Tag : Environment?

Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future,

business environment

Gathering a body of global agreements

Business environment

Business environment

Business environment

Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future

Transmitted to the General Assembly as an Annex to document A/42/427 – Development and International Co-operation: Environment

Business environment

Business environment

Table of Contents

Acronyms and Note on Terminology

Chairman’s Foreword

From One Earth to One World

Part I. Common Concerns

  • A Threatened Future
  • Symptoms and Causes
  • New Approaches to Environment and Development
  • Towards Sustainable Development
  • The Concept of Sustainable Development
  • Equity and the Common Interest
  • Strategic Imperatives
  • Conclusion
  • The Role of the International Economy
  • The International Economy, the Environment, and Development
  • Decline in the 1980s
  • Enabling Sustainable Development
  • A Sustainable World Economy
  • Part II. Common Challenges

  • Population and Human Resources
  • The Links with Environment and Development
  • The Population Perspective
  • A Policy Framework
  • Food Security: Sustaining the Potential
  • Achievements
  • Signs of Crisis
  • The Challenge
  • Strategies for Sustainable Food Security
  • Food for the Future
  • Species and Ecosystems: Resources for Development
  • The Problem: Character and Extent
  • Extinction Patterns and Trends
  • Some Causes of Extinction
  • Economic Values at Stake
  • New Approach: Anticipate and Prevent
  • International Action for National Species
  • Scope for National Action
  • The Need for Action
  • Energy: Choices for Environment and Development
  • Energy, Economy, and Environment
  • Fossil Fuels: The Continuing Dilemma
  • Nuclear Energy: Unsolved Problems
  • Wood Fuels: The Vanishing Resource
  • Renewable Energy: The Untapped Potential
  • Energy Efficiency: Maintaining the Momentum
  • Energy Conservation Measures
  • Conclusion
  • Industry: Producing More With Less
  • Industrial Growth and its Impact
  • Sustainable Industrial Development in a Global Context
  • Strategies for Sustainable Industrial Development
  • The Urban Challenge
  • The Growth of Cities
  • The Urban Challenge in Developing Countries
  • International Cooperation
  • Part III. Common Endeavours

  • Managing The Commons
  • Oceans: The Balance of Life
  • Space: A Key to Planetary Management
  • Antarctica: Towards Global Cooperation
  • Peace, Security, Development, and the Environment
  • Environmental Stress as a Source of Conflict
  • Conflict as a Cause of Unsustainable Development
  • Towards Security and Sustainable Development
  • Towards Common Action: Proposals For Institutional and Legal Change
  • The Challenge for Institutional and Legal Change
  • Proposals for Institutional and Legal Change
  • A Call for Action
  • Annexes

    Annexe 1: Summary of Proposed Legal Principles for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development Adopted by the WCED Experts Group on Environmental Law

    Annexe 2: The Commission and its Work

    Throughout this report, quotes from some of the many people who spoke at WCED public hearings appear in boxes to illustrate the range of opinions the Commission was exposed to during its three years of work. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the Commission.

    Business environment

    Business environment

    Business environment

    and made possible through freely available information & communications technology.

    Business environment



    Apple failing to protect Chinese factory workers – BBC News, business environment.#Business

    Apple ‘failing to protect Chinese factory workers’

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    Poor treatment of workers in Chinese factories which make Apple products has been discovered by an undercover BBC Panorama investigation.

    Filming on an iPhone 6 production line showed Apple’s promises to protect workers were routinely broken.

    It found standards on workers’ hours, ID cards, dormitories, work meetings and juvenile workers were being breached at the Pegatron factories.

    Apple said it strongly disagreed with the programme’s conclusions.

    Exhausted workers were filmed falling asleep on their 12-hour shifts at the Pegatron factories on the outskirts of Shanghai.

    One undercover reporter, working in a factory making parts for Apple computers, had to work 18 days in a row despite repeated requests for a day off.

    Another reporter, whose longest shift was 16 hours, said: “Every time I got back to the dormitories, I wouldn’t want to move.

