Tag : Social

Business Ethics and Social Responsibility #stock #market #quotes


#business ethics

#

Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

Also See the Library’s Blog Related to Ethics and Social Responsibility

In addition to the articles on this current page, also see the following blog that has posts related to Ethics and Social Responsibility. Scan down the blog’s page to see various posts. Also see the section Recent Blog Posts in the sidebar of the blog or click on next near the bottom of a post in the blog. The blog also links to numerous free related resources.

About Ethics, Principles and Moral Values

Simply put, ethics involves learning what is right or wrong, and then doing the right thing — but the right thing is not nearly as straightforward as conveyed in a great deal of business ethics literature. Most ethical dilemmas in the workplace are not simply a matter of Should Bob steal from Jack? or Should Jack lie to his boss?

What is Business Ethics?

The concept has come to mean various things to various people, but generally it’s coming to know what it right or wrong in the workplace and doing what’s right — this is in regard to effects of products/services and in relationships with stakeholders. Wallace and Pekel explain that attention to business ethics is critical during times of fundamental change — times much like those faced now by businesses, both nonprofit or for-profit. In times of fundamental change, values that were previously taken for granted are now strongly questioned. Many of these values are no longer followed. Consequently, there is no clear moral compass to guide leaders through complex dilemmas about what is right or wrong. Attention to ethics in the workplace sensitizes leaders and staff to how they should act. Perhaps most important, attention to ethics in the workplaces helps ensure that when leaders and managers are struggling in times of crises and confusion, they retain a strong moral compass. However, attention to business ethics provides numerous other benefits, as well (these benefits are listed later in this document).

Note that many people react that business ethics, with its continuing attention to doing the right thing, only asserts the obvious ( be good, don’t lie, etc.), and so these people don’t take business ethics seriously. For many of us, these principles of the obvious can go right out the door during times of stress. Consequently, business ethics can be strong preventative medicine. Anyway, there are many other benefits of managing ethics in the workplace. These benefits are explained later in this document. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Managing Ethics in the Workplace

Managing Ethics Programs in the Workplace

Organizations can manage ethics in their workplaces by establishing an ethics management program. Brian Schrag, Executive Secretary of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, clarifies. Typically, ethics programs convey corporate values, often using codes and policies to guide decisions and behavior, and can include extensive training and evaluating, depending on the organization. They provide guidance in ethical dilemmas. Rarely are two programs alike.

All organizations have ethics programs, but most do not know that they do, wrote business ethics professor Stephen Brenner in the Journal of Business Ethics (1992, V11, pp. 391-399). A corporate ethics program is made up of values, policies and activities which impact the propriety of organization behaviors.

Bob Dunn, President and CEO of San Francisco-based Business for Social Responsibility, adds: Balancing competing values and reconciling them is a basic purpose of an ethics management program. Business people need more practical tools and information to understand their values and how to manage them. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Developing Codes of Ethics

According to Wallace, A credo generally describes the highest values to which the company aspires to operate. It contains the `thou shalts.’ A code of ethics specifies the ethical rules of operation. It’s the `thou shalt nots. In the latter 1980s, The Conference Board, a leading business membership organization, found that 76% of corporations surveyed had codes of ethics.

Some business ethicists disagree that codes have any value. Usually they explain that too much focus is put on the codes themselves, and that codes themselves are not influential in managing ethics in the workplace. Many ethicists note that it’s the developing and continuing dialogue around the code’s values that is most important. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Developing Codes of Conduct

If your organization is quite large, e.g. includes several large programs or departments, you may want to develop an overall corporate code of ethics and then a separate code to guide each of your programs or departments. Codes should not be developed out of the Human Resource or Legal departments alone, as is too often done. Codes are insufficient if intended only to ensure that policies are legal. All staff must see the ethics program being driven by top management.

Note that codes of ethics and codes of conduct may be the same in some organizations, depending on the organization’s culture and operations and on the ultimate level of specificity in the code(s). (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Resolving Ethical Dilemmas and Making Ethical Decisions

Perhaps too often, business ethics is portrayed as a matter of resolving conflicts in which one option appears to be the clear choice. For example, case studies are often presented in which an employee is faced with whether or not to lie, steal, cheat, abuse another, break terms of a contract, etc. However, ethical dilemmas faced by managers are often more real-to-life and highly complex with no clear guidelines, whether in law or often in religion.

