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Advancing Victorian Manufacturing is the Victorian Government’s blueprint for growth of manufacturing in Victoria.

Running a small business

You can do good and make money at the same time. That’s the message from Bessi Graham of The Difference Incubator.

Running a small business

Victorian Government support is available to businesses experiencing significant rises to gas and electricity costs.

Running a small business

Small Business Victoria Workshops are low cost, practical and run by experts in their fields year round across metro and regional Victoria.

Running a small business

To help get your business moving, the Small Business Bus is now touring Victoria bringing expert advice and assistance to you.

Running a small business

Find everything you need to know about grants and assistance programs to start, run and grow your business.

Running a small business

ABLIS is a free online tool which helps you find government licences, permits and registrations applicable to your business.

Small Business Victoria Update

Tips, tools, news and events to help you run and grow your business – delivered fortnightly.



CNNMoney – Business, financial and personal finance news, running a small business.#Running

running a small business

Running a small business

Impact Investing

Running a small business

Gadgets

Running a small business

CNNMoney International Series

Traders

Running a small business

Marketplace Middle East

Running a small business

CNNMoney World

Running a small business

Innovative Cities

Running a small business

Currencies

Investing

  • Running a small business

  • Running a small business

Running a small business

Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes. All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc. . All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices are proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S P Dow Jones Indices LLC and have been licensed for use to S P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard Poor’s and S P are registered trademarks of Standard Poor’s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices S P Dow Jones Indices LLC and/or its affiliates.

2017 Cable News Network. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. Terms under which this service is provided to you. Privacy Policy. .



The Telegraph Festival of Business, running a small business.#Running #a #small #business


Festival of Business

Running a small business Running a small business

Running a small business Running a small business Running a small business Running a small business

The Telegraph Festival of Business 2017

The seventh Festival of Business will take place in London on Tuesday 7 November, 2017. This one day conference, regularly attracting an audience of 600 senior executives from UK businesses, will bring together some of the best-known names in British business, along with leading politicians and thought leaders, in a bid to ensure the continued growth of Britain’s small businesses. A combination of keynote addresses, live interviews, case studies, expert panels, quick-fire talks, and masterclasses will ensure attendees leave the conference having found inspiration, heard pioneering examples of business development and cemented valuable relationships with their peers.

Agenda

Registration and Breakfast

Welcome Address from the Chairman

Jeremy Warner, Associate Editor, The Telegraph

Lady Michelle Mone, Baroness of Mayfair OBE

Panel Session: Talent: attracting, recruiting and retaining your most valuable asset

Understand how important your company’s values are for recruitment and learn how to encourage millennials through to Gen X to join and then get them to stay. Gain insights into competing with larger companies when it comes to salary, culture and apprenticeships and delve further into the complexities of employment regulation.

Craig Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Bank

Karen Blackett, OBE Chairwoman, MediaCom UK

Kiera Lawlor, Head of Happiness, Social Chain

Kirstin Furber, People Director, BBC Worldwide

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Panel Session: Leading your business to success

Hear first hand on how to lead through change and how to successfully delegate. Gain insights into day-to-day management tips and understand the key lessons learnt by overcoming failure.

James Daunt, Chief Executive Officer, Waterstones

Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, money.co.uk

Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing, Legal General Investment Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

Networking and Refreshment Break

Quick-fire Talk: Cyber security – how to prevent the worst from happening

Senior Representative, National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

Q A: Late Payments: can common ground be found?

A discussion that speaks to both sides, is honest about what the issues are at both ends and is constructive in terms of solutions.

Richard Gilkes, Managing Director, Stort Chemical

Philip King, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Credit Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

The importance of growth and international trade for SMEs

The Rt Hon Dr. Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for International Trade

Plotting the future of tech innovation in your business

The new tech landscape; identify fads vs genuinely useful future tech and investing wisely to make the best tech choices. Gain insights into the importance of company-wide adoption and understanding and recruiting the relevant talent to deal with changing tech and transformation.

Chief Digital Officer

Digital Marketing Lead, UK

Pfizer Innovative Health

Moderator: Robert Bridge

Chief Customer Officer

Scaling Up Your Business Operations

Gain insights and advice on whether it’s best to scale through partnerships or organically. Understand how to ensure optimal staffing when growing and how to know when to step back.

Head of Enterprise

Business Banking NatWest/RBS

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive and Co-founder

Moderator: Matt Caines

Editor, Telegraph Connect

Supporting UK business to export and grow

Which will be the new frontiers? Identifying the changes to consider following Brexit and understand cross cultural business differences. Examine the steps to take when starting to export.