    “Even if I was hungry I wouldn’t want to get up to eat. I just wanted to lie down and rest. I was unable to sleep at night because of the stress.”

    ‘Continuous improvement’

    Apple declined to be interviewed for the programme, but said in a statement: “We are aware of no other company doing as much as Apple to ensure fair and safe working conditions.

    “We work with suppliers to address shortfalls, and we see continuous and significant improvement, but we know our work is never done.”

    Apple said it was a very common practice for workers to nap during breaks, but it would investigate any evidence they were falling asleep while working.

    It said it monitored the working hours of more than a million workers and that staff at Pegatron were averaging 55 hours a week.

    Find out more

    Watch Panorama: Apple’s Broken Promises on BBC One on 18 December at 21:00 GMT or later on the BBC iPlayer.

    The poor conditions in Chinese factories were highlighted in 2010 when 14 workers killed themselves at Apple’s biggest supplier, Foxconn.

    Following the suicides, Apple published a set of standards spelling out how factory workers should be treated. It also moved some of its production work to Pegatron’s factories on the outskirts of Shanghai.

    But Panorama’s undercover reporters found that these standards were routinely breached on the factory floor.

    Overtime is supposed to be voluntary, but none of the reporters were offered any choice. In addition to the excessive hours, one reporter had to attend unpaid meetings before and after work. Another reporter was housed in a dormitory where 12 workers shared a cramped room.

    Apple says the dormitory overcrowding has now been resolved and that it requires suppliers to retroactively pay workers if it finds they haven’t been paid for work meetings.

    Pegatron said it was carefully investigating Panorama’s claims and would take all necessary action if any deficiencies were found at their facilities.

    “Worker safety and well-being are our top priorities. We set very high standards, conduct rigorous training for managers and workers, and have external auditors regularly visiting our facilities to find areas for improvement,” a statement said.

    Dangerous conditions

    Panorama also travelled further down Apple’s supply chain to the Indonesian island of Bangka.

    Apple says it is dedicated to the ethical sourcing of minerals, but the programme found evidence that tin from illegal mines could be entering its supply chain.

    It found children digging tin ore out by hand in extremely dangerous conditions – miners can be buried alive when the walls of sand or mud collapse.

    Twelve-year-old Rianto was working with his dad at the bottom of a 70-foot cliff of sand. He said: “I worry about landslides. The earth slipping from up there to the bottom. It could happen.”

    Panorama tracked down a gang who collect tin from the area where Rianto was working. One of them said they sold tin to a smelter on Apple’s list of suppliers.

    Johan Murod, who runs one of the smelters on Apple’s list, said 70% of the tin that is exported comes from the small-scale mines.

    “At the smelter there’s everything from both large and small scale mines. It’s all mixed. There’s no way to know what is legal and what is illegal.”

    Apple says it is a complex situation on Bangka with tens of thousands of miners selling tin through many middle men.

    “The simplest course of action would be for Apple to unilaterally refuse any tin from Indonesian mines. That would be easy for us to do and would certainly shield us from criticism.

    “But that would also be the lazy and cowardly path, since it would do nothing to improve the situation. We have chosen to stay engaged and attempt to drive changes on the ground.”

    Watch Panorama: Apple’s Broken Promises on BBC One on 18 December at 21:00 GMT or watch later on BBC iPlayer.



    Business and finance news from Guardian US, The Guardian, business environment.#Business #environment


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    Business environment

    Mark Zuckerberg says extent of opioid crisis was biggest surprise of US tour

    Business environment

    Monocle: you’ve seen the magazine – now buy the apartment

    Business environment

    Ex-Facebook president Sean Parker: site made to exploit human ‘vulnerability’

    Uber loses landmark ruling in UK employment rights case

    Are the Murdochs at war over the future of their media empire?

    ‘Some kids are not orphans because of this’: how unions are keeping workers safe

    Bids are in for Amazon’s HQ2. Now the contest begins – but will it be worth it?

