Tag : Dog

How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps: Starting a

#dog walking business

#

How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps

With recent figures showing that Brits spent more than £4bn on their beloved pets in 2015, you’d be barking mad to think the recession has impacted on the UK’s pet spend.

Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

Marking a 10% increase on pooch spending from 2010, it’s not only large retailers benefitting, with many entrepreneurs realising there’s opportunities to be had in the pet industry.

The average dog walker now earns 20% more than the average UK salary. so it’s clearly a viable and potentially profitable business opportunity.

Of course you’ll need to have a genuine interest in dogs as well as a good knowledge of the various rules and regulations surrounding the industry – and it’s a fairly business marketplace.

However, with plenty of doting pet owners out there, finding a good niche can still present great opportunities.

Sound interesting? Then read our four simple steps to help you become top dog in the industry.

1. Experience is essential

While it’s not imperative to have a career background with animals, you should at least be confident around dogs and at the very least have experience in walking a family or friend’s pet.

The Kennel Club’s guidelines for people working with dogs advises “strong interpersonal and communication skills”, as well as “a high level of fitness” and, naturally, “an affinity with, and understanding of dogs” for anyone wishing to pursue a career with man’s best friend.

If you’re in need of experience in handling dogs, you might want to consider volunteering at your local kennels or rescue centre. They’ll often house a good range of dogs of various sizes, age and temperament, so you’ll be fit to face whatever comes your way.

Consider attending courses in animal first aid, pet medication or even animal psychology as gaining a diploma or certificate in any of these would showcase your commitment to the dog’s welfare and impress clients.

2. Remember, it’s a business

While any animal lover might feel like they’ve died and gone to doggy heaven, remind yourself that your dog walking business is just that – a business. As such, you’ll need to possess all the regular entrepreneurial skills required for founding and running a successful company.

Having a basic understanding of bookkeeping is important as you’ll need to be able to balance your own books and fill in your self-assessment tax return. Remember that this is your livelihood and not a hobby, your income should reflect this.

Similarly, a good understanding of marketing and self-promotion will be needed to get your business off the ground.

Finally, an ability to network and negotiate with both your customers and local animal industry is key. Never underestimate the potential for clients to try and negotiate price or you could find yourself working for substantially less than you might have hoped.

3. Be aware of the rules and regulations

Although there are relatively few regulations specifically targeted at dog walkers, businesses providing a service must get public liability insurance.

If this is the start-up business idea for you, be aware you may have to deal with dogs injuring other dogs or people while in your charge.

It’s vital to have the right insurance cover to deal with legal claims, should they arise.

They can help provide you with support and advice on dog walkers insurance and training, plus your membership will give your clients confidence.

To ensure you abide by key regulations, Narps suggest you should:

  • Meet owners prior to the first booking
  • Restrict the number of dogs walked to no more than four at a time
  • Keep records of all work undertaken
  • Protect clients’ personal information

All dogs in public must wear a collar with the owners name and address on it and you could be fined up to £1,000 if you fail to clean up its faeces.

While not the most exciting element of running your own business, it’s crucial you keep abreast of the latest rules and regulations to ensure you’re not jeopardising the safety of others or the reputation of your business.

4. Find a niche in the market

Given the popularity of setting up a dog walking business, it’s very probable you’ll have to find a niche to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

Above all else, carry out market research and see if there’s actually room in your area for another dog walker.

A simple google search or contacting NarpsUK will help a lot in this regard.

Consider offering pet sitting as well as dog walking. Much like babysitting, you’ll mind your client’s pets at their home while they are away, as well as feeding them and attending to any medical needs such as medication or fulfilling dietary requirements.

Having a diploma in pet medication would be advantageous in this instance as it would allow you to cater to a specific group of dogs.

Provided you are properly trained, you could also offer grooming services such as hair cutting or washing.

Offering one-to-one intense sessions with larger dogs could also widen your appeal.

Some dogs simply won’t be satisfied by a trip around the block and will require a more strenuous workout.

For more information on starting a dog walking business, take a look atour in-depth guide to help you prepare for the launch of your start-up.

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How to Become a Dog Walker – Wacky Hounds, brightening up your

#dog walking business

#

How to start a dog walking business.

Become a professional Dog Walker – The ultimate dog walking job – Dog walker opportunity

This short guide has been written with a view to explaining what is required to start up a professional dog walking business. It should give you a good idea about what you need to consider in your pursuit of becoming a full time Dog Walker. This guide is designed to give you an idea as to what is involved in starting up a professional dog walking business to run on a commercial full time basis. There are many adverts out there offering “dog walking jobs” but there is no need to look for employment as a dog walker or indeed to apply for dog walking jobs, when you can run your very own successful dog walking business.