As noted earlier in this document, Doug Wallace, Twin Cities-based consultant, explains that one knows when they have a significant ethical conflict when there is presence of a) significant value conflicts among differing interests, b) real alternatives that are equality justifiable, and c) significant consequences on stakeholders in the situation. An ethical dilemma exists when one is faced with having to make a choice among these alternatives.

Assessing and Cultivating Ethical Culture

Culture is comprised of the values, norms, folkways and behaviors of an organization. Ethics is about moral values, or values regarding right and wrong. Therefore, cultural assessments can be extremely valuable when assessing the moral values in an organization.

Ethics Training

The ethics program is essentially useless unless all staff members are trained about what it is, how it works and their roles in it. The nature of the system may invite suspicion if not handled openly and honestly. In addition, no matter how fair and up-to-date is a set of policies, the legal system will often interpret employee behavior (rather than written policies) as de facto policy. Therefore, all staff must be aware of and act in full accordance with policies and procedures (this is true, whether policies and procedures are for ethics programs or personnel management). This full accordance requires training about policies and procedures.

Some Contemporary (Arguably) Ethical Issues

General Resources Regarding Managing Ethics in the Workplace

Social Responsibility

Social responsibility and business ethics are often regarding as the same concepts. However, the social responsibility movement is but one aspect of the overall discipline of business ethics. The social responsibility movement arose particularly during the 1960s with increased public consciousness about the role of business in helping to cultivate and maintain highly ethical practices in society and particularly in the natural environment.

Boards and Corporate Social Responsibility

General Resources Regarding Social Responsibility

There are many online resources in regard to social responsibility. The following will help to get your started.

For the Category of Ethics:

To round out your knowledge of this Library topic, you may want to review some related topics, available from the link below. Each of the related topics includes free, online resources.

Also, scan the Recommended Books listed below. They have been selected for their relevance and highly practical nature.

Recommended Books

Business Ethics

The following books are recommended because of their highly practical nature and often because they include a wide range of information about this Library topic. To get more information about each book, just click on the image of the book. Also, a “bubble” of information might be displayed. You can click on the title of the book in that bubble to get more information, too.

Social Responsibility

The following books are recommended because of their highly practical nature and often because they include a wide range of information about this Library topic. To get more information about each book, just click on the image of the book. Also, a “bubble” of information might be displayed. You can click on the title of the book in that bubble to get more information, too.

Also see



Business Ethics and Social Responsibility #loan #for #small #business


#business ethics

#

Business Ethics and Social Responsibility

Also See the Library’s Blog Related to Ethics and Social Responsibility

In addition to the articles on this current page, also see the following blog that has posts related to Ethics and Social Responsibility. Scan down the blog’s page to see various posts. Also see the section Recent Blog Posts in the sidebar of the blog or click on next near the bottom of a post in the blog. The blog also links to numerous free related resources.

About Ethics, Principles and Moral Values

Simply put, ethics involves learning what is right or wrong, and then doing the right thing — but the right thing is not nearly as straightforward as conveyed in a great deal of business ethics literature. Most ethical dilemmas in the workplace are not simply a matter of Should Bob steal from Jack? or Should Jack lie to his boss?

What is Business Ethics?

The concept has come to mean various things to various people, but generally it’s coming to know what it right or wrong in the workplace and doing what’s right — this is in regard to effects of products/services and in relationships with stakeholders. Wallace and Pekel explain that attention to business ethics is critical during times of fundamental change — times much like those faced now by businesses, both nonprofit or for-profit. In times of fundamental change, values that were previously taken for granted are now strongly questioned. Many of these values are no longer followed. Consequently, there is no clear moral compass to guide leaders through complex dilemmas about what is right or wrong. Attention to ethics in the workplace sensitizes leaders and staff to how they should act. Perhaps most important, attention to ethics in the workplaces helps ensure that when leaders and managers are struggling in times of crises and confusion, they retain a strong moral compass. However, attention to business ethics provides numerous other benefits, as well (these benefits are listed later in this document).

