Tag : Cash

Cash Flow Story, cash flow business.#Cash #flow #business


cash flow business

Cash flow business Cash flow business

Cash flow business Cash flow business

  • Cash flow business

Cash flow business

  • Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

  • Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

    Cash Flow Story What are your numbers telling you?

    Your Cash Flow Story Scorecard produces an automated financial health check on your business, ensuring everyone looks at your numbers in the same way…. whether you are a business owner/manager an advisor or banker.

    Using powerful processes such as the Power of One, the 4 Chapters and the Big 3 Cash Flow measures the Scorecard will enable you to understand your financial story and improve the performance of your business.

    Taking less than 10 minutes to setup, this unique web based Scorecard will deliver powerful analysis of your numbers in an easy to understand format. The Scorecard will bring your numbers to life and enable you to measure the financial impact of your decisions in advance.

    Cash flow business

    CFS Business

    With our business version you can:

    • See your financial story unfold
    • Gain valuable insight into your cash flow
    • Understand what your business is worth
    • Access your story from anywhere

    Learn more about CFS Business

    Cash flow business

    CFS Advisor

    With our advisor version you can:

    • Guide your clients through their financial story
    • Drive improvements to your client’s performance
    • Go from setup to meaningful analysis in under 10 minutes
    • Discuss the story over a coffee on your tablet/iPad
    • Become a financial story teller

    Learn more about CFS Advisor

    At a glance

    Pay attention to the right areas. Hone in on your critical results

    Easy to use

    Web-based, tablet and ipad ready. Understand your business anywhere!

    Fast Results

    Less than 10 minutes to get started and learn about your business

    Intuitive help

    Read the story to fully understand your story.



  • Home Party Plan Training, Cash Flow Show, cash flow business.#Cash #flow #business


    Home Party Plan Training

    Whether you are a party plan consultant, team leader or corporate executive the Cash Flow Show has the home party plan sales training and direct sales resources that you are looking for!Cash flow business

    You have come to the right place!

    • Direct Sales Training To Create Consistent Cash Flow In Your Home Party Plan Business
    • Team Support And Super Starter Training Tools To Maximize Leaders Time
    • Corporate Leadership Coaching And Mentoring Start Up Consulting Remotely Or At Your Location

    Deb Bixler, creator of the Cash Flow Show, is the leading authority on home party plan training systems to grow a direct selling business.

    Instantly Download Audio

    Pump UP Your Calendar!

    • Discover New Strategies
    • Increase Bookings Guaranteed

    Cash flow business

    Coaching Mentoring

    We provide affordable team training, coaching and mentoring, corporate consulting as well as start up guidance and 1:1 private sessions.

    Cash flow business

    Cash Flow Show Radio

    Broadcasting 7 days a week, the Cash Flow Show – Home Business Radio was named the top 25 ‘Must Have Item’ for direct sellers 2 years in a row.

    Cash flow business

    Home Party Training

    With products for every personality and home party plan training need, the Cash Flow Show store features both hard copy CDs and virtual products.

    Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

    Cash flow business

    Home Party Plan Training

    Honored by OnAir Direct Selling LIVE and NBC TV News as one of the top 5 direct sales resources on the internet you will find a solution to any direct selling problem here.

    The action based home party sales tips you find here will work in any company, any product line and any business model. Sales is sales, home party or not. If you are in sales, then you are in the right place!

    If you do not find the exact home party plan training solution that you are looking for please call or send us an email!



    Capital One Spark Cash Review #business #courses


    #business credit cards

    #

    Credit Cards

    Banking

    Investing

    Mortgages

    Loans

    Insurance

    Credit Cards

    Banking

    Investing

    Mortgages

    Loans

    Insurance

    Nerdwallet Review

    If your business needs a straightforward cash rewards credit card, the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is a solid option. It offers 2% back on all of your purchases and there’s no annual spending cap. There’s also a signup bonus: Earn a one-time $500 cash bonus once you spend $4,500 on purchases within the first 3 months.