There are many people, many dog loving people, who are in jobs that they dislike and would give their right arm for an opportunity to make a successful career in some form of dog care. Imagine keeping fit whilst being out in the fresh air and countryside. Could you think of a better way to make a living than keeping fit in the fresh air, whilst working with loads of different dogs every day? The list below will give you a good idea about how to become a self employed dog walker, so that you don’t have to apply for so called “dog walking jobs” or “dog walking opportunities”.

When starting a dog walking/pet sitting business, there is a lot of things to take into consideration:

Business Insurance – You will need quality business insurance which should include the likes of Public Liability, Care Custody & Control/Animal Liability, Professional Indemnity, Equipment Insurance, Personal Accident Cover, Vet Fees Extension, Loss of Key Cover, Glass Cover & Holiday Emergency Cover.

A professionally equipped van – For the transportation of dogs, your van should be professionally kitted out in the inside, be fitted with a moisture extraction system and your livery should be undertaken by professional Sign Writers.

Van Insurance – Suitable cover for a self-employed Dog Walker.

Relevant Local Council Licences – Depending on your local authority, there may be a variety of licences which you must hold, if you wish to operate as a Dog Walker in your local parks or you plan to offer dog home boarding services.

DBS/Disclosure Scotland – Undertake relevant police checks to inspire confidence in your future clients and to demonstrate trustworthiness.

Website – A modern, vibrant website is a must to convey professionalism and to allow prospective clients to find you easily.

Dog Walking/Boarding/Sitting – There is a variety of services that you can offer.

Branding/Trademark – In order to distinguish yourself from your peers, a great deal of thought should go into your brand and the protection of it.

Stationery – Your stationery should be consistent with your brand, and cover the likes of business cards, letterheads & envelopes.

Marketing – It is important to keep your advertising costs to a minimum when starting up any business, yet vital to find clients. Keeping your overheads as low as possible yet effective is advised.

Registration Forms – You will need an easily managed system to sign up new clients and will need well designed forms to cover the likes of Information Form, Terms and Conditions, Veterinary Authorisation, Walking Off the Lead and Customer Satisfaction Surveys.

Cover Letters – Easily edited to cover a wide range of scenarios, to save on administration time.

Charging Structure – The importance of this cannot be understated as there is a fine line between competitiveness and profitability.

Uniform – In accordance with your brand, you must be seen to be smart and professional at all times.

Key Management – It is extremely important that your key management systems are infallible.

Rota Management – In order to run an efficient operation, good time-management is essential.

Accounts – Not only is there a legal requirement for tax purposes, but tidy book keeping will save you a lot of time and expense.

Filing – You should have a tidy and appropriate system in place that complies with all relevant data protection rules and regulations.

Equipment – The types of equipment that you will need on a day to day business will include; Leads, Couplers, nail clippers, tick-removers, waterproof camera and phone, good boots and waterproof trousers and jacket.

Branded Dog I.D tags – Essential that all of your dogs wear these on every walk.

Training – It is not easy to take out a group of dogs for an hour’s walk. The practicalities of being a Dog Walker are far reaching, and you need to consider things like: basic group formation, collection of dogs, positioning of dogs in van, safe release of dogs from van, your walks, photo and video taking, using a dog whistle, potential hazards, safely getting your dogs back in the van and a suitable procedure for returning your dogs. With all of this in mind, you should undertake suitable before commencing with commercial dog walking.

Clients – Last but not least, you need to build and look after your client bank.

As you can see with this brief guide to becoming a dog walker, there is a lot of things to give consideration to. It may seem like a lot, but starting up a professional dog walking service requires a lot of planning.If, however, you would like the backing and help from an already successful and established dog walking company, then please take a look at our franchise page and download a free copy of our prospectus. Also, why not pop in to say hello to us on our facebook page, we won’t bite!

Have a Wacky day!

Join us at Wacky Hounds



Dog Walking Business #business #loans #with #bad #credit


#dog walking business

#

Love Dogs Start a Dog Walking Business

Everyone knows that dogs should be out walking just like us, dog owners today can lead extremely busy lives and due to busy schedules, physical disabilities or injuries, it may not be always possible for pet owners to walk their dogs themselves.

This is where you, as the owner of your own Dog Walking Business can step in and help out. Grab the Free video guide to learn more about starting your own dog walking business.

Ever thought about it? Doing something that you love, Walking 10-20 dogs a day at say $25 an hour, add a few add on services and you all of a sudden are making a great income running your own business without a whole lot of overheads. Understand that you will not need a significant investment to get started like other business models, No need to Build anything, carry large amounts of stock, pay rent etc. and you can do it all working out of your own home.