Emma Jones, Founder, Enterprise Nation

Joshua Stevens, Chief Executive Officer, One Retail Group

Dr Adam Marshall, Director General, British Chambers of Commerce

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Securing your business against cyber threats

Cyber security; an issue not to be taken lightly and potentially one of the the biggest threats facing SMEs today. Understand how to achieve a cyber security 101 strategy and the preventative measures you can take and what to do when disaster strikes.

Sam Nixon, Product Owner, Decoded

Phil Lander, Director of Mobile and IT, B2B, Samsung Europe

Rowan Davies, Head of Policy and Campaigns, Mumsnet

Moderator: Stephan Freeman, Chief Information Security Officer, The Telegraph



Business – definition of business by The Free Dictionary, running a small

business

These nouns apply to forms of activity that have the objective of supplying products or services for a fee. Business pertains broadly to commercial, financial, and industrial activity, and more narrowly to specific fields or firms engaging in this activity: a company that does business over the internet; went into the software consulting business; owns a dry-cleaning business. Industry entails the production and manufacture of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale: the computer industry. Commerce and trade refer to the exchange and distribution of goods or commodities: laws regulating interstate commerce; involved in the domestic fur trade. Traffic pertains in particular to businesses engaged in the transportation of goods or passengers: renovated the docks to attract shipping traffic. The word may also suggest illegal trade: discovered a brisk traffic in stolen goods.

busi ness

Business

  1. As oxygen is the disintegrating principle of life, working night and day to dissolve, separate, pull apart and dissipate, so there is something in business that continually tends to scatter, destroy and shift possession from this man to that. A million mice nibble eternally at every business venture Elbert Hubbard
  2. Business is like a man rowing a boat upstream. He has no choice; he must go ahead or he will go back Lewis E. Pierson
  3. Business is like oil. It won t mix with anything but business J. Grahame
  4. Business is very much like religion: it is founded on faith William McFee
  5. Business policy flows downhill from the mountain, like water Anon
  6. A business without customers is like a computer without bytes Anon

As the entries that follow show, this concept lends itself to many additional twists.

Playwrights Ernst and Lindley wrote this simile to be spoken by a judge in their 1930 s play Hold Your Tongue.

The first two words are transposed from Computer companies to generalize the comparison.

business

Business is the work of making, buying, and selling goods or services.

When you use business in this sense, don’t say ‘a business’. Don’t say, for example, ‘ We’ve got a business to do ‘. You say ‘We’ve got some business to do’.

You can talk about a particular area of business using the followed by a noun followed by business.

A business is a company, shop, or organization that makes and sells goods or provides a service.



5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business #cheap #business #ideas


#running a small business

#

5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business

January 12, 2016

I ve been a creative entrepreneur since 2005. My first design company was a partnership with my significant other. It was largely a freestyle experiment in running a business, conducted live over the course of five years. As a business, it was marginally successful. As a learning experience, it was my equivalent of a masters of business administration.

So, by the time I had started my second and current company, I had a pretty good blueprint of don t s for running a small business. I had been fortunate enough to make the mistakes that have yielded five valuable lessons learned — lessons that have truly paid off the second time around.

1. Don t rush into partnerships.

It was only after my original partner and I parted ways did I recognize that we should never have had a professional partnership in the first place. Just because someone is your best friend, long-time coworker and / or significant other hardly qualifies them as the perfect candidate for maintaining a business. I say maintaining because it s far easier to get excited about the prospect starting a company than being able to handle the day-to-day reality of running it efficiently.

The best partner is typically someone whose skills and approach are the polar opposite of yours. The first ensures the you are able to cover a lot more ground without additional employees. The second may create conflict, but it ll force you both to defend your business instincts and weed out lesser ideas before you waste resources.

2. Don t get discouraged.

Running a company isn t a goal — it s a long, winding road. Enjoy the process! Unless your goal is to cash out, and you ve got some built-in exit strategy, chances are you want a long-term entrepreneurial career. You will have ups, and you will have downs — possibly in the same week or even day. You will gain amazing clients and lose others for reasons fair and unfair. That s all part of having a business.

I ve yet to encounter a single business owner who s reached some grand, stable plateau beyond failure, disappointment and doubt. We all experience it. Instead of discouragement, focus on becoming more resilient, on learning how to handle stress productively.

