Tag : Dog

Miami Pet Sitting and Dog Walking, Grove Pet Service, dog walking business.#Dog

dog walking business

  • Dog walking business

Dog walking business

  • Dog walking business

  • Dog walking business

  • Dog walking business

  • Dog walking business

    We are a full service pet care business dedicated to providing you with peace of mind and your best friend with the attention and care they deserve.

    We serve most of Miami-Dade County. For more information visit our service area page.

    Ready to get started? Start Here.

    Easy, online process and you can conveniently schedule the services you need.

    We have mid-day walks that will give your dog much needed relief and playtime.

    You can trust us to feed, play and care for your pets while you are away. We customize our packages to your pets to suit their unique and individual needs.

    We have mix and match services for every budget. Visit our services page or contact us for more information.

    We are licensed, insured and bonded.

    Not just for Dogs! We care for all types of pets, Cats, Rabbits, Hamsters, Birds, Fish, Reptiles, etc.

    Questions? Visit FAQ s, Contact Us or Call us 786-464-0665



  • How Much To Charge For Dog Walking, dog walking business.#Dog #walking #business


    Dogs Love Running! – the blog for pet owners and pet professionals

    In addition, you can now download our free Ultimate Pricing Strategy Workbook to help you figure out exactly how much you should be charging for your local area. Get it all here.

    Dog walking business

    Our original article begins below, but you should really read our updated version here.

    So you’re thinking about starting a dog walking business. One of the first things you’re going to consider is:Dog walking business

    • how much to charge for dog walking?
    • how much to charge for pet sitting?
    • how much to charge for any related services?

    Think about this before you get too far into your business because if you can’t charge enough, you won’t make enough. And if you don’t make enough to make ends meet (or make you happy), then there’s no point to the business, is there?

    If you’re charging by time, then you might just have one flat rate for everything. As an example, you decide to charge $10 for 15 minutes of your time.

    So, let’s say you’re going to visit a dog for 15 minutes. And the client wants you to take the dog out for walk around the block, bring in the mail, and feed Fido a bit of food before you leave. And the next day, the client wants you just to take Fido out for a walk and that’s it. In the 15 minutes, you have enough time to take 3 spins around the block, not just the one you did yesterday.

    In both of these cases, you spend just 15 minutes with Fido. Regardless of what you did within those 15 minutes, it was still the same amount of time both days. So, each day is $10 because it was just 15 minutes of your time.

    Another way to charge is by the service you perform. In this situation, you’re adding fees for each thing you accomplish.

    Going back to Fido, let’s say you tell the client that it’s now $10 for a dog walk (not for 15 minutes). Maybe they ask a few questions about what the walk entails so you have to clarify about how long it lasts and when you’ll arrive. Now let’s say on one particular day they need you to give Fido a pill. So, you say it’s $2 more to give medication. You’re charging the client to perform this service (regardless of how long it takes you). Similarly, you’ll bring in the mail for $1 extra if they want. Get the idea?

    Ok, so you’ve figured out how you’re going to charge. Now, figure out how much to charge.

    The best place to start is by researching your competition. Check their websites and/or call them up.

    Do you see any patterns in what people are charging? Are they all charging the same amount? Are there drastic differences between services? How many charge by time? How many by the service? How many upcharge for evening/weekend visits or other non-standard times? What else do you find interesting about these competitors?

    Take all that knowledge and figure out how you can compete in the market to see if you can be a market leader, stay right within the average, or try to offer the cheapest prices. See our first post on how to start a dog walking business for ideas on how you might be able to be “special” in your local market so that you can get customers.

    By now you’re probably wondering “ok, but how MUCH do I charge for dog walking?”

    The bad news is that there is no one single answer. If I told you $10 for 15 minutes, that might be a terrible answer based on your local market and the service you provide. Or, I could possibly tell you $30 for 15 minutes and it might be a great answer.

    The good news is that we’ve outlined some basic steps on what to ask yourself so that you can figure out what’s best for exactly the type of business you’d like to run. Still have questions, why don’t you contact us and see how we do it?

    Dog walking businessFound this article interesting/entertaining/educational? Subscribe to the Dogs Love Running! blog for free via RSS and get live updates of new articles as they’re posted.