DogWalkingBusiness.com.au has been set up to help you achieve just that in just a few days, not months. Our goal is to have you walking your 1st dog within a few days. To get you started quickly here is an outline of part of what we provide:

  • Professional looking search engine friendly website
  • A fully optimised Google AdWords account set up
  • Pamphlets customized for you and your area
  • Customised stationary, business cards logos
  • Ongoing online marketing advice

Starting a dog walking business can end up earning you a very comfortable living while combining a love of animals and the outdoors. Getting started is relatively low cost and can be done in a few days. Go ahead and fill out your details to the right or give us a call on 1800 423 967 and we can have a friendly chat and answer questions a see what we can do to help you get started in your own business.



I want to be a dog walker #small #business #investment


#dog walking business

#

I want to be a dog walker. What will my salary be? Add to.

Job: Professional dog walker

Role: Dog walking is no day at the park. The role of a professional dog walker comes with a lot of responsibility, and requires relationship building with both pets and their owners. That is because dog walkers are often given access to their clients’ homes, and trusted with the care of their beloved animals. Doing so requires keeping a close eye on their pet at all times, which can be difficult when walking more than one dog at a time.

“I treat the dogs like my children,” said Jon Chaisson, the owner of Busters Dog Walking Co. in Toronto and chairman of Professional Dog Walkers Canada, a non-profit organization that provides resources for commercial dog walkers.

“When I go to the park, I’m making sure they’re not pooping [in inappropriate places], and if they are I’m picking it up, making sure they’re not misbehaving, doing inappropriate things. I have to watch out for things they’re not accustomed to, like some may not be friendly around smaller children, so I need to keep them away from smaller children.”

Salary. The salary of a dog walker will depend on how many clients they have, whether they are self-employed or work for a company, and the level of service they are providing. Dog walkers typically charge between $15 and $25 per dog a day for their services, and in an industry heavily dependent on word-of-mouth, salaries typically grow along with reputation.

As such, Mr. Chaisson predicts that starting salaries can be as low as $15,000 a year, as beginners often need to charge less in order to attract their first few clients. As they build their client base and renegotiate their fees, however, that salary can skyrocket with time.

“You can make $100,000 a year, but it’s a lot of work,” he said, adding that many well-established professional dog walkers make around $80,000 per year, but only if they’ve received positive references, built a large client base and are working as many hours as possible each day.

Education. While there are no educational requirements for commercial dog walkers, some municipalities enforce strict licensing standards. In the City of Toronto, for example, dog walkers need to obtain a $250 commercial dog walker permit in order to walk more than three dogs at a time (with a maximum of six), all of which must be on a leash unless in one of the city’s designated leash-free zones. Licensing laws vary between districts in Vancouver, where the price of a permit ranges from $350 in West Vancouver to $830 for a licence obtained in North Vancouver for businesses located outside of that district.

“It’s unique to big cities right now,” Mr. Chaisson said.

Obtaining a permit typically requires dog walkers to have liability insurance – at a cost of about $600 a year – and file taxes as registered businesses.

Dog walkers are also encouraged to get pet first aid and pet training certification, which can provide added credentials and allow them to charge more for their services, though it is not a requirement.

Job prospects: There is no shortage of dog lovers in Canada, many of whom need a little help taking care of their pets. The barrier to entry as a professional dog walker is quite low, but landing those first few clients can be difficult.

“It’s better if you can meet up with other dog walkers, start networking, and then they will refer people to you,” said Dianne Eibner, owner of Jog-a-Dog and founder of the Professional Dog Walkers Association International, which later became Professional Dog Walkers Canada. “That’s probably your best bet if you’re starting out; get to know other dog walkers who would be willing to refer you.”

Ms. Eibner adds that well-established dog walkers often reach their maximum capacity, and are typically willing to refer new clients to other dog walkers they trust.

Challenges: The biggest challenge dog walkers face in the great white north is undoubtedly the cold weather, which can make the job unbearable during the winter months.

“The winters can be hell, but you dress in layers and take the dogs out for shorter walks, because they do freeze as well,” Mr. Chaisson said.

Ms. Eibner, who is also the author of The Face in the Window – A Guide to Professional Dog Walking , adds that those who work as sole proprietors or run their own dog walking businesses also take on a lot of risk.

“It isn’t the most secure occupation,” she said. “If our client gets laid off from their work, we get laid off too.”

Why they do it: While the winter months make the outdoors the least pleasant aspect of the job, Mr. Chaisson says the opposite is true in summer. “You get to hang out in the sunshine all day while everybody else is stuck inside in their stuffy jobs,” he said.

Furthermore, since many professional dog walkers work as sole proprietors or owners of their own business, they often get to set their own hours and pay.

“I’m able to work only three or four hours a day, and get a full day’s pay,” Mr. Chaisson said. “For six hours a day you can be making upwards of $80,000 to $100,000 [a year] if you really want to put work into it.”

Ms. Eibner adds that most dog walkers simply love spending their time caring for and playing with dogs.

