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Capital One Spark Cash Review #business #courses


#business credit cards

#

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Nerdwallet Review

If your business needs a straightforward cash rewards credit card, the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is a solid option. It offers 2% back on all of your purchases and there’s no annual spending cap. There’s also a signup bonus: Earn a one-time $500 cash bonus once you spend $4,500 on purchases within the first 3 months.

The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business has an annual fee of $0 intro for first year; $59 after that, and no foreign transaction fees. There are business cards without annual fees, but this isn’t a bad fee — you can make it up by spending just $2,950 a year. The Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business is ideal for businesses that don’t require frequent travel, and for spending that is high and/or varies throughout the year.

Want to learn more about the Capital One® Spark® Cash for Business? See our full review of all the Spark cards for additional information.

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Harvard Business Law Review (HBLR) – The Harvard Business Law Review (HBLR)

#harvard business journal

#

This Article addresses mutual fund governance, explaining how it has recently become entangled with the norms and rules of corporate governance. At one level, it is understandable that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and courts have viewed mutual funds as a type of ordinary corporation. Both mutual funds and corporations are separate legal entities, having directors and shareholders. Directors of each are held to fiduciary duties, charged with serving shareholders’ interests, and expected to aspire to best practices. However, there are fundamental differences between mutual funds and ordinary corporations. This Article contends that these differences have important implications for governance, differences that should lead to the disentanglement of mutual fund governance from corporate governance.

We examine firm lifecycles of 3,081 IPOs from 1996–2012. We find that small IPOs have a different lifecycle than other, larger companies. Within five years of an IPO, only 55% of small capitalization companies remain listed on a public exchange, compared to 61% and 67% for middle and large capitalization companies, respectively. We examine various theories explaining the decline of the small IPO. We find only minor evidence that regulatory changes caused the decline of the small IPO. The decline appears instead to be more attributable to the historical unsuitability of small firms for the public market. Absent economic or market reforms that change small firm quality, further regulatory reforms to enhance the small IPO market are thus unlikely to be effective or bring firms into the public market that have the horsepower to remain publicly listed.

In Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Congress instructed the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to draft rules that would require public companies to report annually on whether their products contain certain Congolese minerals. This unprecedented legislation and the SEC rulemaking that followed have inspired an impassioned and ongoing debate between those who view these efforts as a costly misstep and those who view them as a measured response to human rights abuses committed by the armed groups that control many mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This Article for the first time brings empirical evidence to bear on this controversy.

In 2008, the Securities and Exchange Commission made waves by deciding to regulate the nascent peer-to-peer lending industry. Only two lending platforms survived the SEC’s entry into a previously lightly-regulated market. Under this regulatory setup, the SEC would regulate the lending-investing process, while other agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Federal Trade Commission would regulate the borrower side of the business. This Article argues that the existing bifurcated system works and is continually getting better as the SEC amends existing exemptions and introduces new regulations to smooth the path for financial innovation.

Since 1977, with the enactment of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the United States Department of Justice has played a leading role in applying the Act’s anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions in enforcement proceedings against numerous companies and individuals worldwide. In November 2015, the Department of Justice took the unprecedented step of hiring a Compliance Counsel to guide its prosecutors in decision-making in corporate prosecutions and in benchmarking corporate compliance. This Memorandum is composed as an open letter to the Compliance Counsel, focusing on how she and the Department of Justice should go about that critical benchmarking function.

Eric J. Chang’s provocative article, www.PayDayLoans.gov: A Solution for Restoring Price-Competition to Short-Term Credit Loans—which, as its title suggests, proposes to facilitate price competition in the payday lending market by creating a federal online exchange for payday lenders to post lending rates—has sparked thoughtful reactions among consumer borrowing experts. This Response provides constructive criticism to Chang’s proposal, arguing that such an exchange is unlikely to meet its goal of restoring price competition and offering tweaks that would raise the likelihood of doing so.



Dell XPS 8900 Review 2016 #business #loan #rate


#business computers

#

Dell XPS 8900 Review

PROS / It comes with 16GB of memory.

CONS / Without an upgrade, the warranty is only one year.

VERDICT / The Dell XPS 8900 is the best business computer because the quad-core processor, dedicated graphics card, and 16GB of memory provide the best overall performance for your business.

With a quad-core Intel i7-6700 processor, the Dell XPS 8900 has the best-performing processor in our review. While most business desktop computers have 8GB of memory, the Dell XPS provides 16GB of installed memory. In addition, it comes with a Nvidia GeForce GTX 745 graphics card that has 4GB of RAM for processing graphics. For these reasons, the Dell XPS 8900 earns the Top Ten Reviews Gold Award for the best business computer .