    Dog walking business



    Dog Poop Clean Up Pooper Scooper Pet Waste Removal Dog Walk: POOP

    Poop 911 We Scoop Dog Poop

    Afraid to be in your own backyard?

    Dog poop cleanup service is Poop 911’s specialty. POOP 911 can poop scoop your yard and remove toxic and unpleasant dog poop. We offer a large selection of other services to help you enjoy your yard with your family and pets alike. Dog waste facts

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    Recent News

    Tulsa Man Puts Med School On Hold To Become ‘Poop Guy’

    Dog walking business

    TULSA, Oklahoma — Everyone who knew Jon Wood growing up was sure he would become a doctor. He graduated from the University of Tulsa with all the prerequisites for med school including a degree in biology.

    So, what did he do? He started his own business. In Tulsa, Jon Wood is Poop 911.

    Wood started his business a couple of years ago while he was still at the University of Tulsa. “I got my degree in biology with a minor in chemistry,” he said. “I have all the prerequisites to go to med school.” But the entrepreneurial bug bit him. Now, the kids in his neighborhood call him the poop guy.

    “Yesterday I got a call asking if I’d do their horses and goats,” Wood said. No, Wood just sticks to dogs.

    There may be those who think why bother, it’s just fertilizer. Oh, but it’s not, he says. “If left unpicked up it will cause brown spots in your grass because it is burning your grass,” Wood said. “It’s very acidic.” That’s because of the dog’s high protein diet.

    Ben Franklin said once “two things in life are certain, death and taxes.” Jon Wood has found another. So for now business is good. He’ll think about being a doctor someday, but for now he’s happy being the poop guy.

    You can find Jon Wood by calling 877-Poop911.



    Dog Walking Business #cheap #business #ideas


    #dog walking business

    #

    Love Dogs Start a Dog Walking Business

    Everyone knows that dogs should be out walking just like us, dog owners today can lead extremely busy lives and due to busy schedules, physical disabilities or injuries, it may not be always possible for pet owners to walk their dogs themselves.

    This is where you, as the owner of your own Dog Walking Business can step in and help out. Grab the Free video guide to learn more about starting your own dog walking business.

    Ever thought about it? Doing something that you love, Walking 10-20 dogs a day at say $25 an hour, add a few add on services and you all of a sudden are making a great income running your own business without a whole lot of overheads. Understand that you will not need a significant investment to get started like other business models, No need to Build anything, carry large amounts of stock, pay rent etc. and you can do it all working out of your own home.

    DogWalkingBusiness.com.au has been set up to help you achieve just that in just a few days, not months. Our goal is to have you walking your 1st dog within a few days. To get you started quickly here is an outline of part of what we provide:

    • Professional looking search engine friendly website
    • A fully optimised Google AdWords account set up
    • Pamphlets customized for you and your area
    • Customised stationary, business cards logos
    • Ongoing online marketing advice

    Starting a dog walking business can end up earning you a very comfortable living while combining a love of animals and the outdoors. Getting started is relatively low cost and can be done in a few days. Go ahead and fill out your details to the right or give us a call on 1800 423 967 and we can have a friendly chat and answer questions a see what we can do to help you get started in your own business.



    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps: Starting a

    #dog walking business

    #

    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps

    With recent figures showing that Brits spent more than £4bn on their beloved pets in 2015, you’d be barking mad to think the recession has impacted on the UK’s pet spend.

    Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

    Marking a 10% increase on pooch spending from 2010, it’s not only large retailers benefitting, with many entrepreneurs realising there’s opportunities to be had in the pet industry.

    The average dog walker now earns 20% more than the average UK salary. so it’s clearly a viable and potentially profitable business opportunity.

    Of course you’ll need to have a genuine interest in dogs as well as a good knowledge of the various rules and regulations surrounding the industry – and it’s a fairly business marketplace.

    However, with plenty of doting pet owners out there, finding a good niche can still present great opportunities.

    Sound interesting? Then read our four simple steps to help you become top dog in the industry.

    1. Experience is essential

    While it’s not imperative to have a career background with animals, you should at least be confident around dogs and at the very least have experience in walking a family or friend’s pet.