“I love my job, I love hanging out with dogs,” she said. “It’s almost not like a job, but I treat it like a job – you have to on the business end of it – but other times I’m rolling around on the ground with them, that’s the part I enjoy.”

Misconceptions: Mr. Chaisson says that many people believe it’s an easy job, failing to comprehend the level of responsibility that comes with the role.

“You have to be fully aware that these are other people’s property,” he said. “It’s like a daycare; you constantly have to watch over the dogs as if they were your own.”

Ms. Eibner adds that some dog walkers have given the rest a bad name, and that people make assumptions based on a few bad apples.

“Unfortunately, there have been such incidents where a dog walker has caused problems for other people and park users,” she said. “It’s not pleasant when we are deemed guilty by association if or when one dog walker is seen not picking up after their dogs.”

Want to read more stories from our Salaries Series? Find more here .

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How to Become a Dog Walker – Wacky Hounds, brightening up your

#dog walking business

#

How to start a dog walking business.

Become a professional Dog Walker – The ultimate dog walking job – Dog walker opportunity

This short guide has been written with a view to explaining what is required to start up a professional dog walking business. It should give you a good idea about what you need to consider in your pursuit of becoming a full time Dog Walker. This guide is designed to give you an idea as to what is involved in starting up a professional dog walking business to run on a commercial full time basis. There are many adverts out there offering “dog walking jobs” but there is no need to look for employment as a dog walker or indeed to apply for dog walking jobs, when you can run your very own successful dog walking business.

There are many people, many dog loving people, who are in jobs that they dislike and would give their right arm for an opportunity to make a successful career in some form of dog care. Imagine keeping fit whilst being out in the fresh air and countryside. Could you think of a better way to make a living than keeping fit in the fresh air, whilst working with loads of different dogs every day? The list below will give you a good idea about how to become a self employed dog walker, so that you don’t have to apply for so called “dog walking jobs” or “dog walking opportunities”.

When starting a dog walking/pet sitting business, there is a lot of things to take into consideration:

Business Insurance – You will need quality business insurance which should include the likes of Public Liability, Care Custody & Control/Animal Liability, Professional Indemnity, Equipment Insurance, Personal Accident Cover, Vet Fees Extension, Loss of Key Cover, Glass Cover & Holiday Emergency Cover.

A professionally equipped van – For the transportation of dogs, your van should be professionally kitted out in the inside, be fitted with a moisture extraction system and your livery should be undertaken by professional Sign Writers.

Van Insurance – Suitable cover for a self-employed Dog Walker.

Relevant Local Council Licences – Depending on your local authority, there may be a variety of licences which you must hold, if you wish to operate as a Dog Walker in your local parks or you plan to offer dog home boarding services.

DBS/Disclosure Scotland – Undertake relevant police checks to inspire confidence in your future clients and to demonstrate trustworthiness.

Website – A modern, vibrant website is a must to convey professionalism and to allow prospective clients to find you easily.

Dog Walking/Boarding/Sitting – There is a variety of services that you can offer.

Branding/Trademark – In order to distinguish yourself from your peers, a great deal of thought should go into your brand and the protection of it.

Stationery – Your stationery should be consistent with your brand, and cover the likes of business cards, letterheads & envelopes.

Marketing – It is important to keep your advertising costs to a minimum when starting up any business, yet vital to find clients. Keeping your overheads as low as possible yet effective is advised.

Registration Forms – You will need an easily managed system to sign up new clients and will need well designed forms to cover the likes of Information Form, Terms and Conditions, Veterinary Authorisation, Walking Off the Lead and Customer Satisfaction Surveys.

Cover Letters – Easily edited to cover a wide range of scenarios, to save on administration time.

Charging Structure – The importance of this cannot be understated as there is a fine line between competitiveness and profitability.

Uniform – In accordance with your brand, you must be seen to be smart and professional at all times.

Key Management – It is extremely important that your key management systems are infallible.

Rota Management – In order to run an efficient operation, good time-management is essential.

Accounts – Not only is there a legal requirement for tax purposes, but tidy book keeping will save you a lot of time and expense.

Filing – You should have a tidy and appropriate system in place that complies with all relevant data protection rules and regulations.

Equipment – The types of equipment that you will need on a day to day business will include; Leads, Couplers, nail clippers, tick-removers, waterproof camera and phone, good boots and waterproof trousers and jacket.

Branded Dog I.D tags – Essential that all of your dogs wear these on every walk.

Training – It is not easy to take out a group of dogs for an hour’s walk. The practicalities of being a Dog Walker are far reaching, and you need to consider things like: basic group formation, collection of dogs, positioning of dogs in van, safe release of dogs from van, your walks, photo and video taking, using a dog whistle, potential hazards, safely getting your dogs back in the van and a suitable procedure for returning your dogs. With all of this in mind, you should undertake suitable before commencing with commercial dog walking.

