme will be evaluated by an independent body to give the SBB a fair idea of the successes prior to the second phase of the training.

Funding will be evenly disbursed among the training institutions, GINA added.

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  • 10 Tips For Selling Your Gold for Cash – ABC News #gold,

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    10 Tips For Selling Your Gold for Cash

    In today’s swerving economy, stocks are out, and gold is in.

    The price of gold is up 20 percent since the beginning of 2011, and by mid-August gold was going for over $1,700 per ounce. At times on Monday, its spot price hovered near $1,900 per ounce.

    So how do you cash in?

    If you’re like thousands of Americans, you go to a gold party, the hottest trend on the block, where you can have your jewelry appraised and get paid cash on the spot.

    But not so fast.

    With every good deal comes a case of buyer’s and, in this case, seller’s beware, a reminder that consumers should do their homework before selling their jewelry at gold parties or in a local jewelry store.

    The Better Business Bureau (BBB) advises consumers that while gold parties may be a fun and convenient way to make some cash, they may not provide you the best deal.

    Follow these tips from BBB to make sure you’re getting the best value for your gold.

    1: Understand the Scales

    The weight of gold helps determine its value, but keep in mind that jewelers use a different measurement standard called a Troy ounce. U.S. scales will measure 28 grams per ounce, while gold is measured at 31.1 grams per Troy ounce. Some dealers may also use a system of weights called pennyweight (dwt) to measure a Troy ounce, while others will use grams. A pennyweight is the equivalent of 1.555 grams. Be alert that a dealer does not weigh your gold by pennyweight but pay you by the gram, a sneaky way for the dealer to pay you less for more weight of gold.

    2: Know Your Karats text: Pure gold is too soft to be practically used so it is combined with other metals to create durability and color. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) requires that all jewelry sold in the U.S. describe a karat fineness of the alloy. One karat equals 1/24 of pure gold by weight. So 14 karats would mean the jewelry was 14 parts gold and 10 parts other metals. It is illegal for jewelry to be labeled “gold jewelry” if it is less than 10 karats. It is important to know the karats of your gold to make an informed decision on the scrap value of your jewelry.

    3: Keep Your Karats Separate

    Don’t let jewelry of different karat value be weighed together. Some dealers will weigh all jewelry together and pay you for the lowest karat value. Separate your jewelry by karat value before attending a gold party.

    Call a local jewelry store or check with an online source, such as www.goldprice.org. to verify the current market price for gold before you sell. Some dealers know people are just looking for quick cash to put in their pockets and will offer you money for your gold that is lower than the actual value.

    Check out jewelry stores and gold buyers registered with BBB at www.bbb.org. A BBB Business Review tells basic information about the business as well as any complaints and whether the complaints have been resolved when presented to the business by BBB.

    6: Know What You Are Selling

    Some gold items may be worth more when sold as they are, rather than if they are melted down. If your gold necklace or bracelet comes from a well-known designer or maker, it may have a value to some buyers beyond the gold it’s made of.

    7: Know the Fine Print

    If you choose to use a mail-away service, make sure you understand the terms and conditions. Send the items insured. Find out how long before you get reimbursed, how long they will keep your gold before melting it down, and how many days you have to turn down the offer. Take photos of your items before sending and make sure you hold on to all relevant paperwork and filings.

    Remember, you don’t have to jump at the first offer for your gold. Shop around for a few different bids. To ensure you are really getting the best price for your jewelry, have it appraised before selling. This may cost you more up front, but your jewelry may be worth more than its weight when you include workmanship, artistic value, and embedded gems for the piece as a whole.

    Keep in mind that gold parties, often hosted by friends and neighbors, are really more about fun than value. Taking all factors into consideration, sellers at gold parties will likely get between 70 and 80 percent of the real value of their item.

    Gold buyers are required by law to ask sellers for government-issued identification, This requirement is designed to protect consumers by helping police investigate the sale of stolen property and prevent money laundering. All reputable gold buyers comply with these rules, so ifyou don’t get asked to show your I.D. be warned.



    How to File a Complaint With the Better Business Bureau Online #better

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    How to File a Complaint With the Better Business Bureau Online

    The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a group of private BBB organizations in the US and Canada that aim to facilitate a fair marketplace for both businesses and consumers. The organization gathers information regarding reliability, fraud, and ethical business practices and informs the public of scams and other business-related issues. The BBB also provides consumers with the ability to file complaints that can help the organization act as a mediator between the consumer and the business in question. If you have a problem with a business, you should first try to resolve it directly and then use the BBB website to file an online complaint.