    From Harvey Weinstein to Shakira, the celebrities with offshore interests

    The seven Republican super-donors who keep money in tax havens

    The wealthy men in Trump’s inner circle with links to tax havens

    Trump commerce secretary’s business links with Putin family laid out in leaked files

    Coal-fired plant shifted $1bn offshore while pocketing $117m from Australian taxpayers

    Ferrari on course for €1bn annual profit as supercar demand rises

    Australian stock market sustains highest point since global financial crisis

    Fox News shows broke UK TV impartiality rules, Ofcom finds

    More around the world

    Generation rent: why I’ll never live in a penthouse free of mice

    The desperate inequality behind global tax dodging

    ‘I heard the N-word in a board meeting’: readers on race and power in the UK

    How can companies cut the UK’s class pay gap?

    ‘Nice skirt, it would look better on my bedroom floor’ – your sexual harassment stories



    Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future,

    business environment

    Gathering a body of global agreements

    Business environment

    Business environment

    Business environment

    Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future

    Transmitted to the General Assembly as an Annex to document A/42/427 – Development and International Co-operation: Environment

    Business environment

    Business environment

    Table of Contents

    Acronyms and Note on Terminology

    Chairman’s Foreword

    From One Earth to One World

    Part I. Common Concerns

  • A Threatened Future
  • Symptoms and Causes
  • New Approaches to Environment and Development
  • Towards Sustainable Development
  • The Concept of Sustainable Development
  • Equity and the Common Interest
  • Strategic Imperatives
  • Conclusion
  • The Role of the International Economy
  • The International Economy, the Environment, and Development
  • Decline in the 1980s
  • Enabling Sustainable Development
  • A Sustainable World Economy
  • Part II. Common Challenges

  • Population and Human Resources
  • The Links with Environment and Development
  • The Population Perspective
  • A Policy Framework
  • Food Security: Sustaining the Potential
  • Achievements
  • Signs of Crisis
  • The Challenge
  • Strategies for Sustainable Food Security
  • Food for the Future
  • Species and Ecosystems: Resources for Development
  • The Problem: Character and Extent
  • Extinction Patterns and Trends
  • Some Causes of Extinction
  • Economic Values at Stake
  • New Approach: Anticipate and Prevent
  • International Action for National Species
  • Scope for National Action
  • The Need for Action
  • Energy: Choices for Environment and Development
  • Energy, Economy, and Environment
  • Fossil Fuels: The Continuing Dilemma
  • Nuclear Energy: Unsolved Problems
  • Wood Fuels: The Vanishing Resource
  • Renewable Energy: The Untapped Potential
  • Energy Efficiency: Maintaining the Momentum
  • Energy Conservation Measures
  • Conclusion
  • Industry: Producing More With Less
  • Industrial Growth and its Impact
  • Sustainable Industrial Development in a Global Context
  • Strategies for Sustainable Industrial Development
  • The Urban Challenge
  • The Growth of Cities
  • The Urban Challenge in Developing Countries
  • International Cooperation
  • Part III. Common Endeavours

  • Managing The Commons
  • Oceans: The Balance of Life
  • Space: A Key to Planetary Management
  • Antarctica: Towards Global Cooperation
  • Peace, Security, Development, and the Environment
  • Environmental Stress as a Source of Conflict
  • Conflict as a Cause of Unsustainable Development
  • Towards Security and Sustainable Development
  • Towards Common Action: Proposals For Institutional and Legal Change
  • The Challenge for Institutional and Legal Change
  • Proposals for Institutional and Legal Change
  • A Call for Action
  • Annexes

    Annexe 1: Summary of Proposed Legal Principles for Environmental Protection and Sustainable Development Adopted by the WCED Experts Group on Environmental Law

    Annexe 2: The Commission and its Work

    Throughout this report, quotes from some of the many people who spoke at WCED public hearings appear in boxes to illustrate the range of opinions the Commission was exposed to during its three years of work. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the Commission.

    Business environment

    Business environment

    Business environment

    and made possible through freely available information & communications technology.