Clients – Last but not least, you need to build and look after your client bank.

As you can see with this brief guide to becoming a dog walker, there is a lot of things to give consideration to. It may seem like a lot, but starting up a professional dog walking service requires a lot of planning.If, however, you would like the backing and help from an already successful and established dog walking company, then please take a look at our franchise page and download a free copy of our prospectus. Also, why not pop in to say hello to us on our facebook page, we won’t bite!

Have a Wacky day!

Join us at Wacky Hounds



Dog Homeowners Liability Insurance #dog #liability #insurance, #dog #homeowners #insurance


#

Dog Liability Insurance

Contact Us Now For A Free Dog Liability Insurance Quote

You don’t have to move! You don’t have to give up your beloved family member!

Einhorn Insurance is proud to offer dog liability insurance to responsible owners of “dangerous” breeds (as labeled by most insurance companies). Einhorn Insurance does NOT agree with the way most insurance companies stereotype strictly by a dog’s breed. We look at each dog individually and do not judge based on breed.

As proud Pit Bull owners and advocates, we are especially sensitive to this issue. We couldn’t imagine being discriminated against because our Pit Bulls are considered to be “dangerous” by most insurance carriers (even though they have never bit a person or animal). Einhorn Insurance offers pit bull friendly insurance and insurance for ALL dog breeds.

Many people call us because they are having difficulties finding a place to rent with their dogs. For helpful tips on renting with a Pit Bull or any other dog, please visit our guide: Renting with Dogs

Find Out More About Dog Liability Insurance:

We can even help you with a policy if your dog has been deemed:

  • dangerous
  • vicious
  • potentially dangerous
  • potentially vicious
  • a public nuisance
  • We know as well as you do, it’s not the dog, it’s the owner. Our policies even provide insurance coverage for your dog(s) when you are away from home. So, you can be at the dog park and you’re still covered!

    Please click here to GET A QUOTE or complete the form at the bottom of this page so we can help you with dog liability insurance or insurance for your dog.

    While most insurance companies won’t provide you with canine liability insurance if you own a dog on the “blacklisted” breed list, Einhorn Insurance can.

    According to most insurance companies, the following are the more common “Dangerous Breeds” or “Blacklisted Breeds” :

    • Pit Bulls Staffordshire Terriers
    • Doberman Pinschers
    • Rottweilers
    • Chows
    • Great Danes
    • Presa Canarios
    • Akitas
    • Alaskan Malamutes
    • German Shepherds
    • Siberian Huskies
    • Wolf-hybrids
    • Or a mix of any of the above

    If you’ve been insured with the same insurance company for years, don’t assume your policy includes coverage for your dog(s). Insurance companies regularly modify what their policy will cover (and what it won’t cover). Your company may not know you have a “dangerous” dog. If they find out, your policy may immediately cancel or be non-renewed.

    Keep in mind, not all dog claims are due to dog aggression or dog bites. Let’s say you have a SUPER FRIENDLY Pit Bull with a very wiggly butt and they greet your neighbor with a jump. Your neighbor falls and hits their head on a curb; this is a potential dog claim. This exact scenario happened to one of our clients; the injured person had around $40,000 in medical expenses.

    Would you be able to pay $40,000 out of pocket just because your dog jumped on someone to say “hello?”

    As dog lovers, Einhorn Insurance has worked with Pit Bull Rescues for 10 years. We are currently involved with 50+ dog rescues/non-profit 501(c)3 organizations and donate to them monthly. Most of these rescues are focused on the “dangerous” breeds: Pit Bulls, Staffordshire Terriers, German Shepherds, Dobermans and Rottweilers.

    Einhorn Insurance has access to a very exclusive and elite policy for dog rescues that work with ALL BREEDS. YES, this even includes Pit Bull Rescues. As long as you are a 501(c)3 or have already submitted your application for your 501(c)3 filing, we can help you with a policy for your dog rescue organization.

    Our General Liability policy offers coverage for:

    • Dog Bites or Damage Caused by Rescue Dogs
    • Foster Homes
    • Care, Custody and Control
    • Professional Liability
    • Non-Owned Autos and Hired Autos
    • Additional Insureds

    Einhorn Insurance encourages landlords to rent to RESPONSIBLE dog owners. They make great tenants and are usually very appreciative for the opportunity. Additionally, they tend to stay longer and are willing to pay a higher rent to keep their family together.

    We personally own income property and all of our tenants own Pit Bulls. As landlords, we require our tenants have coverage for their dogs and list us as an Additional Insured on their dog liability policy.

    For more information regarding insurance for your dog, insurance for your rescue or if you are a Landlord whose tenants have dogs, please hit the GET A QUOTE button.