Note that many people react that business ethics, with its continuing attention to doing the right thing, only asserts the obvious ( be good, don’t lie, etc.), and so these people don’t take business ethics seriously. For many of us, these principles of the obvious can go right out the door during times of stress. Consequently, business ethics can be strong preventative medicine. Anyway, there are many other benefits of managing ethics in the workplace. These benefits are explained later in this document. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Managing Ethics in the Workplace

Managing Ethics Programs in the Workplace

Organizations can manage ethics in their workplaces by establishing an ethics management program. Brian Schrag, Executive Secretary of the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, clarifies. Typically, ethics programs convey corporate values, often using codes and policies to guide decisions and behavior, and can include extensive training and evaluating, depending on the organization. They provide guidance in ethical dilemmas. Rarely are two programs alike.

All organizations have ethics programs, but most do not know that they do, wrote business ethics professor Stephen Brenner in the Journal of Business Ethics (1992, V11, pp. 391-399). A corporate ethics program is made up of values, policies and activities which impact the propriety of organization behaviors.

Bob Dunn, President and CEO of San Francisco-based Business for Social Responsibility, adds: Balancing competing values and reconciling them is a basic purpose of an ethics management program. Business people need more practical tools and information to understand their values and how to manage them. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Developing Codes of Ethics

According to Wallace, A credo generally describes the highest values to which the company aspires to operate. It contains the `thou shalts.’ A code of ethics specifies the ethical rules of operation. It’s the `thou shalt nots. In the latter 1980s, The Conference Board, a leading business membership organization, found that 76% of corporations surveyed had codes of ethics.

Some business ethicists disagree that codes have any value. Usually they explain that too much focus is put on the codes themselves, and that codes themselves are not influential in managing ethics in the workplace. Many ethicists note that it’s the developing and continuing dialogue around the code’s values that is most important. (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Developing Codes of Conduct

If your organization is quite large, e.g. includes several large programs or departments, you may want to develop an overall corporate code of ethics and then a separate code to guide each of your programs or departments. Codes should not be developed out of the Human Resource or Legal departments alone, as is too often done. Codes are insufficient if intended only to ensure that policies are legal. All staff must see the ethics program being driven by top management.

Note that codes of ethics and codes of conduct may be the same in some organizations, depending on the organization’s culture and operations and on the ultimate level of specificity in the code(s). (Extracted from Complete (Practical) Guide to Managing Ethics in the Workplace .)

Resolving Ethical Dilemmas and Making Ethical Decisions

Perhaps too often, business ethics is portrayed as a matter of resolving conflicts in which one option appears to be the clear choice. For example, case studies are often presented in which an employee is faced with whether or not to lie, steal, cheat, abuse another, break terms of a contract, etc. However, ethical dilemmas faced by managers are often more real-to-life and highly complex with no clear guidelines, whether in law or often in religion.

As noted earlier in this document, Doug Wallace, Twin Cities-based consultant, explains that one knows when they have a significant ethical conflict when there is presence of a) significant value conflicts among differing interests, b) real alternatives that are equality justifiable, and c) significant consequences on stakeholders in the situation. An ethical dilemma exists when one is faced with having to make a choice among these alternatives.

Assessing and Cultivating Ethical Culture

Culture is comprised of the values, norms, folkways and behaviors of an organization. Ethics is about moral values, or values regarding right and wrong. Therefore, cultural assessments can be extremely valuable when assessing the moral values in an organization.

Ethics Training

The ethics program is essentially useless unless all staff members are trained about what it is, how it works and their roles in it. The nature of the system may invite suspicion if not handled openly and honestly. In addition, no matter how fair and up-to-date is a set of policies, the legal system will often interpret employee behavior (rather than written policies) as de facto policy. Therefore, all staff must be aware of and act in full accordance with policies and procedures (this is true, whether policies and procedures are for ethics programs or personnel management). This full accordance requires training about policies and procedures.

Some Contemporary (Arguably) Ethical Issues

General Resources Regarding Managing Ethics in the Workplace

Social Responsibility

Social responsibility and business ethics are often regarding as the same concepts. However, the social responsibility movement is but one aspect of the overall discipline of business ethics. The social responsibility movement arose particularly during the 1960s with increased public consciousness about the role of business in helping to cultivate and maintain highly ethical practices in society and particularly in the natural environment.