    Business environment



    Houston Business and Finance News, Houston Chronicle – Houston Chronicle, business environment.#Business

    Business

    Retail wrap: Shopping center in Montgomery has new owner
    Business calendar
    As oil prices Rise, majors eye Mexico’s deep waters
    ‘Nervous’ Mideast pushes oil to longest winning streak in a year

    Fuel Fix

    • Business environment

    Two oil executives plead guilty in foreign bribery case

    Two oil executives plead guilty in foreign bribery case

  • Business environment

    FERC chairman says Perry’s grid proposal to be decided by Dec. 11

    FERC chairman says Perry’s grid proposal to be decided by Dec. 11

  • Business environment

    Total buys Engie’s LNG business, including Cameron LNG stake

    Total buys Engie’s LNG business, including Cameron LNG stake

    Business Galleries

    • Business environment

    Brands millennials love

  • Business environment

    Gallery: Data reveals where Houston sends its goods the most

  • Business environment

    Passengers denied boarding by US airlines in 2017

  • Business environment

    Gallery: America’s best and worst airlines to be on time

    World Business News

    US cities, states defy Trump, still back Paris climate deal
    Mattel stock soars on report of Hasbro takeover offer
    UK panel rules Uber drivers have rights on wages, time off
    Data firm CEO: Reached out to WikiLeaks about Clinton emails
    Equifax apologizes again, lays out costs going forward
    Business Highlights
    US stocks on two-day losing streak as health stocks fall
    How major US stock indexes fared on Friday
    Baxter and Equifax while Disney and JC Penney climb
    Markets Right Now: Eight-week streak ends as stocks slip

    Business Insider

    McCain blasts Trump: ‘There’s nothing “America First”‘ about.
    When Jerry Jones bought the Dallas Cowboys they were losing $1.
    Netflix is sliding after Disney outlines its plan to overthrow.
    11 amazing perks Mark Zuckerberg offers employees at Facebook.
    26 powerful men accused of sexual misconduct in the wake of.
    The 19 hottest San Francisco startups to watch in 2018
    TripAdvisor has unveiled a new badge that warns users about.
    Elon Musk wants to live on Mars, but this planetary scientist.
    Disney tried to hide the Millennium Falcon with shipping.
    How your tax bracket could change under Trump’s tax plan, in.

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  • What Is Business Environment? Definition & Factors – Video & Lesson Transcript

    #business environment

    #

    What Is Business Environment? – Definition & Factors

    Businesses do not operate in a vacuum; they operate in an environment. In this lesson, you’ll learn about the business environment, including what makes it up. A short quiz follows the lesson.

    Business Environment Defined

    Business environment is the sum total of all external and internal factors that influence a business. You should keep in mind that external factors and internal factors can influence each other and work together to affect a business. For example, a health and safety regulation is an external factor that influences the internal environment of business operations. Additionally, some external factors are beyond your control. These factors are often called external constraints. Let’s take a look at some key environmental factors.

    External Factors

    Political factors are governmental activities and political conditions that may affect your business. Examples include laws, regulations, tariffs and other trade barriers, war, and social unrest.

    Macroeconomic factors are factors that affect the entire economy, not just your business. Examples include things like interest rates, unemployment rates, currency exchange rates, consumer confidence, consumer discretionary income, consumer savings rates, recessions, and depressions.

    Microeconomic factors are factors that can affect your business, such as market size, demand, supply, relationships with suppliers and your distribution chain, such as retail stores that sell your products, and the number and strength of your competition.

    Social factors are basically sociological factors related to general society and social relations that affect your business. Social factors include social movements, such as environmental movements, as well as changes in fashion and consumer preferences. For example, clothing fashions change with the season, and there is a current trend towards green construction and organic foods.

    Technological factors are technological innovations that can either benefit or hurt your business. Some technological innovations can increase your productivity and profit margins, such as computer software and automated production. On the other hand, some technological innovations pose an existential threat to a business, such as Internet streaming challenging the DVD rental business.