3. Don t forget why you wanted to start a business in the first place.

Whether it s following a passion or having more control over your time to devote to family, always remember why you started down this road in the first place. It s easy to get carried away and forget what it was you wanted from your own business. I, for example, was driven by quality-of-life factors, especially time off for my other passion — travel. At times, temporary sacrifice may be truly necessary, but it pays to be conscious of when you re in danger of permanently shelving the very thing you wanted most.

4. Don t try to do everything yourself.

I started my first company with $500 — barely enough to cover the costs of incorporation. So, right away, I developed an addiction to doing everything myself. My partner was only capable, willing and able to do so much, and I found myself doing a lot of admin tasks I never anticipated. Those tasks came with learning curves, and they took up valuable time and energy — energy that could have been directed at helping the business grow.

I didn t make this mistake twice. With my second, far more successful attempt, I contracted my business half just a couple of months in. Although my expenses grew, now I could focus on doing better work as well as devote time to business development. Both actions helped to grow the company far quicker than my former money-saving attempts at being my own bookkeeper.

So, resist the urge to cover all the ground alone. Saving financial resources is important, but don t let your task list undermine your big goals.

5. Don t stop evolving.

Your strategy, your marketing plan, your target market — nothing is set in stone. The world is changing more and more rapidly each day. Your industry will likely experience a shift, whether slight or monumental, at some point. As a small business, you are at a disadvantage, because your resources are a lot more limited. But you have a priceless advantage in ability to change course and adapt far quicker than a larger organization.

The best way to remain relevant is keeping your eyes open for changing tides, your mind open to new ideas and staying flexible.

And, of course, don t be too afraid of making your own mistakes!



Running a business from home #business #analyst


#home business

#

Running a business from home

You may need permission or separate insurance to run a home business, and you’ll need to check if you have to pay business rates.

Permissions

To run a business from your home, you may need permission from your:

  • mortgage provider or landlord
  • local planning office – eg if you’re planning on making major alterations to your home
  • local council – eg if you’re going to get lots of customers or deliveries, you want to advertise outside your home or if you need a licence to run your business

Insurance

You may need insurance for your business. Home insurance may not cover your business (eg stock, computers, customers visiting your premises). You can find an authorised insurer on the British Insurance Brokers’ Association (BIBA) website.

Tax allowances

You can include your business costs in your Self Assessment tax return if you’re a sole trader or part of a business partnership.

You can claim a proportion of the cost of things like council tax, heating, lighting, phone calls and broadband. You can use a flat rate to calculate your simplified allowable expenses starting from the 2013 to 2014 tax year.

You may need to pay Capital Gains Tax on the part of your property you used for your business if you sell your home.

Business rates

You may have to pay business rates on the part of your property that you use for your business.

This depends on whether the Valuation Office Agency (VOA ) (local assessor in Scotland) has given a rateable value to a part of your home.

You’ll still have to pay Council Tax on the rest of your property.

To check if you have to pay business rates, contact the VOA (or your local assessor in Scotland).

You may qualify for small business rate relief if your property has a rateable value of £12,000 or less.

Health and safety



Running a business from home #local #businesses


#home business

#

Running a business from home

You may need permission or separate insurance to run a home business, and you’ll need to check if you have to pay business rates.

Permissions

To run a business from your home, you may need permission from your:

  • mortgage provider or landlord
  • local planning office – eg if you’re planning on making major alterations to your home
  • local council – eg if you’re going to get lots of customers or deliveries, you want to advertise outside your home or if you need a licence to run your business

Insurance

You may need insurance for your business. Home insurance may not cover your business (eg stock, computers, customers visiting your premises). You can find an authorised insurer on the British Insurance Brokers’ Association (BIBA) website.

Tax allowances

You can include your business costs in your Self Assessment tax return if you’re a sole trader or part of a business partnership.

You can claim a proportion of the cost of things like council tax, heating, lighting, phone calls and broadband. You can use a flat rate to calculate your simplified allowable expenses starting from the 2013 to 2014 tax year.

You may need to pay Capital Gains Tax on the part of your property you used for your business if you sell your home.

Business rates

You may have to pay business rates on the part of your property that you use for your business.

This depends on whether the Valuation Office Agency (VOA ) (local assessor in Scotland) has given a rateable value to a part of your home.

You’ll still have to pay Council Tax on the rest of your property.

To check if you have to pay business rates, contact the VOA (or your local assessor in Scotland).

You may qualify for small business rate relief if your property has a rateable value of £12,000 or less.