To find the best business computer, we looked at performance, memory and storage, connectivity, expansion potential, and support features. The most important feature is performance, which was evaluated by looking at the processor’s PassMark score – an industry benchmarking score that reflects the results of thousands of user testing. The Dell XPS’ processor had the highest PassMark score, which when combined with twice as much RAM as any computer, easily makes it the best business computer in the $1,000 price range.

8011.40 PassMark Score

Performance

The Dell XPS 8900 series of business computers has one of the best processors available, the Intel Core i7-6700 3.3-GHz processor. This processor has four cores. With hyper-threading, this processor has eight total threads of execution, which means that it’s almost like having eight cores. The difference between a quad-core processor with hyper-threading and one without is like the difference between an eight-lane highway versus a four-lane highway more data can pass through it. This is why the i7-6700 has a PassMark score of 11,000, which is the highest in our review. It’s easily capable of multitasking without experiencing a dip in performance.

Another great performance feature is the Nvidia GeForce GTX 745 graphics card. This GPU has 4GB of memory dedicated to processing graphics. This makes the XPS 8900 a great office PC for video and graphics editing, because the graphics have their own dedicated processor and RAM.

Since the GPU processes the graphics, the CPU is free to handle all the other data processing. This provides better performance all around. Most business computers rely on the processor to execute the graphics with integrated graphics, which can limit your multitasking abilities, because graphics can hog all the processor’s resources.

Memory & Storage

The XPS 8900 comes with 16GB of installed memory, which is double what the standard is for most business computers in the same price range. You can upgrade to as much as 32GB of RAM, and the motherboard can support up to 64GB. Even the least expensive computer in the XPS 8900 series has 8GB of RAM. With so much RAM, you can run the most data-intensive programs with ease, and you have a sufficient ceiling for years to come as apps increase their memory requirements.

You get a 1-TB hard drive, but you can upgrade to 2TB. For comparison, most business PCs come with a 500-GB or 1-TB hard drive. This gives you plenty of room to store all of your business’ important files. Dell also includes a one-year subscription to a Dropbox account so you can back up your critical files and easily share files with your employees and clients.

Connectivity

The XPS tower chassis has 10 USB ports six USB 3.0 and four USB 2.0. This gives you ample room to add external components and devices like microphones, scanners, cameras and external hard drives. However, this is on the low end. Some computers have as many as 14 USB ports. As a rule, you should have at least two or three more ports than you expect to use. It also comes with a 19-in-1 media card reader, which allows you to read a wide variety of portable storage cards.

This is one of the few business computers in our review with an HDMI port, which is the ideal port for high-definition displays and other media connections. While it also comes with the standard DisplayPort connection, the HDMI connection allows you to connect to a high-definition TV.

Expansion Potential

The most important expansion feature of the tower chassis is the 460-watt power supply unit, which is among the best available for a business computer. This is important because you need a substantial power supply if you want to add more components. An underpowered component can cause the computer to overheat, which can damage parts and become a fire hazard.

In addition, the motherboard has four expansion slots and five bays for adding more components, like secondary hard drives or an upgraded sound card. This gives you a lot of flexibility to customize the computer to your business’ needs.

Help & Support

A minor downside to the Dell XPS 8900 is the one-year warranty. The industry standard is three years. However, you have the option to upgrade to a two-, three- or four-year warranty. Each warranty includes onsite service and remote diagnosis, which allows you to diagnose issues using tools from the Dell website. As an upgrade, you can also protect it against accidental damage from liquid spills, drops and electrical surges.

Dell provides 24/7 support every day of the year via phone, live chat and email. This is critical for a business, because it means you can always receive help if your computer goes down. You can also consult community forums to share ideas and concerns with other users. In case the hard drive fails, Dell has an asset-recovery service to help you get back all of the important files for your business.

Summary

The Dell XPS 8900 is the best business computer. It combines 1TB of storage with the most memory and the best processor. It also features a 4GB graphics processor and an HDMI port. Despite the short one-year warranty, it provides the most reliable performance for a business computer at this price range.



Harvard Business Review France #quality #business #cards


#harvard business

#Pour inventer le futur, nous avons besoin de bien plus que de grandes idées, de mots incisifs, ou d’une vision particulièrement claire de l’avenir. Aussi étrange que cela puisse paraître pour débattre de questions d’innovation et de management, cela me fait penser à une expérimentation sociologique élaborée dans les années [ ] Lire la suite.