    The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business has an annual fee of $0 intro for first year; $59 after that, and no foreign transaction fees. There are business cards without annual fees, but this isn’t a bad fee — you can make it up by spending just $2,950 a year. The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is ideal for businesses that don’t require frequent travel, and for spending that is high and/or varies throughout the year.

    Want to learn more about the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business? See our full review of all the Spark cards for additional information.

    NerdWallet reviews are the result of independent research by our editorial team while cardholder reviews are contributions from independent users not affiliated with NerdWallet. Banks, issuers and credit card companies are not responsible for any content posted on the NerdWallet site, nor do they endorse or guarantee any posted comments or reviews.

    Write a review

    Some of the reviews on the NerdWallet site were purchased through a third party provider. Users who post a review directly on the NerdWallet site will not be compensated in any way. Please see our Terms of Use and Posting Guidelines for more information.

    2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.

    Additionally, this site may be compensated through third party advertisers. However, the results of our comparison tools, blog content and editorial reviews are based on objective analysis. For more information, please see our Advertiser Disclosure .



    What type of accounts should I use for ATM businesses cash flow?

    #atm business

    #

    Back to search results

    What type of accounts should I use for ATM businesses cash flow ?

    I use the cash accrual accounting style for my ATM business. I cycle cash through my ATM’s that I have entered into my QB as owners equity originally. I am wanting to balance the checking account. When that money cycles back through to my bank account and gets electronically deposited what is it considered? Is it an “other assett” or what? Then when I withdrawl to load machines again what type of account should I use for the withdrawls, a “short term liability” account? I really need some clearity.

    You might say the cash is my reaccuring supplies.

    Why do you want to report this?

    I think I am tracking with Mistyblue. I have the income account for the surcharge fees that users of the machine owe me. The expense account for any fees for the particular bank where my money is cycled through. But what about the ST liability account. are you saying use this account type for the electronic deposits from user’s of my machine’s back to my account and use it for my withdrawls to load back into my machine. I thought I would need a “plus” and a “minus” sort of set up with the accounts?

    Recommended Answer

    2 people found this helpful

    This is how I have done this: I’ve set up a bank account for the ATM in qb as well a income account and I used a short term liability account. Of course a bank service charge account for the ATM.

    The short term liability account is the cycle account (withdraw and well as put back) – The income part I separate to its own income account. This way tracking income, expense, and your main cycle account. Which bottom line each rec balances. Note: I would check as well with your accountant on according to your area on sales tax requirements.

    Was this answer helpful? Yes No

    I think I am tracking with Mistyblue. I have the income account for the surcharge fees that users of the machine owe me. The expense account for any fees for the particular bank where my money is cycled through. But what about the ST liability account. are you saying use this account type for the electronic deposits from user’s of my machine’s back to my account and use it for my withdrawls to load back into my machine. I thought I would need a “plus” and a “minus” sort of set up with the accounts?

    1 additional answer

    No answers have been posted

    This post has been closed and is not open for comments or answers.

    More Actions

    People come to QuickBooks Learn Support for help and answers we want to let them know that we’re here to listen and share our knowledge. We do that with the style and format of our responses. Here are five guidelines:

    1. Keep it conversational. When answering questions, write like you speak. Imagine you’re explaining something to a trusted friend, using simple, everyday language. Avoid jargon and technical terms when possible. When no other word will do, explain technical terms in plain English.
    2. Be clear and state the answer right up front. Ask yourself what specific information the person really needs and then provide it. Stick to the topic and avoid unnecessary details. Break information down into a numbered or bulleted list and highlight the most important details in bold.
    3. Be concise. Aim for no more than two short sentences in a paragraph, and try to keep paragraphs to two lines. A wall of text can look intimidating and many won’t read it, so break it up. It’s okay to link to other resources for more details, but avoid giving answers that contain little more than a link.
    4. Be a good listener. When people post very general questions, take a second to try to understand what they’re really looking for. Then, provide a response that guides them to the best possible outcome.
    5. Be encouraging and positive. Look for ways to eliminate uncertainty by anticipating people’s concerns. Make it apparent that we really like helping them achieve positive outcomes.
    Do you still have a question?