Health and safety



5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business #small #business #idea


#running a small business

#

5 Things Not to Do Running a Small Business

January 12, 2016

I ve been a creative entrepreneur since 2005. My first design company was a partnership with my significant other. It was largely a freestyle experiment in running a business, conducted live over the course of five years. As a business, it was marginally successful. As a learning experience, it was my equivalent of a masters of business administration.

So, by the time I had started my second and current company, I had a pretty good blueprint of don t s for running a small business. I had been fortunate enough to make the mistakes that have yielded five valuable lessons learned — lessons that have truly paid off the second time around.

1. Don t rush into partnerships.

It was only after my original partner and I parted ways did I recognize that we should never have had a professional partnership in the first place. Just because someone is your best friend, long-time coworker and / or significant other hardly qualifies them as the perfect candidate for maintaining a business. I say maintaining because it s far easier to get excited about the prospect starting a company than being able to handle the day-to-day reality of running it efficiently.

The best partner is typically someone whose skills and approach are the polar opposite of yours. The first ensures the you are able to cover a lot more ground without additional employees. The second may create conflict, but it ll force you both to defend your business instincts and weed out lesser ideas before you waste resources.

2. Don t get discouraged.

Running a company isn t a goal — it s a long, winding road. Enjoy the process! Unless your goal is to cash out, and you ve got some built-in exit strategy, chances are you want a long-term entrepreneurial career. You will have ups, and you will have downs — possibly in the same week or even day. You will gain amazing clients and lose others for reasons fair and unfair. That s all part of having a business.

I ve yet to encounter a single business owner who s reached some grand, stable plateau beyond failure, disappointment and doubt. We all experience it. Instead of discouragement, focus on becoming more resilient, on learning how to handle stress productively.

3. Don t forget why you wanted to start a business in the first place.

Whether it s following a passion or having more control over your time to devote to family, always remember why you started down this road in the first place. It s easy to get carried away and forget what it was you wanted from your own business. I, for example, was driven by quality-of-life factors, especially time off for my other passion — travel. At times, temporary sacrifice may be truly necessary, but it pays to be conscious of when you re in danger of permanently shelving the very thing you wanted most.

4. Don t try to do everything yourself.

I started my first company with $500 — barely enough to cover the costs of incorporation. So, right away, I developed an addiction to doing everything myself. My partner was only capable, willing and able to do so much, and I found myself doing a lot of admin tasks I never anticipated. Those tasks came with learning curves, and they took up valuable time and energy — energy that could have been directed at helping the business grow.

I didn t make this mistake twice. With my second, far more successful attempt, I contracted my business half just a couple of months in. Although my expenses grew, now I could focus on doing better work as well as devote time to business development. Both actions helped to grow the company far quicker than my former money-saving attempts at being my own bookkeeper.

So, resist the urge to cover all the ground alone. Saving financial resources is important, but don t let your task list undermine your big goals.

5. Don t stop evolving.

Your strategy, your marketing plan, your target market — nothing is set in stone. The world is changing more and more rapidly each day. Your industry will likely experience a shift, whether slight or monumental, at some point. As a small business, you are at a disadvantage, because your resources are a lot more limited. But you have a priceless advantage in ability to change course and adapt far quicker than a larger organization.

The best way to remain relevant is keeping your eyes open for changing tides, your mind open to new ideas and staying flexible.

And, of course, don t be too afraid of making your own mistakes!



Running a Drop Shipping Business – The eCommerceFuel Blog #micro #business #ideas


#drop shipping business

#

Running a Drop Shipping Business

The following Q A answers many common questions associated with starting and running a drop shipping business. For a real-world example, you ll want to read this post which details the fulfillment process in one of my own businesses. TrollingMotors.net.

Jump to questions/answers:

What do I need – and much does it cost – to start a drop shipping business?

To properly set up a drop shipping business in the U.S. you ll need:

  • To incorporate a business with your state (Approximately $150 to $300)
  • Request an EIN number from the IRS (free)
  • Request a sales-tax ID from your state (if your state charges sales tax, usually free)
  • Find and establish a relationship / open an account with a drop shipper (free)
  • (Recommended) Create your own eCommerce website (Approx. $10 to $50 per month)

The costs will vary based on your circumstances, but in most cases you should be able to get a drop shipping business up-and-running for less than $400. For more information on finding suppliers, please see the section on finding drop shipping companies.

Do drop shippers provide customer service and/or talk with my customers?

No. As the retailer, you re 100% responsible for dealing with customers. You ll need to build and market your website, handle customers support issues, solve problems and deal with any issues that arise. You ll act as the intermediary between your supplier and your customer.