  • Googler, ubériser, twitter, shazammer… Le « brandverbing » semble être la nouvelle panacée marketing. Bien que l’on puisse observer depuis l’après-guerre de nombreux phénomènes de récupération de noms de marques pour en faire des noms communs (un Bic, un Kleenex, le Ping Pong, etc.), la réutilisation des noms de marques dans le [ ] Lire la suite.

  • Maturité, expérience, mobilité… Les atouts des « seniors » sont bien plus nombreux que certains semblent le penser. « Au secours, je viens d’avoir 50 ans. » Si vous avez-vous-même plus de 50 ans, vous avez certainement entendu cette plainte, ou vous avez en tout cas secrètement pensé… à 50 ans, c’est [ ] Lire la suite.
  • Malgré les incitations législatives, la part des femmes dans les plus hautes sphères de l entreprise reste encore réduite. Les sociétés du SBF120 montrent l exemple, mais il faut poursuivre les efforts. D autant que les directions ont tout à gagner à compter plus de femmes. Alors que le Haut conseil à l’égalité [ ] Lire la suite.

  • Pour marquer l esprit de vos auditeurs, la métaphore est un outil redoutable. Mais attention de ne pas tomber dans les clichés Lorsque nous essayons de persuader les gens de penser et d’agir différemment, nous étudions leurs désirs et leurs besoins, ce qui compte à leurs yeux, ce qui les empêche [ ]

    Parce que les consommateurs sont submergés d informations, il faut leur laisser moins de choix. Médias, publicité, social media, influence, réseau, envie, besoin… Selon nous, nos choix nous sont propres, mais est-ce vraiment le cas. De nombreux chercheurs dans le monde se sont évertués à étudier et comprendre comment se comportent [ ]

    Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Snapchat… Aujourd’hui, la publicité est loin d’être le seul moyen de communiquer avec ses clients. Mais pour profiter de cette transition numérique, mieux vaut définir une véritable ligne éditoriale. Avec l’arrivée de Facebook, les entreprises sont rentrées en conversation. Elles vivent dans une agora perpétuelle. A tout [ ]

    Du vendeur beau parleur à celui qui doit désormais challenger le client et lui proposer une expérience différente, quasi unique Nul doute que la fonction de commercial a profondément évolué au cours des dernières décennies. Décryptage et voyage dans le temps. C est un fait, les directeurs commerciaux ont beaucoup de [ ]

    On ne choisit pas son emploi comme une paire de baskets. C’est pourtant ce que les « marques employeurs » voudraient bien vous faire croire. La « marque employeur » est devenue l’une des priorités récurrentes des DRH et une ligne de dépense conséquente pour les entreprises (lire aussi la chronique Et si les [ ]

    Être parachuté nouveau chef d une équipe existante n est pas une mince affaire. Alors pour éviter les faux pas, suivez le guide. A cinq reprises au cours de ma carrière, j ai été nommée à la tête d’une équipe. La première fois, c’était chez Google où j étais l’une des co-équipières d un groupe de leaders. [ ]

    Les secteurs industriels traditionnels sont l’un des derniers bastions encore assez peu bouleversés par la transition numérique qui s’opère dans le monde des affaires. Mais cela pourrait bien être amené à changer d’ici peu. En 2003, en lançant l’iTunes Music Store, Apple s’apprêtait sans le savoir à établir un cas d’école [ ]

    Le véritable leader est celui qui sait faire grandir ses collaborateurs. Or, pour cela, il faut leur confier des responsabilités, parfois même en dehors de leur périmètre direct. Autrement dit, il faut savoir déléguer. Quel que soit votre niveau de responsabilité, on vous dira que, en tant que manager, vous [ ]

    Harvard Business Review Août-septembre 2016



    Harvard Business Law Review (HBLR) – The Harvard Business Law Review (HBLR)

    #harvard business journal

    #

    This Article addresses mutual fund governance, explaining how it has recently become entangled with the norms and rules of corporate governance. At one level, it is understandable that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and courts have viewed mutual funds as a type of ordinary corporation. Both mutual funds and corporations are separate legal entities, having directors and shareholders. Directors of each are held to fiduciary duties, charged with serving shareholders’ interests, and expected to aspire to best practices. However, there are fundamental differences between mutual funds and ordinary corporations. This Article contends that these differences have important implications for governance, differences that should lead to the disentanglement of mutual fund governance from corporate governance.

    We examine firm lifecycles of 3,081 IPOs from 1996–2012. We find that small IPOs have a different lifecycle than other, larger companies. Within five years of an IPO, only 55% of small capitalization companies remain listed on a public exchange, compared to 61% and 67% for middle and large capitalization companies, respectively. We examine various theories explaining the decline of the small IPO. We find only minor evidence that regulatory changes caused the decline of the small IPO. The decline appears instead to be more attributable to the historical unsuitability of small firms for the public market. Absent economic or market reforms that change small firm quality, further regulatory reforms to enhance the small IPO market are thus unlikely to be effective or bring firms into the public market that have the horsepower to remain publicly listed.