    Ask your question to the community. Most questions get a response in about a day.

    Back to search results



    Business Valuation – Discounted Cash Flow #premium #business #cards


    #business valuation

    #

    Financial Calculators from Dinkytown.net

    Business Valuation – Discounted Cash Flow

    Business valuation is typically based on three major methods: the income approach, the asset approach and the market (comparable sales) approach. Among the income approaches is the discounted cash flow methodology calculating the net present value (‘NPV’) of future cash flows for an enterprise. As an alternative to the more abbreviated income capitalization approach, this methodology is more relevant where future operating conditions and cash flows are variable or not projected to be materially consistent with current performance levels.

    Javascript is required for this calculator. If you are using Internet Explorer, you may need to select to ‘Allow Blocked Content’ to view this calculator.

    For more information about these these financial calculators please visit: Dinkytown Financial Calculators from KJE Computer Solutions, LLC

    The estimated Net Present Value (NPV) of your business is NPV_VALUE.

    Your cash flow was estimated in two parts. First from your cash flow statement, and secondly from projecting future cash flows assuming a growth of EXPECTED_ANNUAL_GROWTH. We first calculated your estimated cash flow for year one from your inputs. An additional PROJECT_ADDITIONAL_YEARS years of cash flows were calculated assuming a EXPECTED_ANNUAL_GROWTH annual growth (for a total of PROJECT_YEARS). Each year’s estimated cash flow was then discounted by WEIGHTED_AVERAGE_COST_OF_CAPITAL (your weighted average cost of capital) for the number of years until the cash flow would be realized. The sum of all of your future discounted cash flows is the net present value of your business. **GRAPH**

    What else can I do to increase my valuation?

    • Increase your operating profits:
      You can directly impact your valuation by becoming more profitable. Increased efficiency and lower operating expenses can have a dramatic impact on your business’ valuation. Even relatively small increases in profitability can have a dramatic impact on your valuation.
  • Reduce inventory and accounts receivable:
    By reducing your inventory and accounts receivable, you can decrease the amount of capital that is tied up in your business. The net change directly affects your valuation.

  • Reduce your taxes:
    Very much like reducing your inventory, reducing your tax burden can directly impact the value of your business. A business that creates effective tax shields can be worth substantially more than one that doesn’t consider this important variable.

  • Effective capital expenditures:
    Target your capital expenditures to projects that increase your growth rate, or increase your profitability. While capital expenditures reduce your near-term cash flow, effective investment in your business can have a positive impact in your valuation.
  • Your cash flow statement:

    Business Valuation – Discounted Cash Flow Definitions

    NPV Value of your business This is the value of all of your future cash flows discounted in today’s dollars at your Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC).

    Expected annual growth This is the rate you expect your business to grow. This rate is only used on years 2 and above to estimate your future cash flow.

    Weighted average cost of capital (WACC) This is the cost of capital, or the interest rate, your investors require to put money into your business. Unless you are a Fortune 500 company with excellent business credit scores, this rate should be at least 12% to 25%. For small businesses that rate can be much higher.

    Years of cash flow to include This is the number of years that the projection will include in the value of your business. For example, if you include 100 years (the maximum) we calculate the present value of all future cash flows generated for the next 100 years into your business’ value. Entering a high number would assume that the business would continue with the current projections for that entire length of time. You may wish to reduce this projected period if you have a known end date for the business cash flows, or to make a more conservative estimate of the value.

    Operating profit This is your total profit before interest and taxes. This is often called Earnings Before Interest and Taxes or EBIT.

    Interest expense Total interest expense for the year.

    Interest income Total interest income for the year.

    Income taxes Total income taxes paid for the year.

    Depreciation and amortization If you had any depreciation on equipment or buildings enter those amounts here. They are added back into your cash flow.

    Change in accounts payable If you had a net change in your accounts payable, enter the change here. If you had an increase in accounts payable, your cash flow goes up. If you had a decrease in your accounts payable, your cash flow is reduced.

    Change in inventory If you had a net change in your inventory, enter that amount here. If you are holding more inventory your cash flow is decreased.