    The Kennel Club’s guidelines for people working with dogs advises “strong interpersonal and communication skills”, as well as “a high level of fitness” and, naturally, “an affinity with, and understanding of dogs” for anyone wishing to pursue a career with man’s best friend.

    If you’re in need of experience in handling dogs, you might want to consider volunteering at your local kennels or rescue centre. They’ll often house a good range of dogs of various sizes, age and temperament, so you’ll be fit to face whatever comes your way.

    Consider attending courses in animal first aid, pet medication or even animal psychology as gaining a diploma or certificate in any of these would showcase your commitment to the dog’s welfare and impress clients.

    2. Remember, it’s a business

    While any animal lover might feel like they’ve died and gone to doggy heaven, remind yourself that your dog walking business is just that – a business. As such, you’ll need to possess all the regular entrepreneurial skills required for founding and running a successful company.

    Having a basic understanding of bookkeeping is important as you’ll need to be able to balance your own books and fill in your self-assessment tax return. Remember that this is your livelihood and not a hobby, your income should reflect this.

    Similarly, a good understanding of marketing and self-promotion will be needed to get your business off the ground.

    Finally, an ability to network and negotiate with both your customers and local animal industry is key. Never underestimate the potential for clients to try and negotiate price or you could find yourself working for substantially less than you might have hoped.

    3. Be aware of the rules and regulations

    Although there are relatively few regulations specifically targeted at dog walkers, businesses providing a service must get public liability insurance.

    If this is the start-up business idea for you, be aware you may have to deal with dogs injuring other dogs or people while in your charge.

    It’s vital to have the right insurance cover to deal with legal claims, should they arise.

    They can help provide you with support and advice on dog walkers insurance and training, plus your membership will give your clients confidence.

    To ensure you abide by key regulations, Narps suggest you should:

    • Meet owners prior to the first booking
    • Restrict the number of dogs walked to no more than four at a time
    • Keep records of all work undertaken
    • Protect clients’ personal information

    All dogs in public must wear a collar with the owners name and address on it and you could be fined up to £1,000 if you fail to clean up its faeces.

    While not the most exciting element of running your own business, it’s crucial you keep abreast of the latest rules and regulations to ensure you’re not jeopardising the safety of others or the reputation of your business.

    4. Find a niche in the market

    Given the popularity of setting up a dog walking business, it’s very probable you’ll have to find a niche to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

    Above all else, carry out market research and see if there’s actually room in your area for another dog walker.

    A simple google search or contacting NarpsUK will help a lot in this regard.

    Consider offering pet sitting as well as dog walking. Much like babysitting, you’ll mind your client’s pets at their home while they are away, as well as feeding them and attending to any medical needs such as medication or fulfilling dietary requirements.

    Having a diploma in pet medication would be advantageous in this instance as it would allow you to cater to a specific group of dogs.

    Provided you are properly trained, you could also offer grooming services such as hair cutting or washing.

    Offering one-to-one intense sessions with larger dogs could also widen your appeal.

    Some dogs simply won’t be satisfied by a trip around the block and will require a more strenuous workout.

    For more information on starting a dog walking business, take a look atour in-depth guide to help you prepare for the launch of your start-up.

    Comments

    Useful business start up tools

    Forum post of the week

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    I want to be a dog walker #small #business #admin


    #dog walking business

    #

    I want to be a dog walker. What will my salary be? Add to.

    Job: Professional dog walker

    Role: Dog walking is no day at the park. The role of a professional dog walker comes with a lot of responsibility, and requires relationship building with both pets and their owners. That is because dog walkers are often given access to their clients’ homes, and trusted with the care of their beloved animals. Doing so requires keeping a close eye on their pet at all times, which can be difficult when walking more than one dog at a time.

    “I treat the dogs like my children,” said Jon Chaisson, the owner of Busters Dog Walking Co. in Toronto and chairman of Professional Dog Walkers Canada, a non-profit organization that provides resources for commercial dog walkers.

    “When I go to the park, I’m making sure they’re not pooping [in inappropriate places], and if they are I’m picking it up, making sure they’re not misbehaving, doing inappropriate things. I have to watch out for things they’re not accustomed to, like some may not be friendly around smaller children, so I need to keep them away from smaller children.”