    In Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Congress instructed the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to draft rules that would require public companies to report annually on whether their products contain certain Congolese minerals. This unprecedented legislation and the SEC rulemaking that followed have inspired an impassioned and ongoing debate between those who view these efforts as a costly misstep and those who view them as a measured response to human rights abuses committed by the armed groups that control many mines in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This Article for the first time brings empirical evidence to bear on this controversy.

    In 2008, the Securities and Exchange Commission made waves by deciding to regulate the nascent peer-to-peer lending industry. Only two lending platforms survived the SEC’s entry into a previously lightly-regulated market. Under this regulatory setup, the SEC would regulate the lending-investing process, while other agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Federal Trade Commission would regulate the borrower side of the business. This Article argues that the existing bifurcated system works and is continually getting better as the SEC amends existing exemptions and introduces new regulations to smooth the path for financial innovation.

    Since 1977, with the enactment of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the United States Department of Justice has played a leading role in applying the Act’s anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions in enforcement proceedings against numerous companies and individuals worldwide. In November 2015, the Department of Justice took the unprecedented step of hiring a Compliance Counsel to guide its prosecutors in decision-making in corporate prosecutions and in benchmarking corporate compliance. This Memorandum is composed as an open letter to the Compliance Counsel, focusing on how she and the Department of Justice should go about that critical benchmarking function.

    Eric J. Chang’s provocative article, www.PayDayLoans.gov: A Solution for Restoring Price-Competition to Short-Term Credit Loans—which, as its title suggests, proposes to facilitate price competition in the payday lending market by creating a federal online exchange for payday lenders to post lending rates—has sparked thoughtful reactions among consumer borrowing experts. This Response provides constructive criticism to Chang’s proposal, arguing that such an exchange is unlikely to meet its goal of restoring price competition and offering tweaks that would raise the likelihood of doing so.



    Dell OptiPlex 9020 Review 2016 #business #communication


    #business computers

    #

    Dell OptiPlex 9020 Review

    PROS / The processor has a good PassMark score.

    CONS / The 290-watt power supply unit isn t sufficient for much expansion.

    VERDICT / The Dell OptiPlex 9020 has an excellent processor and sufficient memory to run all your critical business software, but it lacks many upgrades and the option to add components.

    The Dell OptiPlex 9020 comes in four form factors, which gives you plenty of sizes to choose from to fit your office’s needs. We reviewed the largest, because it gives you the most power and opportunity to grow with your business. The quad-core 3.6GHz processor offers a lot of power to multitask and run all your necessary programs. However, the power supply unit is below average, which means you may need to upgrade it if you add components later.

    To determine the best business computers. performance was the priority. To evaluate performance, we looked at the processor’s PassMark score, an industry benchmarking score submitted by actual users. Then we analyzed the RAM and storage, followed by connectivity and expansion potential. The best business computer must be able to handle all of your necessary apps without slowing down, and it needs to be able to store all of your files. As a result, the Dell OptiPlex is among the best business computers available.

    8011.40 PassMark Score

    The best aspect of the OptiPlex 9020 is the processor, which is an Intel Core i7-4790. This processor has an 8-MB cache and a base speed of 3.6GHz. The PassMark score is 10,017. This is among the highest scores in our review. The highest is 11,000. This score indicates that the processor is easily capable of handling significant multitasking and data-intensive tasks.

    We determined that 6,000 was the minimum PassMark score for a processor to have a sufficient multitasking abilities. Since an increase of 3,000 in a score is reflective of an exponential increase in processing abilities, the i7-4790 is more than twice as powerful as the minimum passable requirement.

    The OptiPlex 9020 has 8GB of memory, which is standard for an office PC. This is enough RAM to ensure your business can multitask without experiencing dips in performance. Most business-related software isn’t data-intensive, so 8GB of RAM gives you ample room to run many programs at once. The one downside is that you can’t upgrade the memory before purchase, which is important if you use data-intensive programs like 3D rendering or video editing software. However, you can manually install up to 64 GB of RAM to the motherboard, which gives you a lot of flexibility for future growth.

    The hard drive has 500GB of storage, which is disappointing. Most business computers start at 1TB of storage. However, if you deal with videos, graphics and audio, then you can upgrade to a 2-TB hard drive. With four expansion slots, you have the ability to manually install additional hard drives as needed.