    Change in accounts receivable If you had a net change in your accounts receivable, enter that amount here. Reducing your accounts receivable by collecting money owed more quickly can increase your cash flow and your valuation.

    Other net change Enter any other net change in other assets or liabilities that impacted your cash flow for the period.

    Capital expenditures This is the amount you spent on capital equipment and buildings that you were not able to expense for the period. If you were able to expense the expenditure, it is already accounted for in your EBIT.

    Additional investment income Enter any other investment that increased or (decreased) your cash flow for the period.

    The Best Financial Calculators Anywhere!

    Put them on your website!

    1998-2016 KJE Computer Solutions, LLC
    Financial Calculators at http://www.dinkytown.net
    (612) 331-2291
    1730 New Brighton Blvd. PMB #111
    Minneapolis, MN 55413

    KJE Computer Solutions, LLC’s information and interactive calculators are made available to you as self-help tools for your independent use and are not intended to provide investment advice. We cannot and do not guarantee their applicability or accuracy in regards to your individual circumstances. All examples are hypothetical and are for illustrative purposes. We encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding all personal finance issues. More Information



    Merchant Cash Advance for Small Business #business #link


    #business cash advance

    #

    Get the Funding You Need to Grow Your Business

    You know that sales are coming and the revenue you need is right around the corner but, in order to grow your business, you need funding now. We get it, and we can help. With us, you can get a merchant cash advance for small business growth that leverages future credit card sales for the working capital you need today. BFS Capital’s merchant cash advances are a reliable, flexible funding solution you can use for any business expense.

    BFS Capital Merchant Cash Advances
    We offer business cash advances with payback flexibility that aligns with your sales.

    We review your recent credit card sales statements.

  • We base our approvals on recent card sales history and predictability of future sales.

  • We take payment on an automated fixed percentage until paid in full.

    Merchant Cash Advances for the Modern Business Owner

    Our merchant cash advances were designed with flexible payback options so you can focus on the day-to-day needs of your business. not worry about your next payment. Get business cash advances so that you can solve problems fast and adapt with agility to the needs of your industry. Apply online for funding today and find out how much you qualify for.

    Get a Business Loan



  • Accepting Cash Only #business #finance #loan


    #business finances

    #

    Cash is the most commonly accepted and reliable form of payment for a business. Many small businesses operate as “cash only” merchants. Years ago this wouldn’t have been uncommon, but with advances in technology, business owners must ask themselves if they’re hurting their bottom line by limiting payment options.

    If you’re thinking about starting a cash only business or if you’re considering expanding your current payment options, be aware of the pros and cons of only accepting cash.

    Pros of accepting only cash:

    Cash payments ensure that businesses receive funds immediately. With each transaction, your business immediately receives the appropriate payment amount without the worry of waiting periods or not getting paid at all.

    Cash is the simplest form of payment and therefore involves less bookkeeping. For a business, that not only means less stress and hassle, but it also may save money in the time and labor it would take for a bookkeeper to record other payments methods.

    There is limited risk of fraud when accepting cash only. There are cases of counterfeit cash payments, but compared to other payment methods, fraud is much less common in cash transactions.

    Cash only businesses don’t have to worry about third parties or fees associated with other payment options.

    Cons of accepting only cash:

    Customers who do not have enough cash on them will have to walk away from a purchase they would otherwise make.

    Your business may lose customers by only accepting cash. As card payments become more and more popular, many consumers expect this to be an option when making purchases. If they find that a particular business only accepts cash, they may feel inconvenienced and shop elsewhere.

    Keeping large sums of cash on your business’s premises increases the amount of time you’ll spend managing finances and also creates an added security risk.

    The IRS requires that you file a Form 8300 if your business receives more than $10,000 in cash from one buyer as a result of a single transaction or two or more related transactions. The same rule applies to cash equivalents such as traveler’s checks, bank drafts, cashier’s checks, and money orders. The form requires the name, address, and Social Security number of the buyer.