    Our CBOs (Chief Barking Officers) are looking forward to helping you and your canine family members with dog liability insurance.



    Dog Walking Business #small #business #owners


    #dog walking business

    #

    Love Dogs Start a Dog Walking Business

    Everyone knows that dogs should be out walking just like us, dog owners today can lead extremely busy lives and due to busy schedules, physical disabilities or injuries, it may not be always possible for pet owners to walk their dogs themselves.

    This is where you, as the owner of your own Dog Walking Business can step in and help out. Grab the Free video guide to learn more about starting your own dog walking business.

    Ever thought about it? Doing something that you love, Walking 10-20 dogs a day at say $25 an hour, add a few add on services and you all of a sudden are making a great income running your own business without a whole lot of overheads. Understand that you will not need a significant investment to get started like other business models, No need to Build anything, carry large amounts of stock, pay rent etc. and you can do it all working out of your own home.

    DogWalkingBusiness.com.au has been set up to help you achieve just that in just a few days, not months. Our goal is to have you walking your 1st dog within a few days. To get you started quickly here is an outline of part of what we provide:

    • Professional looking search engine friendly website
    • A fully optimised Google AdWords account set up
    • Pamphlets customized for you and your area
    • Customised stationary, business cards logos
    • Ongoing online marketing advice

    Starting a dog walking business can end up earning you a very comfortable living while combining a love of animals and the outdoors. Getting started is relatively low cost and can be done in a few days. Go ahead and fill out your details to the right or give us a call on 1800 423 967 and we can have a friendly chat and answer questions a see what we can do to help you get started in your own business.



    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps: Starting a

    #dog walking business

    #

    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps

    With recent figures showing that Brits spent more than £4bn on their beloved pets in 2015, you’d be barking mad to think the recession has impacted on the UK’s pet spend.

    Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

    Marking a 10% increase on pooch spending from 2010, it’s not only large retailers benefitting, with many entrepreneurs realising there’s opportunities to be had in the pet industry.

    The average dog walker now earns 20% more than the average UK salary. so it’s clearly a viable and potentially profitable business opportunity.

    Of course you’ll need to have a genuine interest in dogs as well as a good knowledge of the various rules and regulations surrounding the industry – and it’s a fairly business marketplace.

    However, with plenty of doting pet owners out there, finding a good niche can still present great opportunities.

    Sound interesting? Then read our four simple steps to help you become top dog in the industry.

    1. Experience is essential

    While it’s not imperative to have a career background with animals, you should at least be confident around dogs and at the very least have experience in walking a family or friend’s pet.

    The Kennel Club’s guidelines for people working with dogs advises “strong interpersonal and communication skills”, as well as “a high level of fitness” and, naturally, “an affinity with, and understanding of dogs” for anyone wishing to pursue a career with man’s best friend.

    If you’re in need of experience in handling dogs, you might want to consider volunteering at your local kennels or rescue centre. They’ll often house a good range of dogs of various sizes, age and temperament, so you’ll be fit to face whatever comes your way.

    Consider attending courses in animal first aid, pet medication or even animal psychology as gaining a diploma or certificate in any of these would showcase your commitment to the dog’s welfare and impress clients.

    2. Remember, it’s a business

    While any animal lover might feel like they’ve died and gone to doggy heaven, remind yourself that your dog walking business is just that – a business. As such, you’ll need to possess all the regular entrepreneurial skills required for founding and running a successful company.

    Having a basic understanding of bookkeeping is important as you’ll need to be able to balance your own books and fill in your self-assessment tax return. Remember that this is your livelihood and not a hobby, your income should reflect this.

    Similarly, a good understanding of marketing and self-promotion will be needed to get your business off the ground.

    Finally, an ability to network and negotiate with both your customers and local animal industry is key. Never underestimate the potential for clients to try and negotiate price or you could find yourself working for substantially less than you might have hoped.

    3. Be aware of the rules and regulations

    Although there are relatively few regulations specifically targeted at dog walkers, businesses providing a service must get public liability insurance.

    If this is the start-up business idea for you, be aware you may have to deal with dogs injuring other dogs or people while in your charge.

    It’s vital to have the right insurance cover to deal with legal claims, should they arise.

    They can help provide you with support and advice on dog walkers insurance and training, plus your membership will give your clients confidence.

    To ensure you abide by key regulations, Narps suggest you should:

    • Meet owners prior to the first booking
    • Restrict the number of dogs walked to no more than four at a time
    • Keep records of all work undertaken
    • Protect clients’ personal information

    All dogs in public must wear a collar with the owners name and address on it and you could be fined up to £1,000 if you fail to clean up its faeces.

    While not the most exciting element of running your own business, it’s crucial you keep abreast of the latest rules and regulations to ensure you’re not jeopardising the safety of others or the reputation of your business.