    Steps Edit

    Part One of Four:
    Framing the Details of Your Complaint Edit

    Contact the company directly. If you have a problem with a vendor, your first course of action should be to contact the vendor directly. You may be able to resolve the problem quickly in this way. For example, if you purchased an item that you do not believe matches what was advertised, you could take it back to the store and ask for a refund. [1] [2]

    Make a formal request in writing. If your first attempt at resolving the problem does not lead to a successful result, you should document your problem in writing. This will serve two purposes. It will give the vendor another opportunity to satisfy your concerns before the problem becomes bigger. It will also give you some documentation of the problem, which you will be able to use when you file your online complaint with the BBB. [3]

    • In your written letter, you should clearly identify the problem and the resolution that you would like. For example, you might say, “I am writing because the Acme Widgets that I bought do not glow in the dark, as the advertising claims. I would like to return them for a full refund.”
    • Summarize your prior efforts to resolve the problem. You should provide the dates and locations of any contacts you made with anyone from the company. For example, you might say, “On October 1, 2016, I returned to the Acme store in Anytown, USA, and I spoke with the manager, Mr. Smith. I asked to return the widgets, but he told me he would not refund my money.”

    Keep a copy of any letter that you send. In most cases, if your first effort to resolve the problem was not successful, you are not going to change the result just by putting your concerns in writing. The purpose of the letter is to provide documentation for your BBB complaint. Make sure that you keep a copy of the letter. If possible, you should print and sign the letter, and then save a scanned copy of the letter so you can upload it into your online BBB complaint. [4]

    Understand the limitations of filing a BBB complaint. The BBB will accept certain types of complaints and will attempt to help you resolve the dispute with the company. However, there are several types of disputes that the BBB will not accept. These disallowed issues include: [5]

    • Employee/employer disputes
    • Discrimination claims
    • Matters that are/have been litigated/arbitrated
    • Complaints against individuals not engaged in business
    • Issues challenging the validity of local, state, or federal law
    • Complaints against government agencies, including the postal service
    • Matters not related to marketplace issues

    Notify your local chamber of commerce. Most local communities have a chamber of commerce. This is an organization of the businesses in the community, which provides a variety of services for both the businesses as well as consumers in the area. You may wish to contact your local chamber of commerce to find out if they have a formal complaint process.

    Contact the attorney general for your state. In most states, the attorney general’s office may contain a consumer affairs bureau or department. You should check your state’s official website to find contact information for this office, and then contact them with the details of your complaint. The attorney general does not always get involved with individual complaints, but if your concern indicates a larger consumer problem, the attorney general may take legal action. [15]

    • For example, in Indiana, the attorney general website contains a link for you to file an online complaint directly to their office. [16]
    • The Massachusetts attorney general has a Consumer Advocacy and Response Division that accepts and responds to consumer complaints. [17]

    Post your concerns online or on social media. Although you may not resolve your problem this way, you can warn other consumers and perhaps exert some pressure on the company. Post your concerns on Facebook or Twitter. You may also use a source like Yelp.com to post your complaint. [18]

    Take legal action in court. If the amount of money involved is substantial, and you still have not received satisfactory treatment, you may wish to take legal action in court. For this, you should consult with a local attorney. An attorney can help you review the details of your case and determine if you have a valid claim that can be satisfied in court. An attorney can also help guide you through the legal process with drafting and filing a complaint, and taking the case to settlement or trial. [19]

    • If the amount is within a particular dollar amount, you may be able to file a complaint in small claims court. This is a division of your local trial court that has simplified procedures and generally easier paperwork. For information, you should contact the trial court in your county.


    Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Our Ratings #business #insurance #companies


    #better business bureau

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    Better Business Bureau: Trump Lied About Our Ratings

    The Council of Better Business Bureaus is calling out Donald Trump for what appears to have been a brazen effort to mislead the Fox News hosts who moderated last week’s Republican presidential debate, as well as the millions of Americans who tuned in to watch last Thursday night.

    During the debate, the moderators and Trump’s opponent, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, brought up the subject of Trump University, a now-defunct business that Trump established to sell supposedly educational courses and seminars on entrepreneurship. Trump University is currently being sued for fraud by numerous former students, who said that they were pressured to take on debt to pay for tens of thousands of dollars in fees and that the company did not deliver the type of educational experience it promised.

    Related: Trump Numbers Are Falling – How Far Can They Go?

    On stage last week, Trump angrily challenged criticism of Trump University, insisting that the organization had a “98 percent” approval rating among its students.

    But it was when Rubio brought up the company’s D- grade from the Better Business Bureau that Trump really started to get creative.

    He conceded that at one point the company did have a D- rating from the Better Business Bureau, but he said the rating was poor only because Trump University hadn’t bothered to submit data to the BBB. He insisted that the grade was subsequently “elevated to an A” once the data was supplied.

    “The only reason that is was a D was because we didn’t care — we didn’t give them the information. ” Trump said. “When they got the information it became an A.”

    Related: Here’s Why Donald Trump’s Lies May Be Good for U.S. Politics

    During a commercial break, Trump was given a fax from his staff, which he handed to Fox moderator Bret Baier. He later posted the document on Facebook. It appeared to be a BBB Business Review giving Trump University (actually, Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, after a 2011 name change) an A grade.