    The nature of some small businesses may make it smarter to stay cash only. Flea markets, street vendors, and lawn service providers are just a few examples of common cash only small businesses. At the end of the day, you will have to decide which payment options will create the most success for your business.



    What type of accounts should I use for ATM businesses cash flow?

    #atm business

    #

    Back to search results

    What type of accounts should I use for ATM businesses cash flow ?

    I use the cash accrual accounting style for my ATM business. I cycle cash through my ATM’s that I have entered into my QB as owners equity originally. I am wanting to balance the checking account. When that money cycles back through to my bank account and gets electronically deposited what is it considered? Is it an “other assett” or what? Then when I withdrawl to load machines again what type of account should I use for the withdrawls, a “short term liability” account? I really need some clearity.

    You might say the cash is my reaccuring supplies.

    Why do you want to report this?

    I think I am tracking with Mistyblue. I have the income account for the surcharge fees that users of the machine owe me. The expense account for any fees for the particular bank where my money is cycled through. But what about the ST liability account. are you saying use this account type for the electronic deposits from user’s of my machine’s back to my account and use it for my withdrawls to load back into my machine. I thought I would need a “plus” and a “minus” sort of set up with the accounts?

    Recommended Answer

    2 people found this helpful

    This is how I have done this: I’ve set up a bank account for the ATM in qb as well a income account and I used a short term liability account. Of course a bank service charge account for the ATM.

    The short term liability account is the cycle account (withdraw and well as put back) – The income part I separate to its own income account. This way tracking income, expense, and your main cycle account. Which bottom line each rec balances. Note: I would check as well with your accountant on according to your area on sales tax requirements.

    Was this answer helpful? Yes No

    I think I am tracking with Mistyblue. I have the income account for the surcharge fees that users of the machine owe me. The expense account for any fees for the particular bank where my money is cycled through. But what about the ST liability account. are you saying use this account type for the electronic deposits from user’s of my machine’s back to my account and use it for my withdrawls to load back into my machine. I thought I would need a “plus” and a “minus” sort of set up with the accounts?

    1 additional answer

    No answers have been posted

    This post has been closed and is not open for comments or answers.

    More Actions

    People come to QuickBooks Learn Support for help and answers we want to let them know that we’re here to listen and share our knowledge. We do that with the style and format of our responses. Here are five guidelines:

    1. Keep it conversational. When answering questions, write like you speak. Imagine you’re explaining something to a trusted friend, using simple, everyday language. Avoid jargon and technical terms when possible. When no other word will do, explain technical terms in plain English.
    2. Be clear and state the answer right up front. Ask yourself what specific information the person really needs and then provide it. Stick to the topic and avoid unnecessary details. Break information down into a numbered or bulleted list and highlight the most important details in bold.
    3. Be concise. Aim for no more than two short sentences in a paragraph, and try to keep paragraphs to two lines. A wall of text can look intimidating and many won’t read it, so break it up. It’s okay to link to other resources for more details, but avoid giving answers that contain little more than a link.
    4. Be a good listener. When people post very general questions, take a second to try to understand what they’re really looking for. Then, provide a response that guides them to the best possible outcome.
    5. Be encouraging and positive. Look for ways to eliminate uncertainty by anticipating people’s concerns. Make it apparent that we really like helping them achieve positive outcomes.
    Do you still have a question?

    Ask your question to the community. Most questions get a response in about a day.

    Back to search results



    Capital One Spark Cash Review #small #companies


    #business credit cards

    #

    Credit Cards

    Banking

    Investing

    Mortgages

    Loans

    Insurance

    Credit Cards

    Banking

    Investing

    Mortgages

    Loans

    Insurance

    Nerdwallet Review

    If your business needs a straightforward cash rewards credit card, the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is a solid option. It offers 2% back on all of your purchases and there’s no annual spending cap. There’s also a signup bonus: Earn a one-time $500 cash bonus once you spend $4,500 on purchases within the first 3 months.

    The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business has an annual fee of $0 intro for first year; $59 after that, and no foreign transaction fees. There are business cards without annual fees, but this isn’t a bad fee — you can make it up by spending just $2,950 a year. The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is ideal for businesses that don’t require frequent travel, and for spending that is high and/or varies throughout the year.