    4. Find a niche in the market

    Given the popularity of setting up a dog walking business, it’s very probable you’ll have to find a niche to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

    Above all else, carry out market research and see if there’s actually room in your area for another dog walker.

    A simple google search or contacting NarpsUK will help a lot in this regard.

    Consider offering pet sitting as well as dog walking. Much like babysitting, you’ll mind your client’s pets at their home while they are away, as well as feeding them and attending to any medical needs such as medication or fulfilling dietary requirements.

    Having a diploma in pet medication would be advantageous in this instance as it would allow you to cater to a specific group of dogs.

    Provided you are properly trained, you could also offer grooming services such as hair cutting or washing.

    Offering one-to-one intense sessions with larger dogs could also widen your appeal.

    Some dogs simply won’t be satisfied by a trip around the block and will require a more strenuous workout.

    For more information on starting a dog walking business, take a look atour in-depth guide to help you prepare for the launch of your start-up.

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    BIG RED DOG named to the Fast 50 by Austin Business Journal

    #austin business journal

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    BIG RED DOG Named to the Fast 50 by Austin Business Journal

    August 31, 2016 by Will Schnier P.E.

    BIG RED DOG Engineering and Consulting was again named one of the 50 Fastest Growing Private Companies in central Texas by Austin Business Journal for the 2015 fiscal year. This award is a testament to our amazing clients and team members.

    To qualify, companies must have experienced dramatic revenue growth during the past three years. Financial data is submitted by the companies, verified by a third party and then we rank the top 50 according to compounded revenue growth.

    We were also honored with the same award in 2013 and 2014 .

    Read more on the Austin Business Journal website .

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    • BIG RED DOG Celebrates our First 5 Years
    • Award Winning BIG RED Blog Award From www.civilengineeringschools.org

    Written by Will Schnier P.E.

    Will Schnier is the Chief Executive Officer of BIG RED DOG Engineering | Consulting. Will received his BSCE from Purdue University and co-founded BIG RED DOG Engineering and Consulting in 2009. Since starting the firm in 2009, BIG RED DOG has grown to over 100 team members with offices in Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio. BIG RED DOG has garnered awards for being one of the 50 fastest growing companies in Texas (Business Journal’s Fast 50 in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015) and an ENR top 100 Design Firm in Texas and Louisiana (2012, 2103, 2014, 2015). Mr. Schnier is very well versed in the project review and development permitting process having worked closely and very successfully with City and County review staff, neighborhood associations, environmental groups, and public boards and councils. He has been responsible for the project management, engineering design, and regulatory permitting of hundreds of single family subdivision projects, mixed use and multifamily residential developments, industrial facilities and oil and gas development projects throughout Texas. He is the author of two publications: “Land Subdivision – A Practical Guide for Central Texas” and “The Book on License Agreements in the City of Austin”. Will was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA) in 2014 and served as Mayor Lee Leffingwell’s appointment to the City of Austin Zoning Board of Adjustment from 2011 to 2015.



    Dog Bite Victims – Dog Bite Injuries #dog #bite #victim, #dog #bite

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    Dog bite victims.

    Nationwide, the rate of dog bite injuries is on the rise. The cost of treating these injuries is rising even faster. In 2003, the average dog bite claim was $19,162. In 2016, the cost rose to $33,230 compared with $27,862 in 2013, according to the Insurance Information Institute. Dog bite claims account for over one-third of all homeowners insurance liability claims, costing over $600 million in 2016. The average cost per claim nationally has risen more than 86 percent from 2003 to 2016. 1

    Who pays the medical costs?

    1 of every 6 dog bite injuries requires medical care; 1 of every 14 requires emergency care. 2 The question of “Who pays?” is determined by state law. Some states are governed by a One Bite rule. which requires victims to prove the dog owner knew or should have known of the dangerous propensities of the dog (such as by a previous bite) in order to receive compensation. Nearly 30 states impose statutory strict liability making a dog owner legally liable to a victim who was bitten.

    Tennessee is a strict liability state, but contains a “residential exclusion ” that omits liability when the attack occurs on the dog owner’s property unless the victim can prove the same burden of proof required by the One Bite rule. This exclusion prohibits the majority of dog bite victims from receiving compensation — over 50% of all dog bites occur on the dog owner’s property. 3 Thus, Tennessee is known as a “mixed dog bite statute state,” along with New York and Georgia.

    The usual method of getting medical reimbursement is through the dog owner’s homeowners insurance policy, most policies provide $100,000 to $300,000 in liability coverage. 4 If the dog owner is a renter and uninsured, the victim is usually out of luck unless the landlord or property owner can be held liable. This is also true for victims of attacks by pit bulls, rottweilers and other known dangerous dog breeds. as many insurance carriers refuse to insure these breeds at all.