    With eight USB 2.0 ports and four USB 3.0 ports, you have many options for plugging in external devices like flash drives, scanners and card readers. Most electronic devices that communicate with a computer connect via a USB port. USB 2.0 is still the most commonly used USB port, but USB 3.0 is the fastest connection.

    A downside to the OptiPlex 9020 is the 290-watt power supply unit. The best business computers have a power supply unit rated between 460 and 490 watts. This is important for adding components like extra hard drives and optical drives. A weak power supply unit limits the computer’s ability to expand with the needs of your business. Fortunately, you can upgrade the power supply.

    Summary

    The Dell OptiPlex 9020 is a powerful business computer because it comes with a quad-core processor and 8GB of memory. However, it only has a 500-GB hard drive, and the power supply unit is on the weak side. This small business computer performs, but it lacks the storage and expansion potential of the best PCs in our review.



    Udemy Business Strategy Courses Review #business #technology


    #business strategy

    #

    Udemy Business Strategy Courses Review

    A strategy can be defined in many different ways, but essentially all definitions encompass several key elements. A business strategy is defined as the decisions a company makes when it comes to discuss its business objectives and the ways of achieving them. A good strategy will include the clear definition of goals, as well as the plan with which the company will pursue said goals.

    An Udemy business strategy class can prepare you with ways to best create and implement a business strategy. More than anything, strategy training is first and foremost about analysis. One must understand the business they are in, the market surrounding it, and the obstacles and/or competition which stands in the way of achieving the goals that were set. Because the business world can be unpredictable, analysis is crucial. When done correctly, analysis of internal and external data can help maximize the company’s potential, make smart use of its resources, and gear it towards success.

    A strategy should also include the scope of the business, and the value or impact – monetary or otherwise – that the company will have on itself, its environment, its customers, clients, and shareholders. In that sense, strategy is the very foundation of any business, company, or enterprise. A strategy makes plain the bigger questions which drive any business: what business are we in? How do we succeed in it, taking into account our available resources? What are our objectives, on a small and large scale? How do we make those objectives happen in the best possible way?

    Business Strategies, thanks to Udemy

    The Udemy business strategy courses page displays the top free courses, the top paid courses, and new and mention-worthy courses. Examples of the courses are: Sales and Business Case Development ($89), Productivity Management Formula ($125), Listbuilding for Internet Marketers ($199), and Foundations of Business Strategy (Free).

    The courses on Udemy also provide training which promotes innovation, smart planning, and customer retention. Udemy offers courses on drafting a business plan, naming a business, using the internet for marketing purposes, and managing a product responsibly.

    Idea Validation

    One very popular course is Idea Validation from idea to paying customer in 1 day, by instructor Evan Kimbrell. Kimbrell is the founder and director of San Francisco-based SprintKick, a digital agency which provides solutions to anyone and everyone with an idea. From design through development to deployment – Kimbrell’s company does it all, and has a proven track record.

    Kimbrell’s course is all about validating a business idea before deploying it, sort of ‘beta testing’ it in the shallow waters. In his course, Kimbrell teaches students how to develop an idea from scratch, experiment with it, and avoid the problems and pitfalls which cause many – if not all – business ventures to fall flat on their faces. The course has over 51 lectures and nearly 9 hours of content, and has been taken by nearly 4000 students. This course has no pre-requisites, other than an internet connection. Of course, some knowledge of basic online research techniques can be beneficial, but it is not necessary.

    This course is intended for anyone with an idea: entrepreneurs, product managers, small business owners, marketers, and basically anyone who is interested in testing the waters online before committing to a specific plan.

    Analyzing An Idea (or Product)

    Kimbrell’s course is the very definition of good business strategizing. It aims to help out those who already have an idea or product, but are interested in analysis. Kimbrell’s teaches his students to analyze their idea or product, and the market in which they are in, in order to see if the goals which they are interested in achieving are indeed achievable. According to Kimbrell, most businesses fail because they lack proper planning and testing. In his course, he provides valuable tools which will save those who use them time and money, and ensure that once they finally do launch, there will be a lot less risk involved.

    Students which took the course had very good things to say about both the class itself and its instructor. Only one student said he was forced to listen to the lectures in the form of a podcast, since Kimbrell’s body language was very distracting. Kimbrell’s course is well-organized, and provides a great starting point for all business newcomers.

    Related topics are found on the strategy Udemy page. Courses on productivity, finance. web development. and running a home business are displayed as quick links, for easy access and navigation throughout the Udemy website .