    At least one news organization reported, at the time, that the document appeared to have been faxed to the Fox News set by the BBB itself.

    On Tuesday, the Council of Better Business Bureaus issued a detailed statement setting the record straight.

    “BBB did not send a document of any kind to the Republican debate site last Thursday evening,” it read. “The document presented to debate moderators did not come from BBB that night.”

    It continued, “Trump University does not currently have an A rating with BBB. The BBB Business Review for this company has continually been “No Rating” since September 2015. Prior to that, it fluctuated between D- and A+. The document posted on social media on Thursday night was not a current BBB Business Review of Trump University. It appeared to be part of a Business Review from 2014.”

    Related: Irony Alert: Trump Is Upset that Ted Cruz Is Lying

    More damning, though, was the BBB’s account of how Trump University’s rating went from a D- to an A. The BBB said that, despite Trump’s claims to the contrary, the rating was never increased as a result of new information received from the company.

    What happened is that as Trump University failed as a business, it stopped attracting new students, and with no new students, there were no more complaints filed to the BBB.

    “During the period when Trump University appeared to be active in the marketplace, BBB received multiple customer complaints about this business,” the statement said. “These complaints affected the Trump University BBB rating, which was as low as D- in 2010. As the company appeared to be winding down, after 2013, no new complaints were reported.

    “Complaints over three years old automatically rolled off of the Business Review, according to BBB policy. As a result, over time, Trump University’s BBB rating went to an A in July 2014 and then to an A+ in January 2015.”

    Related: Trump’s Net Worth Isn’t His Only Claim That’s Fake

    In other words, Trump was lying about Trump University’s rating on national television, and even provided misleading documentary evidence in real time to help him make his case.

    In a sane campaign season, this sort of thing would be utterly disqualifying, but whether it will have much effect on Trump’s core support is doubtful. The billionaire’s supporters have proven remarkably immune to factual arguments about Trump’s obvious deficiencies as a candidate, and uninterested in proof that he frequently lies to them .



    Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau #free #business #banking


    #small business bureau

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    Concordia University

    Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau

    Our vision is to provide high quality, professional business consulting services to organizations in the Greater Montreal area at competitive rates. The Concordia Small Business Consulting Bureau (CSBCB) has the services and skilled staff to meet the diverse needs of today’s entrepreneurs and local business community. Collectively, the Bureau’s consultants bring over 35 years of real-world experience from various industries including consumer and specialty goods, travel and lodging, telecom, banking and technology, healthcare, energy, real estate, and logistics.

    The Bureau adopts a multi-disciplinary and cross-functional approach to solving individualized client needs, bringing together our collective expertise in finance, marketing, strategy, management, operations and information technology into our decision making process to provide thorough analysis and comprehensive recommendations. We utilize the invaluable expert council from the highly respected and internationally acclaimed faculty members of the John Molson School of Business. We have access to market research databases, business related research studies and statistics covering almost every industry.

    Whether you are looking to launch your business and require a business plan, or already have an established business and are looking for market analysis for an expansion plan, or simply need advice for your business, the Bureau can help you in achieving your vision.

    The CSBCB is managed by a select group of five MBA students from the John Molson School of Business. The Bureau operates under the mentorship of Alexandra Dawson. Associate Professor in the Department of Management.



    Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs –

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    Small Business Bureau signs MoU with 12 groups to train entrepreneurs

    Twelve private training institutions have signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with the Small Business Bureau (SBB) to train entrepreneurs.

    GINA said this is being facilitated through the Micro and Small Enterprise Development programme (MSED).

    The MoU will allow these institutions to train young entrepreneurs, who have benefitted from cash grants and loans through the SBB, in managing their own small businesses, GINA added.

    Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin and his Permanent Secretary, Rajdai Jagernauth (GINA photo)

    The institutions which will facilitate the training are the Ruimveldt Life Improvement Centre, Generation Next, Roadside Baptist Church Skills Training Centre, Partners of the Americas, Kuru Kuru Co-operative College, Action Coach Guyana, Guyana School of Agriculture, EMPRETEC, Cerulean Inc, the Critchlow Labour College, Management Options and Interweave Solutions.

    Minister of Business and Tourism, Dominic Gaskin encouraged the trainers to utilise modern technologies which would make the training relevant to the contemporary business environment.

    GINA said that the MSED programme which began in 2013 has trained more than 1,000 young entrepreneurs who accessed small loans and grants through the SBB.

    Officer in Charge of the bureau, Gillian Edwards-Griffith said, “We have done to date 193 grants, $300,000 each, and in terms of loans with financial partners, we have three, of which two are active giving a total of 63 loans”.

    The MSED programme will be evaluated by an independent body to give the SBB a fair idea of the successes prior to the second phase of the training.

    Funding will be evenly disbursed among the training institutions, GINA added.

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