    Salary. The salary of a dog walker will depend on how many clients they have, whether they are self-employed or work for a company, and the level of service they are providing. Dog walkers typically charge between $15 and $25 per dog a day for their services, and in an industry heavily dependent on word-of-mouth, salaries typically grow along with reputation.

    As such, Mr. Chaisson predicts that starting salaries can be as low as $15,000 a year, as beginners often need to charge less in order to attract their first few clients. As they build their client base and renegotiate their fees, however, that salary can skyrocket with time.

    “You can make $100,000 a year, but it’s a lot of work,” he said, adding that many well-established professional dog walkers make around $80,000 per year, but only if they’ve received positive references, built a large client base and are working as many hours as possible each day.

    Education. While there are no educational requirements for commercial dog walkers, some municipalities enforce strict licensing standards. In the City of Toronto, for example, dog walkers need to obtain a $250 commercial dog walker permit in order to walk more than three dogs at a time (with a maximum of six), all of which must be on a leash unless in one of the city’s designated leash-free zones. Licensing laws vary between districts in Vancouver, where the price of a permit ranges from $350 in West Vancouver to $830 for a licence obtained in North Vancouver for businesses located outside of that district.

    “It’s unique to big cities right now,” Mr. Chaisson said.

    Obtaining a permit typically requires dog walkers to have liability insurance – at a cost of about $600 a year – and file taxes as registered businesses.

    Dog walkers are also encouraged to get pet first aid and pet training certification, which can provide added credentials and allow them to charge more for their services, though it is not a requirement.

    Job prospects: There is no shortage of dog lovers in Canada, many of whom need a little help taking care of their pets. The barrier to entry as a professional dog walker is quite low, but landing those first few clients can be difficult.

    “It’s better if you can meet up with other dog walkers, start networking, and then they will refer people to you,” said Dianne Eibner, owner of Jog-a-Dog and founder of the Professional Dog Walkers Association International, which later became Professional Dog Walkers Canada. “That’s probably your best bet if you’re starting out; get to know other dog walkers who would be willing to refer you.”

    Ms. Eibner adds that well-established dog walkers often reach their maximum capacity, and are typically willing to refer new clients to other dog walkers they trust.

    Challenges: The biggest challenge dog walkers face in the great white north is undoubtedly the cold weather, which can make the job unbearable during the winter months.

    “The winters can be hell, but you dress in layers and take the dogs out for shorter walks, because they do freeze as well,” Mr. Chaisson said.

    Ms. Eibner, who is also the author of The Face in the Window – A Guide to Professional Dog Walking , adds that those who work as sole proprietors or run their own dog walking businesses also take on a lot of risk.

    “It isn’t the most secure occupation,” she said. “If our client gets laid off from their work, we get laid off too.”

    Why they do it: While the winter months make the outdoors the least pleasant aspect of the job, Mr. Chaisson says the opposite is true in summer. “You get to hang out in the sunshine all day while everybody else is stuck inside in their stuffy jobs,” he said.

    Furthermore, since many professional dog walkers work as sole proprietors or owners of their own business, they often get to set their own hours and pay.

    “I’m able to work only three or four hours a day, and get a full day’s pay,” Mr. Chaisson said. “For six hours a day you can be making upwards of $80,000 to $100,000 [a year] if you really want to put work into it.”

    Ms. Eibner adds that most dog walkers simply love spending their time caring for and playing with dogs.

    “I love my job, I love hanging out with dogs,” she said. “It’s almost not like a job, but I treat it like a job – you have to on the business end of it – but other times I’m rolling around on the ground with them, that’s the part I enjoy.”

    Misconceptions: Mr. Chaisson says that many people believe it’s an easy job, failing to comprehend the level of responsibility that comes with the role.

    “You have to be fully aware that these are other people’s property,” he said. “It’s like a daycare; you constantly have to watch over the dogs as if they were your own.”

    Ms. Eibner adds that some dog walkers have given the rest a bad name, and that people make assumptions based on a few bad apples.

    “Unfortunately, there have been such incidents where a dog walker has caused problems for other people and park users,” she said. “It’s not pleasant when we are deemed guilty by association if or when one dog walker is seen not picking up after their dogs.”

    Want to read more stories from our Salaries Series? Find more here .