    Lenovo ThinkCentre M93p Tiny Review & Rating #starting #a #business #ideas


    #business computer

    #

    Lenovo ThinkCentre M93p Tiny

    Extremely compact form factor, one could say it’s tiny. Five USB 3.0 ports. Multi-monitor support. Windows 7 Professional pre-installed, Windows 8 Pro also included. vPro manageability.

    Need adapter for HDMI. No 5GHz Wi-Fi. No Internal expansion.

    The diminutive Lenovo ThinkCentre M93p Tiny works equally well in small, medium, or gargantuan sized businesses. It takes up almost no space on your desk, but is still a full-featured desktop instead of a thin client box.

    Enterprise IT purports to be all about cloud and centralized server-based computing, but thin clients and centralized computing isn’t necessarily the right fit for all businesses. For the majority of small, medium, and large business out there, Lenovo ThinkCentre M93p Tiny gives your users a compact, hide-anywhere desktop PC that has full Windows PC power without the complexity issues of thin clients, and without the theft and reliability concerns that laptops bring. It’s a good fit for businesses of all sizes, and dovetail with Lenovo’s larger chassis PCs, which share disk images and support hardware. The M93p Tiny is our latest Editors’ Choice for business desktops.

    Compare Similar Products

    Design and Features
    The M93p Tiny essentially is the same chassis as the previous Lenovo ThinkCentre M92p Tiny ($580). Both are about 1.5 by 7 by 7 inches (HWD), which puts them in the ultra small form factor (a.k.a, one-liter category). To put this into perspective, the Apple Mac mini (Late 2012) ($1,049) is approximately 1.3-1.4 liters in volume, Lenovo’s normal small form factor chassis is 11 liters, and a desktop tower is 25 liters. This means that there is no internal expansion room to speak of aside from a spare memory slot to expand the existing 4GB. Inside the chassis you’ll find an Intel Core i5-4570T processor with Intel HD Graphics 4600, 4GB of memory, and a 2.5-inch 500GB hard drive. You (or your IT folks) can configure the system with a larger capacity hard drive or a smaller, but faster SSD. There is a mini PCIe slot in the M92p Tiny, and in this case it’s configured with an Intel Centrino-N 105 Wi-Fi card, which gives the system wireless connectivity, though only on the 2.4GHz 802.11 b/g/n bands.

    The M93p Tiny came with Windows 7 Professional pre-loaded, but also comes with a license and recovery DVD for Windows 8 Pro. This means that the system is ready for Windows 8 when and if your company decides to switch operating systems. The system has vPro certified components, so you can integrate the system with your enterprise standard network and device management infrastructure. You don’t have to use vPro (it doesn’t make much sense to use vPro in a small 5 person office), but it is a good option for the growing business or small remote office in a larger corporation. Even a typical five-person business can take advantage of the fact that the M93p can share disk images, so you can keep spare hard drives ready in case of malware or Windows problems that inevitably crop up. This is a plus for the M93p Tiny over the current business Editors’ Choice Polywell B8500 ($899), which is better suited for SMB situations that don’t scale. The Polywell B8500 we reviewed also had less USB 3.0 ports, no Wi-Fi, and a much louder cooling fan, which may be a problem in quiet offices.

    The system can disappear behind a monitor with an optional VESA mount, or you can mount it below a desk, so it’s almost invisible in practice. You can even lock it the PC chassis itself away, since one of the USB ports can make the keyboard emulate a power button with a control key command. The M93p Tiny rivals thin clients, which use small boxes to connect to a centralized applications server. In fact, it’s better, since thin clients don’t do any of their calculations locally, so thin client users will be subject to work stoppages if servers go down. With the M93p and other full PCs, you’ll be able to complete your work locally even if the central server is down. The M93p Tiny is more flexible than all-in-one desktops like the Dell OptiPlex 3011 ($1,419.28), since you can use large screen monitors with the M93p Tiny. In fact, the M93p Tiny can drive up to four monitors using both DisplayPorts and dual display adapters.

    Performance
    The M93p Tiny has the chops to last for years in general office service. While the Polywell B8500 is admittedly a bit faster on multimedia tests like Handbrake (0:35) and Adobe Phootshop CS6 (3:06), due to its fourth-generation Core i7 processor, the M93p Tiny (1:02 Handbrake, 4:53 CS6) certainly can keep up and even match performance for older Core i7-powered systems like last year’s EC winning Dell Vostro 470 ($949) (1:04 Handbrake). The M93p Tiny scored a decent 2,789 points on the day-to-day PCMark 7 test, though it fell a little behind on that test compared to the Dell Vostro 470 (3,483 points). This is likely due to the M93p Tiny’s internal hard drive, which can be swapped out for a speedier SSD if your workers need day-to-day speed. Essentailly, the M93p Tiny has the power to last the three to five years shelf life of a business PC.