    Want to learn more about the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business? See our full review of all the Spark cards for additional information.

    NerdWallet reviews are the result of independent research by our editorial team while cardholder reviews are contributions from independent users not affiliated with NerdWallet. Banks, issuers and credit card companies are not responsible for any content posted on the NerdWallet site, nor do they endorse or guarantee any posted comments or reviews.

    Write a review

    Some of the reviews on the NerdWallet site were purchased through a third party provider. Users who post a review directly on the NerdWallet site will not be compensated in any way. Please see our Terms of Use and Posting Guidelines for more information.

    2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

    Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.

    Additionally, this site may be compensated through third party advertisers. However, the results of our comparison tools, blog content and editorial reviews are based on objective analysis. For more information, please see our Advertiser Disclosure .



    Online Merchant Cash Advance #business #plan #templates


    #business cash advance

    #

    Merchant Cash Advances

    What is a merchant cash advance?

    When you receive a merchant cash advance, your business gains upfront working capital in exchange for a percentage of future credit card sales. Merchant cash advance companies frequently partner with card processing companies to hold back a percentage of sales revenue. A merchant cash advance is also sometimes referred to as a business cash advance.

    How are merchant cash advances different from a business loan?

    Merchant cash advances are not small business loans. You are selling future income in exchange for immediate access to working capital. Instead of collecting payments to cover the advance, the merchant will automatically deduct a set percentage of your credit card sales until they recover the advance. In contrast, other small business loans can be paid back using funds from other accounts, rather than being automatically withdrawn from your sales.

    Because merchant cash advances are not loans, these agreements are not held to the same laws that regulate lenders, so interest rates can be upwards of 38%.

    Is a merchant cash advance a good fit for my business?

    Merchant cash advances offer benefits to small businesses, including payment schedule – you only pay back your advance when your business makes sales. If you have had strong sales but struggle with little or bad credit, a merchant cash advance may be a good option for your business.

    Your business typically will not qualify for a merchant service cash advance if you have a prior bankruptcy on file, if your business has been in existence for less than one year or if you do not already have the ability to process credit card payments for your customers. This segment of the lending industry is not regulated, so it’s important to understand the costs up front.

    While some small businesses may have turned to merchant cash advances in the past because they had few options to get the working capital they need, platform lenders like Kabbage are now a great option for small businesses.

    Unlike merchant cash advances, an online loan from Kabbage provides ongoing access to funding. Take what you need, when you need, and only pay fees on the amount you use.

    The biggest difference between Kabbage and merchant cash advance companies is the amount business owners pay and how rates are determined. Merchant cash advance companies typically base interest rate charges on the borrower’s credit rating – often with an APR equivalent of more than 38%.

    Kabbage, however, looks at a variety of real-time business data – not just a credit score – to determine the financial health of each business. Based on this review, monthly loans fees between 1.5 and 12% are assessed. Kabbage customers can pay off loans early with no penalties and aren’t charged any fees on the remaining months.

    Get the security of a business line of credit today

    Qualify for a line up to $100,000 in minutes

    Loans to suit your business

    Refer a Business, Get $200

    Help your friends grow their small businesses and earn a gift card! Find out more

    Kabbage is powered by the Kabbage Platform. Visit the website

    *Kabbage can approve you in minutes when we are able to automatically obtain your business data and instantly verify your bank account. In some situations errors may occur during the sign up process, or we may need to send micro-deposits to confirm your bank account for security purposes. If this is the case, it may take up to several days to provide you access to funding.

    2016 Kabbage Inc. All rights reserved. Kabbage is a registered trademark of Kabbage, Inc.
    All Kabbage business loans are issued by Celtic Bank, a Utah-Chartered Industrial Bank, Member FDIC.
    Celtic Bank Privacy Policy

    Are you from the UK?

    We have detected that you are accessing the site from the UK, if you want to keep browsing the US site click the close button. You can always browse to the UK site by clicking the site selector at the top of the screen or click the button below.