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    BIG RED DOG named to the Fast 50 by Austin Business Journal

    #austin business journal

    #

    BIG RED DOG Named to the Fast 50 by Austin Business Journal

    August 31, 2016 by Will Schnier P.E.

    BIG RED DOG Engineering and Consulting was again named one of the 50 Fastest Growing Private Companies in central Texas by Austin Business Journal for the 2015 fiscal year. This award is a testament to our amazing clients and team members.

    To qualify, companies must have experienced dramatic revenue growth during the past three years. Financial data is submitted by the companies, verified by a third party and then we rank the top 50 according to compounded revenue growth.

    We were also honored with the same award in 2013 and 2014 .

    Read more on the Austin Business Journal website .

    Related Posts

    • BIG RED DOG Named to ABJ s Fast 50!
    • BIG RED DOG Enters MEP Engineering Business Acquires Johnson Consulting Engineers
    • 2014 San Antonio Business Journal Best in Commercial Real Estate Awards
    • Amy Hageman Wins SMPS Member of the Year
    • BIG RED DOG Celebrates our First 5 Years
    • Award Winning BIG RED Blog Award From www.civilengineeringschools.org

    Written by Will Schnier P.E.

    Will Schnier is the Chief Executive Officer of BIG RED DOG Engineering | Consulting. Will received his BSCE from Purdue University and co-founded BIG RED DOG Engineering and Consulting in 2009. Since starting the firm in 2009, BIG RED DOG has grown to over 100 team members with offices in Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio. BIG RED DOG has garnered awards for being one of the 50 fastest growing companies in Texas (Business Journal’s Fast 50 in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015) and an ENR top 100 Design Firm in Texas and Louisiana (2012, 2103, 2014, 2015). Mr. Schnier is very well versed in the project review and development permitting process having worked closely and very successfully with City and County review staff, neighborhood associations, environmental groups, and public boards and councils. He has been responsible for the project management, engineering design, and regulatory permitting of hundreds of single family subdivision projects, mixed use and multifamily residential developments, industrial facilities and oil and gas development projects throughout Texas. He is the author of two publications: “Land Subdivision – A Practical Guide for Central Texas” and “The Book on License Agreements in the City of Austin”. Will was appointed to the Board of Directors of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA) in 2014 and served as Mayor Lee Leffingwell’s appointment to the City of Austin Zoning Board of Adjustment from 2011 to 2015.



    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps: Starting a

    #dog walking business

    #

    How to start a dog walking business: 4 simple steps

    With recent figures showing that Brits spent more than £4bn on their beloved pets in 2015, you’d be barking mad to think the recession has impacted on the UK’s pet spend.

    Action point: Need a loan to start a business of your own? See how we can help here and here

    Marking a 10% increase on pooch spending from 2010, it’s not only large retailers benefitting, with many entrepreneurs realising there’s opportunities to be had in the pet industry.

    The average dog walker now earns 20% more than the average UK salary. so it’s clearly a viable and potentially profitable business opportunity.

    Of course you’ll need to have a genuine interest in dogs as well as a good knowledge of the various rules and regulations surrounding the industry – and it’s a fairly business marketplace.

    However, with plenty of doting pet owners out there, finding a good niche can still present great opportunities.

    Sound interesting? Then read our four simple steps to help you become top dog in the industry.

    1. Experience is essential

    While it’s not imperative to have a career background with animals, you should at least be confident around dogs and at the very least have experience in walking a family or friend’s pet.

    The Kennel Club’s guidelines for people working with dogs advises “strong interpersonal and communication skills”, as well as “a high level of fitness” and, naturally, “an affinity with, and understanding of dogs” for anyone wishing to pursue a career with man’s best friend.

    If you’re in need of experience in handling dogs, you might want to consider volunteering at your local kennels or rescue centre. They’ll often house a good range of dogs of various sizes, age and temperament, so you’ll be fit to face whatever comes your way.

    Consider attending courses in animal first aid, pet medication or even animal psychology as gaining a diploma or certificate in any of these would showcase your commitment to the dog’s welfare and impress clients.

    2. Remember, it’s a business

    While any animal lover might feel like they’ve died and gone to doggy heaven, remind yourself that your dog walking business is just that – a business. As such, you’ll need to possess all the regular entrepreneurial skills required for founding and running a successful company.