    The Lenovo ThinkCentre M93p Tiny follows its older sibling, improving on some of its shortcomings like Wi-Fi and increasing the number of USB 3.0 ports. The M93p Tiny may not be as fast as the Polywell B8500 on the benchmark table, but it is quieter, more conducive to IT management, and more versatile than that specialized system. For these reasons, it takes over as our recommended Editors’ Choice for business desktop PCs.

    PCMag may earn affiliate commissions from the shopping links included on this page. These commissions do not affect how we test, rate or review products. To find out more, read our complete terms of use .

    Joel Santo Domingo is the Lead Analyst for the Desktops team at PC Magazine Labs. He joined PC Magazine in 2000, after 7 years of IT work for companies large and small. His background includes managing mobile, desktop and network infrastructure on both the Macintosh and Windows platforms. Joel is proof that you can escape the retail grind: he wore a yellow polo shirt early in his tech career. Along the way Joel earned a BA in English Literature and an MBA in Information Technology. More

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  • Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 Review 2016 #free #business #cards


    #business computers

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    Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 Review

    PROS / It features a quad-core processor and a dedicated graphics card.

    CONS / It only has eight USB ports.

    VERDICT / The Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 is one of the best business computers. It combines a high-end processor with 8GB of memory, 1TB of storage and excellent support.

    Everything about the Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 is fast, reliable and capable of expanding with your business. It comes with a military-grade chassis, which makes it one of the most durable business computers on the market. It also features excellent support to ensure that your business is up and running quickly if components break down. It has the high-end Intel i7 quad-core processor, 8GB of memory, a dedicated graphics card and 1TB of storage. The many upgradable options and expansion features allow you to conform it to fit your business’ needs. For these reasons, it earns the Top Ten Reviews Bronze Award for best business computer .

    For our review, we emphasized performance, which starts with the processor. To evaluate performance, we started by looking at the PassMark score of the CPU. Then we assessed the installed RAM and storage. Finally, we evaluated the connectivity and expansion potential of the chassis. The best business desktop computers provide excellent performance with the ability to expand to meet your business’ needs.

    8011.40 PassMark Score

    Performance

    With the Intel Core i7-6700, you get a quad-core processor that has eight threads of execution, which is almost like having eight cores. This provides exceptional computing power that allows you to multitask without slowing down your computer, which is illustrated in the high PassMark score of 11,000.

    Out of the 10 computers we reviewed, this is the best processor. Since we determined that a 6,000 PassMark score was the minimum passable score, you can see that this business desktop computer clearly has the processing power needed to handle running multiple business apps at a time.

    In addition to the excellent CPU, the M900 is one of the few business PCs in our review with a dedicated graphics card. It comes with the Nvidia GeForce GT 720, which has 1GB of memory. Having a dedicated graphics card means that the i7-6700 processor doesn’t process graphics until the card is maxed out. This allows it to more freely process other data. In other words, when you combine this graphics card with a quad-core processor, the performance is among the best you’ll find at this price range. You can run a video-editing program and do your taxes at the same time without a hitch.

    Memory & Storage

    The Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 comes with 8GB of memory, which is the standard amount of memory for business desktop computers at the $1,000 range. With this much memory, you won’t have any trouble running most business programs like Excel, PowerPoint and Word or data-intensive programs like video-editing software. However, if 8GB isn’t enough memory for your business, you can upgrade the RAM to as high as 32GB.

    The hard drive has 1TB of storage, which is also standard at this price point. This is most storage of any of the hard drives you can upgrade to, but you can add a second 1-TB hard drive. For most business computers, 1TB of storage is enough for several years, unless you have a lot of music and videos.

    You can upgrade the hard drive to a 256-GB solid-state drive, which can add a lot of value to an office PC’s performance, because the data is accessed much faster and is less susceptible to drive failures as there are no moving parts.

    Connectivity

    The ThinkCentre M900 has only eight USB ports, which is the least number of ports for a business computer. Each port is a USB 3.0, which are also compatible with USB 2.0 devices. The best business computers have at least 12 USB ports. You want to have at least two or three ports more than what you know you’ll need. For comparison, the best you can get on a business desktop computer is up to 14 USB ports. However, you can add more USB 2.0 ports for a fee.

    The M900 also lacks a media card reader, which reads memory sticks and memory cards commonly used in phones, cameras and other handheld digital devices. You can add a media card reader prior to purchase, but it costs extra.