    Internal Factors

    Organizational culture is the framework of values, vision, norms, and customs shared by the members of an organization. Your business culture affects how the employees in your business interact with each other, its customers, and other stakeholders.

    Unlock Content

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    Get FREE access for 5 days,
    just create an account.

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    Organizational structure is the manner in which the business is organized to conduct its activities. Organizations can be organized fairly flat, with very few levels of hierarchy, or organized very vertical, with many levels of hierarchy. The manner in which an organization is structured will affect how your business is managed and how much control individual employees have over their work.

    Management structure is the manner in which your business is managed. Management may be centralized, where all decision-making is made at the top and filtered down throughout the business, or it may be decentralized, where the decision-making is distributed throughout the organization and decisions are made closer to the relevant work activities or problems.

    Lesson Summary

    Business environment includes the external and internal factors that influence a business. External factors include political factors, macroeconomic factors, microeconomic factors, social factors, and technological factors. Internal factors are factors from inside the organization that affect a business, such as organizational culture, organizational structure, and management structure.

    To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
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    What Is Business Environment? Definition & Factors – Video & Lesson Transcript

    #business environment

    #

    What Is Business Environment? – Definition & Factors

    Businesses do not operate in a vacuum; they operate in an environment. In this lesson, you’ll learn about the business environment, including what makes it up. A short quiz follows the lesson.

    Business Environment Defined

    Business environment is the sum total of all external and internal factors that influence a business. You should keep in mind that external factors and internal factors can influence each other and work together to affect a business. For example, a health and safety regulation is an external factor that influences the internal environment of business operations. Additionally, some external factors are beyond your control. These factors are often called external constraints. Let’s take a look at some key environmental factors.

    External Factors

    Political factors are governmental activities and political conditions that may affect your business. Examples include laws, regulations, tariffs and other trade barriers, war, and social unrest.

    Macroeconomic factors are factors that affect the entire economy, not just your business. Examples include things like interest rates, unemployment rates, currency exchange rates, consumer confidence, consumer discretionary income, consumer savings rates, recessions, and depressions.

    Microeconomic factors are factors that can affect your business, such as market size, demand, supply, relationships with suppliers and your distribution chain, such as retail stores that sell your products, and the number and strength of your competition.

    Social factors are basically sociological factors related to general society and social relations that affect your business. Social factors include social movements, such as environmental movements, as well as changes in fashion and consumer preferences. For example, clothing fashions change with the season, and there is a current trend towards green construction and organic foods.

    Technological factors are technological innovations that can either benefit or hurt your business. Some technological innovations can increase your productivity and profit margins, such as computer software and automated production. On the other hand, some technological innovations pose an existential threat to a business, such as Internet streaming challenging the DVD rental business.

    Internal Factors

    Organizational culture is the framework of values, vision, norms, and customs shared by the members of an organization. Your business culture affects how the employees in your business interact with each other, its customers, and other stakeholders.

    Unlock Content

    Over 30,000 lessons in all major subjects

    Get FREE access for 5 days,
    just create an account.

    No obligation, cancel anytime.

    Select a subject to preview related courses:

    Organizational structure is the manner in which the business is organized to conduct its activities. Organizations can be organized fairly flat, with very few levels of hierarchy, or organized very vertical, with many levels of hierarchy. The manner in which an organization is structured will affect how your business is managed and how much control individual employees have over their work.

    Management structure is the manner in which your business is managed. Management may be centralized, where all decision-making is made at the top and filtered down throughout the business, or it may be decentralized, where the decision-making is distributed throughout the organization and decisions are made closer to the relevant work activities or problems.

    Lesson Summary

    Business environment includes the external and internal factors that influence a business. External factors include political factors, macroeconomic factors, microeconomic factors, social factors, and technological factors. Internal factors are factors from inside the organization that affect a business, such as organizational culture, organizational structure, and management structure.

    To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
    Create your account

    Earning College Credit

    Did you know We have over 49 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 2,000 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

    Transferring credit to the school of your choice

    Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that’s right for you.