    Having a basic understanding of bookkeeping is important as you’ll need to be able to balance your own books and fill in your self-assessment tax return. Remember that this is your livelihood and not a hobby, your income should reflect this.

    Similarly, a good understanding of marketing and self-promotion will be needed to get your business off the ground.

    Finally, an ability to network and negotiate with both your customers and local animal industry is key. Never underestimate the potential for clients to try and negotiate price or you could find yourself working for substantially less than you might have hoped.

    3. Be aware of the rules and regulations

    Although there are relatively few regulations specifically targeted at dog walkers, businesses providing a service must get public liability insurance.

    If this is the start-up business idea for you, be aware you may have to deal with dogs injuring other dogs or people while in your charge.

    It’s vital to have the right insurance cover to deal with legal claims, should they arise.

    They can help provide you with support and advice on dog walkers insurance and training, plus your membership will give your clients confidence.

    To ensure you abide by key regulations, Narps suggest you should:

    • Meet owners prior to the first booking
    • Restrict the number of dogs walked to no more than four at a time
    • Keep records of all work undertaken
    • Protect clients’ personal information

    All dogs in public must wear a collar with the owners name and address on it and you could be fined up to £1,000 if you fail to clean up its faeces.

    While not the most exciting element of running your own business, it’s crucial you keep abreast of the latest rules and regulations to ensure you’re not jeopardising the safety of others or the reputation of your business.

    4. Find a niche in the market

    Given the popularity of setting up a dog walking business, it’s very probable you’ll have to find a niche to distinguish yourself from the crowd.

    Above all else, carry out market research and see if there’s actually room in your area for another dog walker.

    A simple google search or contacting NarpsUK will help a lot in this regard.

    Consider offering pet sitting as well as dog walking. Much like babysitting, you’ll mind your client’s pets at their home while they are away, as well as feeding them and attending to any medical needs such as medication or fulfilling dietary requirements.

    Having a diploma in pet medication would be advantageous in this instance as it would allow you to cater to a specific group of dogs.

    Provided you are properly trained, you could also offer grooming services such as hair cutting or washing.

    Offering one-to-one intense sessions with larger dogs could also widen your appeal.

    Some dogs simply won’t be satisfied by a trip around the block and will require a more strenuous workout.

    For more information on starting a dog walking business, take a look atour in-depth guide to help you prepare for the launch of your start-up.

    Comments

    Useful business start up tools

    Forum post of the week

    Want to run a more profitable business?

    More from Startups



    How to Become a Dog Walker – Wacky Hounds, brightening up your

    #dog walking business

    #

    How to start a dog walking business.

    Become a professional Dog Walker – The ultimate dog walking job – Dog walker opportunity

    This short guide has been written with a view to explaining what is required to start up a professional dog walking business. It should give you a good idea about what you need to consider in your pursuit of becoming a full time Dog Walker. This guide is designed to give you an idea as to what is involved in starting up a professional dog walking business to run on a commercial full time basis. There are many adverts out there offering “dog walking jobs” but there is no need to look for employment as a dog walker or indeed to apply for dog walking jobs, when you can run your very own successful dog walking business.

    There are many people, many dog loving people, who are in jobs that they dislike and would give their right arm for an opportunity to make a successful career in some form of dog care. Imagine keeping fit whilst being out in the fresh air and countryside. Could you think of a better way to make a living than keeping fit in the fresh air, whilst working with loads of different dogs every day? The list below will give you a good idea about how to become a self employed dog walker, so that you don’t have to apply for so called “dog walking jobs” or “dog walking opportunities”.

    When starting a dog walking/pet sitting business, there is a lot of things to take into consideration:

    Business Insurance – You will need quality business insurance which should include the likes of Public Liability, Care Custody & Control/Animal Liability, Professional Indemnity, Equipment Insurance, Personal Accident Cover, Vet Fees Extension, Loss of Key Cover, Glass Cover & Holiday Emergency Cover.

    A professionally equipped van – For the transportation of dogs, your van should be professionally kitted out in the inside, be fitted with a moisture extraction system and your livery should be undertaken by professional Sign Writers.

    Van Insurance – Suitable cover for a self-employed Dog Walker.