Boards and Corporate Social Responsibility

General Resources Regarding Social Responsibility

There are many online resources in regard to social responsibility. The following will help to get your started.

For the Category of Ethics:

To round out your knowledge of this Library topic, you may want to review some related topics, available from the link below. Each of the related topics includes free, online resources.

Also, scan the Recommended Books listed below. They have been selected for their relevance and highly practical nature.

Recommended Books

Business Ethics

The following books are recommended because of their highly practical nature and often because they include a wide range of information about this Library topic. To get more information about each book, just click on the image of the book. Also, a “bubble” of information might be displayed. You can click on the title of the book in that bubble to get more information, too.

Social Responsibility

The following books are recommended because of their highly practical nature and often because they include a wide range of information about this Library topic. To get more information about each book, just click on the image of the book. Also, a “bubble” of information might be displayed. You can click on the title of the book in that bubble to get more information, too.

Also see



10 Ideas Driving The Future Of Social Entrepreneurship #local #business


#entrepreneur ideas

#

10 Ideas Driving The Future Of Social Entrepreneurship

The 10th Annual Skoll World Forum. which brought together several hundred of the world s leading social entrepreneurs to Oxford, has just wrapped for another year. The Forum serves as a useful barometer for how the climate of social enterprise is changing.

When it launched in 2004, it was all about celebrating the unknown social entrepreneurs, helping give them global recognition and credibility, and a platform to engage with policy leaders and large corporations.

In that task, it has succeeded brilliantly over the past decade, social enterprise has become mainstream. Jeff Skoll picks out the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus in 2006 as a watershed moment, followed equally significantly in the following year by the award to Al Gore.

How is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

So 10 years in, what s the current thinking? What new big idea now dominates the agenda and concerns of the Forum participants? And where do they think this field is going?

Broadcaster Ray Suarez expressed it eloquently when he said, Nobody ever comes out and says they are in favor of starving children, or inadequate sanitation, or war and conflict. And yet they persist. So how is it that if no-one is for these things, and everyone is against them, these problems continue?

Everyone at the Forum was in some way wrestling with that question. Whether it was this year s Skoll awardee Carne Ross, whose organization Independent Diplomat is seeking to turn the closed, rigged game of international diplomacy on its head, or Salman Khan s Khan Academy whose new model of free, online tuition is re-shaping how education is delivered, system change is the new game in town.

In Dare to Imagine, the film from the Forum s Opening Plenary, a theoretical physicist, a publisher, a neuroscientist, a technologist, a social financier, and a young science prodigy speculate on the next 50 years ahead. All agree on one thing that the old, incremental way of tackling problems won t work anymore; that we need to radically imagine new ways of coming together to deal with the accelerating world of change. But the film is also profoundly optimistic never before have we had so many ideas and tools to help us cope with this change.

Who better to address this issue than Ashoka (where I work) founder Bill Drayton, the man who was among the first to set out the very concept of social entrepreneur ? Drayton outlined to a packed room his view on what Ashoka considers the next big idea in moving the field what he calls Framework Change, In Drayton s view, to fix our broken systems, we need to accelerate the number of changemakers in the world, and ultimately get to a world in which everyone is a changemaker. That message really seemed to resonate at this year s Forum.

A significant number of discussions highlighted the vital role of young people. Bill Drayton estimates that about 700 of the 3,000 social entrepreneurs in the Ashoka network work directly with youth in some way ,and that helping young people develop the life skills to flourish in this new world is critical to solving the problems we re facing. In particular, helping a child master cognitive empathy was cited by Drayton and others as a foundation skill that could set up a child for life, and speakers such as Taddy Blecher of CIDA and Sandy Speicher of Ideo showed how such models are working in India, South Africa, Peru and around the world.