    Research Schools, Degrees Careers

    Get the unbiased info you need to find the right school.

    Browse Articles By Category


    Business environment – это #cheap #business #ideas


    #business environment

    #

    business environment это:

    эк. . упр. условия [внешняя среда\] бизнеса, бизнес-среда, деловая среда (любые внешние по отношению к фирме факторы, прямо или косвенно влияющие на ее деятельность, напр. предложение сырья, спрос на продукцию, налоговое законодательство и т. п.; термин используется часто как синоним macroenvironment, хотя business environment имеет более широкое значение )

    * * *
    условия бизнеса, деловое окружение: любые факторы, которые прямо или косвенно сказываются на бизнесе.

    экономические условия; условия хозяйствования; деловая практика; состояние деловой активности! Условия для предпринимательской деятельности; конъюнктура; состояние рынка

    Словарь экономических терминов.

    Англо-русский экономический словарь .

    Смотреть что такое “business environment” в других словарях:

    Business environment — An environment can be defined as anything which surrounds a system. Therefore, the business environment is anything which surrounds the business organisation. It affects the decisions, strategies, processes and performance of the business. The … Wikipedia

    business environment — /ˌbɪznɪs ɪn vaɪrənmənt/ noun the elements or factors outside a business organisation which directly affect it, such as the supply of raw materials and product demand ● The unreliability of supplies is one of the worst features of our business … Marketing dictionary in english

    Ministry of Economy, Commerce and Business Environment (Romania) — Ministry of Economy, Commerce and Business Environment Coat of arms of Romania First: Formation … Wikipedia

    Ministry of Small and Medium Enterprises, Commerce and Business Environment (Romania) — Ministry of Small and Medium Enterprises, Commerce and Business Environment [[File:|]] First: Ovidiu Ioan Silaghi Formation: April 2007 style= bgcolor= #efefef Website … Wikipedia

    Business ecology — Business Ecology: Moving beyond Ecology As a Metaphor Current Definitions of Business Ecology The use of the term “business ecology” is not new. Yet, previous conceptualizations of the term have not yielded a meaning that sufficiently represents … Wikipedia

    environment — en‧vi‧ron‧ment [ɪnˈvaɪərənmənt ǁ ˈvaɪr ] noun [countable] 1. the environment the air, water, and land in which people, animals, and plants live: • Since these chemicals were banned, pesticide levels in the environment have been declining. 2. the … Financial and business terms

    Business continuity — is the activity performed by an organization to ensure that critical business functions will be available to customers, suppliers, regulators, and other entities that must have access to those functions. These activities include many daily chores … Wikipedia

    Business process reengineering — (BPR) is a management approach aiming at improvements by means of elevating efficiency and effectiveness of the processes that exist within and across organizations. The key to BPR is for organizations to look at their business processes from a … Wikipedia

    Business New Zealand — Business NZ is New Zealand’s largest business advocacy body, headquartered in Wellington, New Zealand. The president of the Business NZ council is Stephen Collins and Phil O Reilly is the chief executive. Membership Membership is drawn from four … Wikipedia

    Business agility — the ability of a business to adapt rapidly and cost efficiently in response to changes in the business environment. Business agility can be maintained by maintaining and adapting goods and services to meet customer demands, adjusting to the … Wikipedia

    Книги

    • The International Business Environment. Hamilton Leslie. Building on the success of the first edition, this text employs a wide range of examples from BRIC and CIVETS economies and provides chapters on CSR and the ecological environment. For this Подробнее Купить за 4026 руб
    • Business Options. Teacher’s Book. Watson Anne. Business Options completes Oxford’s series of business English courses and is suitable for professional people from all areas of business, particularly those functioning in an international Подробнее Купить за 2226 руб
    • Business Basics: Student’s Book. David Grant, Robert McLarty. Business Basics is a complete first course in English for business, providing a systematic and thorough coverage of basic language structures and skills, through the medium of interesting and Подробнее Купить за 2186 руб

    Другие книги по запросу business environment >>



    What Is Business Environment? Definition & Factors – Video & Lesson Transcript

    #business environment

    #

    What Is Business Environment? – Definition & Factors

    Businesses do not operate in a vacuum; they operate in an environment. In this lesson, you’ll learn about the business environment, including what makes it up. A short quiz follows the lesson.