    Relevant Local Council Licences – Depending on your local authority, there may be a variety of licences which you must hold, if you wish to operate as a Dog Walker in your local parks or you plan to offer dog home boarding services.

    DBS/Disclosure Scotland – Undertake relevant police checks to inspire confidence in your future clients and to demonstrate trustworthiness.

    Website – A modern, vibrant website is a must to convey professionalism and to allow prospective clients to find you easily.

    Dog Walking/Boarding/Sitting – There is a variety of services that you can offer.

    Branding/Trademark – In order to distinguish yourself from your peers, a great deal of thought should go into your brand and the protection of it.

    Stationery – Your stationery should be consistent with your brand, and cover the likes of business cards, letterheads & envelopes.

    Marketing – It is important to keep your advertising costs to a minimum when starting up any business, yet vital to find clients. Keeping your overheads as low as possible yet effective is advised.

    Registration Forms – You will need an easily managed system to sign up new clients and will need well designed forms to cover the likes of Information Form, Terms and Conditions, Veterinary Authorisation, Walking Off the Lead and Customer Satisfaction Surveys.

    Cover Letters – Easily edited to cover a wide range of scenarios, to save on administration time.

    Charging Structure – The importance of this cannot be understated as there is a fine line between competitiveness and profitability.

    Uniform – In accordance with your brand, you must be seen to be smart and professional at all times.

    Key Management – It is extremely important that your key management systems are infallible.

    Rota Management – In order to run an efficient operation, good time-management is essential.

    Accounts – Not only is there a legal requirement for tax purposes, but tidy book keeping will save you a lot of time and expense.

    Filing – You should have a tidy and appropriate system in place that complies with all relevant data protection rules and regulations.

    Equipment – The types of equipment that you will need on a day to day business will include; Leads, Couplers, nail clippers, tick-removers, waterproof camera and phone, good boots and waterproof trousers and jacket.

    Branded Dog I.D tags – Essential that all of your dogs wear these on every walk.

    Training – It is not easy to take out a group of dogs for an hour’s walk. The practicalities of being a Dog Walker are far reaching, and you need to consider things like: basic group formation, collection of dogs, positioning of dogs in van, safe release of dogs from van, your walks, photo and video taking, using a dog whistle, potential hazards, safely getting your dogs back in the van and a suitable procedure for returning your dogs. With all of this in mind, you should undertake suitable before commencing with commercial dog walking.

    Clients – Last but not least, you need to build and look after your client bank.

    As you can see with this brief guide to becoming a dog walker, there is a lot of things to give consideration to. It may seem like a lot, but starting up a professional dog walking service requires a lot of planning.If, however, you would like the backing and help from an already successful and established dog walking company, then please take a look at our franchise page and download a free copy of our prospectus. Also, why not pop in to say hello to us on our facebook page, we won’t bite!

    Have a Wacky day!

    Join us at Wacky Hounds



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    Love Dogs Start a Dog Walking Business

    Everyone knows that dogs should be out walking just like us, dog owners today can lead extremely busy lives and due to busy schedules, physical disabilities or injuries, it may not be always possible for pet owners to walk their dogs themselves.

    This is where you, as the owner of your own Dog Walking Business can step in and help out. Grab the Free video guide to learn more about starting your own dog walking business.

    Ever thought about it? Doing something that you love, Walking 10-20 dogs a day at say $25 an hour, add a few add on services and you all of a sudden are making a great income running your own business without a whole lot of overheads. Understand that you will not need a significant investment to get started like other business models, No need to Build anything, carry large amounts of stock, pay rent etc. and you can do it all working out of your own home.

    DogWalkingBusiness.com.au has been set up to help you achieve just that in just a few days, not months. Our goal is to have you walking your 1st dog within a few days. To get you started quickly here is an outline of part of what we provide:

    • Professional looking search engine friendly website
    • A fully optimised Google AdWords account set up
    • Pamphlets customized for you and your area
    • Customised stationary, business cards logos
    • Ongoing online marketing advice

    Starting a dog walking business can end up earning you a very comfortable living while combining a love of animals and the outdoors. Getting started is relatively low cost and can be done in a few days. Go ahead and fill out your details to the right or give us a call on 1800 423 967 and we can have a friendly chat and answer questions a see what we can do to help you get started in your own business.