How do I submit orders to suppliers?

Each drop shipping wholesaler will be different. Most suppliers (but not all) will accept orders via email. Many will accept them over the phone, and those with more advanced websites will accept them online. A few sophisticated suppliers will even allow you to submit your orders in bulk via a specially formatted XML or CSV file.

What is the turnaround time for fulfilling a drop shipped order?

This will vary based on the quality of the supplier, and their location. Most decent suppliers should be able to process, pack and ship out an order the same-day if it s received by noon their local time.

How do I get tracking information for orders?

This will also vary by drop shipper. A quality drop shipping wholesaler will provide tracking information via email in plain text or in a specially formatted .CSV or .XML file. Tracking information should be received immediately after the shipment is processed or by the end of the day the order was shipped. Once you receive a tracking number, it s your responsibility to pass it along to your customer usually through your shopping cart interface.

One mark of a poor drop shipper is delays in sending you order verification and tracking information and/or making you log-in to their website to retrieve tracking numbers.

How do I pay my supplier?

Starting out, a drop shipper requires you to have a credit card on file to pay for orders. When getting a business credit card, make sure you get a Visa or Mastercard as many suppliers won t accept Discover or American Express.

Once you ve built up a relationship and track record, you may be given the option of Net 15 or Net 30 terms. This means that the supplier will extend you credit, and simply keep track of what you owe. Then, you ll need to pay them by check within 15 or 30 days.

I have established, multi-year relationships with numerous drop shipping suppliers and still prefer to pay by credit card over Net terms. Why? It s more convenient, I don t have to write and mail a check, and I can rack up some serious reward points using the right rewards credit cards. In fact, I was able to accumulate enough rewards to pay for a trip around the world .

Who pays for the shipping costs on orders?

While a drop shipper will usually use their own UPS/FedEx/USPS account to pay for shipping, they ll pass along the cost to you when billing you for the order. It s up to you how much to charge your end customer for shipping.

Do orders appear like they came directly from my company?

Yes! This is one of the great things about the drop shipping model. Most drop shippers will put your company s name and logo on packing slips and invoices, as well as your return address. So it appears like the package was shipped directly from you.

How do returns from customers work?

Most drop shipping companies will have restrictions on what can and can t be returned. So you ll need to make sure you clearly communicate (both before the purchase AND before accepting the return from the customer) that it meets these criteria.

Most suppliers will issue you a RA (Return Authorization) number. This unique number will identify the return in their system. Once received, simply pass along this RA number along with the address of the warehouse to your customer.

Once the supplier receives the return, they should send you a notification along with a credit invoice showing that they ve credited you for the item. Then, you in turn refund the customer who purchased from your store.

Who pays for return shipping on returns?

This will vary from retailer to retailer, but here are the policies I have in place and highly recommend:

For Defective Items: If a customer received a defective item, I feel it s my business responsibility to pay all the associated costs to get them a working product! Some store owners will argue:

We didn t make the product! It s not our fault! A defective item is the risk a customer takes for purchasing.”

but I think that s a poor way to do business, and provides a very bad experience for your customer.

I recommend paying for the return shipping costs incurred by the customer to send back the item, as well as the costs involved with shipping out a new replacement. In the event the product is very low-value (costs $20 or less), I ll often ship the customer a free replacement without requiring them to return the old product. This is often easier, faster and cheaper than paying to have a customer return a cheap defective product.

On the bright side, if a product is genuinely defective, most drop shipping wholesalers will pay for the shipping cost of sending out a new item, which means you ll only need to cover the cost of shipping from the customer to the warehouse.

For Non-Defective Items: If the customer decides to return an item due to incorrect selection – or because they simply changed their mind – they will usually be responsible for paying for return shipping fees. However, if the product was incorrectly advertised or presented on the website, the business should cover return fees if this was the cause of the problem or incompatibility.

Do drop shippers ship internationally?

This varies widely by drop shipper, so you ll need to check. I would say approximately half of the drop shippers I work with will ship internationally.

International shipments can quickly get expensive, and getting accurate quotes regarding shipping fees, customs and duties for hundreds of countries is complex. It also takes a drop shipper significantly more time to process an international order as there is more paperwork involved. Some will charge an additional fee while others simply won t bother.

Also, issues with returns and fraud get a bit more complicated with international shipments. If an international customer receives a defective product, getting them a replacement will be significantly more expensive. And the likelihood of fraud and abuse increase with international shipments.

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