    Expansion Potential

    The ThinkCentre comes with a 250-watt power supply unit, which is enough to handle the installed components but lacks the overhead for expansion. For comparison, the best business computer in our review has a power supply unit of 460 watts with similar specifications. Without sufficient overhead, you’ll have to upgrade the power supply unit before installing any more components.

    There are four expansion slots on the motherboard, with two internal drive bays and two external drive bays. These allow you to add more hard drives to increase storage or other devices needed for your business, like audio or video cards. But as mentioned, you need to upgrade the power supply unit if you add any components.

    Help & Support

    Lenovo has one of the best support systems for business computers, with one caveat the M900 only comes with a one-year warranty. However, Lenovo’s warranty covers parts, labor and on-site service. You can also customize your service and extend your warranty up to five years. These are vital support features for a business computer, because you can’t afford for your computer to break down.

    The company offers additional support like asset recovery, online data backup and remote diagnosis. These services help you ensure your business’ vital information is always safe and accessible.

    Summary

    With an Intel i7-6700 quad-core processor, 8GB of memory and 1TB of storage, the Lenovo ThinkCentre M900 business computer is a high-performance machine with one of the best support systems available. The connectivity is subpar, and the expansion potential is hindered by a weak power supply unit, but these issues can be remedied with simple upgrades. It’s clearly among the best business computers on the market.



    HP EliteDesk 800 Review 2016 #business #startup #loans


    #business computers

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    HP EliteDesk 800 Review

    PROS / It has a quad-core processor.

    CONS / It only comes with 4 GB of memory.

    VERDICT / The HP EliteDesk 800 has a powerful high-end processor, but it comes with below-average storage.

    Many office PC brands are marketed to both consumers and businesses, but the HP EliteDesk 800 series is designed specifically for small and medium-sized businesses. The cost-effective design makes it a great option if you need multiple computers for your business. However, while the processor is adequate for multitasking with a lot of business-oriented software, it lacks the power you’d find in the best business computers .

    For our review of business computers, we looked primarily at the processor for performance. To do this, we used the PassMark score of the processor, which is a user-submitted score based on industry benchmarking tests. Then we analyzed the RAM and the storage. The best business computers should provide excellent performance with sufficient storage. Finally, we evaluated the chassis’ connectivity and expansion potential, as you should get an office PC that can expand with the needs of your business.

    8011.40 PassMark Score

    The HP EliteDesk 800’s processor is the Intel i5-6500, which is a quad-core processor with a 6MB cache and 3.6GHz speed. In the PassMark benchmark tests, this processer has a score of 7,035, which is well-above the passable mark of 6,000. This means this desktop has sufficient processing power to multitask with most business apps. However, the highest PassMark score in our review is 11,000. A difference of 3,000 in a PassMark score is generally considered to be exponential, meaning that the best processor in our review is more than twice as good as this processor at multitasking and processing data.

    The EliteDesk also lacks a dedicated graphics card, which means that the graphics are integrated with the i5-6500 processor. This computer will struggle to handle data-intensive graphics programs like AutoCAD. However, you can upgrade the processor and add a dedicated graphics card prior to purchase, though at a significant cost.

    You get 4GB of memory and a 500-GB hard drive, which is disappointing. While 4GB of RAM is plenty for most business apps like Microsoft Office and Excel, 8GB of memory is the preferred standard. Also, the best office PC has at least 1TB of storage. The best business computer in our review, the Dell XPS 8900, comes with 16GB of RAM. However, you can upgrade the memory to 8GB, and you can upgrade the storage to 4TB. In addition, the motherboard can support up to 64GB of RAM, though you have to manually install the memory yourself.

    The motherboard has four expansion slots, which is standard. This allows you to add hard drives or other devices, like upgraded audio or video cards. In addition, eight USB 3.0 ports and two USB 2.0 ports give you plenty of ways to connect external devices like card scanners and printers. These features make the EliteDesk an office PC that can grow with your business. When you need more out of your business computer, you can add the necessary hardware.

    Another downside to the HP EliteDesk 800 G1 is the lack of some important support services with HP. While you get a three-year warranty that covers labor and parts, HP doesn’t have asset-recovery services, online backup or remote diagnostic services. These are important services, because your business computer is a critical aspect of your business. If it fails or you’re having trouble with some components, it affects your business.

    Summary

    The HP EliteDesk 800 has the quad-core processor and memory necessary to make sure that your computer doesn’t slow down while multitasking with basic software, but the Intel Core i5-6500 processor has a middling PassMark score of 7,035. The 4GB of RAM and 500GB hard drive is disappointing, but you can easily add more hard drives as needed to fit your business needs. The lack of support services means you may not be able to retrieve vital information if you encounter a problem though.