    If the dog owner is insured, the victim can expect several years before payment. Dog bite injuries take time to heal. Settlement negotiations with an insurance company usually start after healing completes. In the meanwhile, the victim incurs many costs. If the injuries required hospitalization, the victim can expect to stay 3 days. 5 If surgery was required — as it often is for attacks involving facial and bone injuries — a victim’s first night in care can easily reach $20 thousand dollars.

    Related articles:

    Types of injuries inflicted by dogs

    Injuries inflicted by dogs can be devastating, especially to young children. The small height of a child almost always results in facial injuries. Repairing these injuries may require immediate reconstructive surgery with additional surgical procedures over time. Techniques such as skin grafting and microsurgical repair also may require multiple procedures, as do scar diminishment treatments, such as: dermabrasion (sanding of the skin) and pressure scar modification.

    According to a 2010 study by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the most common principal diagnoses for dog bite-related hospitalizations included skin and subcutaneous tissue infections (43.2%), open wounds of extremities (22.1%), and open wounds of the head, neck, and trunk (10.5%). Other chief diagnoses included fracture of upper limb, infective arthritis and osteomyelitis. septicemia. crushing injury or internal injury and fracture of lower limb. 6

    Related articles:

    Psychological damage

    Nearly all dog bite victims suffer psychological injury. including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Even with treatment, fear of another attack may never fade. Each time a victim walks down a sidewalk, strolls through a park or visits a dog owner’s home, the trauma returns. Man’s best friend — to the irony and horror of a dog bite victim — is fully integrated into our society. Stories abound, particularity about senior citizens, who are terrified to leave their home after a serious dog attack.

    In an article published by The Mercury News, Angela Silva talks about her life after a horrific dog attack. In September of 2007, a neighbor’s pit bull suddenly charged into Angela’s garage in Fremont, California as she was cleaning out her car. The dog lunged at her 7-month old child. In an act of quick thinking, Silva placed her son into a nearby garbage can to protect him and used her left arm as a shield. The pit bull shredded through Silva’s arm before help arrived.

    Nearly four months after the attack, Silva told the Mercury News that she has yet to take a walk outside and that she gets “fresh air” by sitting on her porch behind a new wooden fence that her boyfriend built. To further distance herself from the dog’s owner, who lived next door, Silva moved several neighborhoods away. But even in her new home, Silva said she still has a stack of medical bills she is unsure how to pay and continues to have dreams filled with mad, vicious dogs. 7

    Related articles:

    Human relationship damage

    Nearly all dog bites involve a complex mixture of human relationship bonds. A dog bite victim frequently knows the owner of the dog, who may be a family member, relative, neighbor or friend. Many dog owners minimize the seriousness of injury inflicted by the dog or blame the victim for the attack. While blaming the victim is a universal phenomenon, it is nearly always the case in dog attacks. This may be true because dogs are a metaphorical “extension” of their owner.

    Most states do not automatically euthanize a dog after it inflicts its first, second or even third bite to a person. This sets up an adversarial relationship when the dog owner is a neighbor. Too often, once the dog is returned home after a quarantine period following the bite, the owner defies leash and constraint laws. 8 Victims in these instances become imprisoned in their own home. Even if authorities can witness and cite the dog owner for violations, it’s usually just a small monetary fine.

    When the attack stems from a dog owned by a family member, even more disturbing results can occur. After years of a strong bond, relationships are often left in shambles, and for the primary reason that the dog can’t be blamed, yet neither can its owner. The human relationship damage is always two-part. The first part occurs just after the attack. The second part occurs over a period of years as the victim tries to gain medical reimbursement through lawsuits or other means.

    Related articles:

    1. Dog Bite Liability. Insurance Information Institute, April 2017.
    2. Nonfatal Dog Bite-Related Injuries Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments – United States, 2001. by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), 2003; 52(26): 605-610.
    3. Incidence of Dog Bite Injuries Treated in Emergency Departments (1992-1994) by H. Weiss, D. Friedman and J. Coben, JAMA. 1998
    4. Dog Bite Liability. Insurance Information Institute, April 2017.
    5. Emergency Department Visits and Inpatient Stays Involving Dog Bites, 2008. by Laurel Holmquist, M.A. and Anne Elixhauser, Ph.D. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. November 2010.
    6. Emergency Department Visits and Inpatient Stays Involving Dog Bites, 2008. by Laurel Holmquist, M.A. and Anne Elixhauser, Ph.D. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. November 2010.
    7. Scares Serve As a Reminder of Good, Bad in Others. by Lisa Fernandez, The Mercury News. December 16, 2007.
    8. Some cases involve serious harassment. The family victimized by the dogs’ owners in this case moved to an undisclosed location prior to filing a civil complaint against them. Woman sues pit bull owner, others. by Donna M. Perry, Sun Journal, May 7, 2008 (www.sunjournal.com)