    Business Environment Defined

    Business environment is the sum total of all external and internal factors that influence a business. You should keep in mind that external factors and internal factors can influence each other and work together to affect a business. For example, a health and safety regulation is an external factor that influences the internal environment of business operations. Additionally, some external factors are beyond your control. These factors are often called external constraints. Let’s take a look at some key environmental factors.

    External Factors

    Political factors are governmental activities and political conditions that may affect your business. Examples include laws, regulations, tariffs and other trade barriers, war, and social unrest.

    Macroeconomic factors are factors that affect the entire economy, not just your business. Examples include things like interest rates, unemployment rates, currency exchange rates, consumer confidence, consumer discretionary income, consumer savings rates, recessions, and depressions.

    Microeconomic factors are factors that can affect your business, such as market size, demand, supply, relationships with suppliers and your distribution chain, such as retail stores that sell your products, and the number and strength of your competition.

    Social factors are basically sociological factors related to general society and social relations that affect your business. Social factors include social movements, such as environmental movements, as well as changes in fashion and consumer preferences. For example, clothing fashions change with the season, and there is a current trend towards green construction and organic foods.

    Technological factors are technological innovations that can either benefit or hurt your business. Some technological innovations can increase your productivity and profit margins, such as computer software and automated production. On the other hand, some technological innovations pose an existential threat to a business, such as Internet streaming challenging the DVD rental business.

    Internal Factors

    Organizational culture is the framework of values, vision, norms, and customs shared by the members of an organization. Your business culture affects how the employees in your business interact with each other, its customers, and other stakeholders.

    Unlock Content

    Over 30,000 lessons in all major subjects

    Get FREE access for 5 days,
    just create an account.

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    Organizational structure is the manner in which the business is organized to conduct its activities. Organizations can be organized fairly flat, with very few levels of hierarchy, or organized very vertical, with many levels of hierarchy. The manner in which an organization is structured will affect how your business is managed and how much control individual employees have over their work.

    Management structure is the manner in which your business is managed. Management may be centralized, where all decision-making is made at the top and filtered down throughout the business, or it may be decentralized, where the decision-making is distributed throughout the organization and decisions are made closer to the relevant work activities or problems.

    Lesson Summary

    Business environment includes the external and internal factors that influence a business. External factors include political factors, macroeconomic factors, microeconomic factors, social factors, and technological factors. Internal factors are factors from inside the organization that affect a business, such as organizational culture, organizational structure, and management structure.

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    NSW Business Environment – Business & Industry in New South Wales #small

    #business environment

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    Business & Industry in New South Wales

    NSW Business Environment

    Larger than Singapore, Malaysia and even Hong Kong, the NSW economy is a smart, progressive, competitive economic powerhouse on the doorstep of Asia in one of the most stable political and regulatory regions of the world.

    The growth state

    With world-leading infrastructure, cost-competitiveness, diversity of sectors and skills and government support, NSW has enjoyed a staggering 23 years of uninterrupted economic growth, which has been recognised with AAA sovereign credit ratings from both Standard Poor’s and Moody’s.

    Financial and banking sector

    The financial and banking services sector is the largest contributor to the state’s economy and increasing numbers of large multinationals are taking advantage of the positive economic environment to relocate their regional headquarters to Sydney.

    Manufacturing, mining and agribusiness

    Traditional manufacturing, mining and agribusiness sectors have also laid a solid foundation for diversification into high-growth areas such as aquaculture, biotechnology and information and communications technology. In fact, NSW is fast becoming a major regional hub for the ICT sector. It is this mixture of the old and the new which gives the state’s economy its vibrancy and progressiveness.

    Page link: http://www.industry.nsw.gov.au/business-and-industry-in-nsw/nsw-business-environment

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