In this year s Forum, I sensed a strong undercurrent of feeling that scaling impact need not be the same thing as scaling the organisation. Partnerships, franchising, scaling through influence and encouraging imitation: These were all strong themes that emerged in many conversations. Whether this was a response to a reduced funding environment or a strategic choice based on new more effective ways of delivering impact, there was real optimism about the new models emerging. I saw dozens of deals and partnerships being brokered around me. I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology, says Willie Foote, CEO of Root Capital. And he should know from a tiny start-up only a few years ago, Root Capital has now mobilized over $500 million to support farmers in developing countries. If pathological collaboration is Foote s mantra, I say amen.

I believe in collaborating to the point of pathology.

It s always fun to talk about tech, but this year tech was at the heart of conversations on disrupting systems. Whether on how apps helped monitor human rights in the Arab Spring, to discussions on how mobile phone technology is transforming financial services in Africa and insights on tech disruptions in education caused by new models such as Khan Academy. Premal Shah spoke about how Kiva is seeing loans coming from emerging markets into the U.S. defying our assumptions on the traditional north/south relationship. The democratizing power of tech, and ability to impact political situations such as the Arab Spring, was also highlighted, which bring us to

There was a universal agreement that empowering people as far down the chain as possible is key to the system change that we are witnessing. Whether this is was through technology giving people unprecedented access to real-time information, to apps that can transform anyone into a blogger or journalist orcommentator, the days of the few commanding the many (even if those few are brilliant, enlightened social entrepreneurs) is coming to an end. There was a rising view that lean, flexible, teams are going to eat the lunch of the old dinosaurs, and that s as true for NGOs and social enterprises as it is for corporations.

Are NGO, the corporation, and the government agency reaching the end of their shelf life in their current form? Sarah Severn from Nike spoke about integrating sustainability into the DNA of the business, and Maura O Neill, Chief Innovation Officer of USAID spoke about re-engineering the aid model in language any corporate CEO would recognize. It s getting hard to tell who was the NGO and who was the corporate leader. And that s a great thing.

The Forum has always brought together leading social entrepreneurs in conversation with corporate and political partners. But this year I glimpsed the emergence of a new beast prowling the halls: the self-identified social intrapreneur. the change maker who is working within an organization or the political system. From pioneering executives such as Gib Bulloch at Accenture Development Partners to his counterparts at Unilever, Mckinsey, and many other firms, these individuals are creatively finding ways to turn their own organizations into change agents. And it s clear that they are warmly welcomed by the social entrepreneurs we need change agents within large corporations as well as outside. Will there one day be a Skoll World Forum on Social Intrapreneurship? For my part, I hope that soon people won t even notice the difference.

As the Forum passes its tenth year, many leaders of the social enterprise movement are approaching or into their 70s or older. A poignant moment occurred during a panel discussion when Bill Strickland, Paul Farmer and former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, titans of this movement, were asked about succession planning and how they saw legacy. Interesting, all answered that they found saw their legacy in teaching, mentoring, and inspiring others. One torch can light many fires was a common theme. And the fire doesn t have to be spread just within the organization none of them saw succession planning as simply being to find someone to step into their immediate role.

A 10 year anniversary is a great moment to look back, take stock, and then imagine the future. The field of social entrepreneurship has blossomed since the Forum launched and the ideas which a decade ago seemed so radical are now the norm in campuses and boardrooms across the world. If this Forum is anything to go by, the next 10 years are going to be even more disruptive and exciting than the last.



10 Alternative Social Networks for Business Professionals #start #up #business #grants


#business networking sites

#

10 Alternative Social Networks for Business Professionals

BranchOut debuted in 2010 on Facebook as a free application for professional social networking and job searching. Today, it’s Facebook’s largest application dedicated to the cause, the company says.

Once you add the BranchOut app to your Facebook account, you fill out a professional profile with your specialties, a summary of your work, a photo and a list of your skills. You can also ask for “endorsements”—or recommendations—and add Facebook friends you want to connect with on a professional level. You can also search for jobs and people from within the app.

Spiceworks is a free website for IT professionals to learn about and get advice on technology directly from the vendors that provide it. With a user base of 2 million, members can ask questions in forums and connect, as well as take advantage of its network management and help desk applications.

Biznik brands itself as “an online networking community for independent business people to gather, share resources, referrals and support.” The site caters to independent businesses and entrepreneurs.

Biznik communities are based on location, and you can find members based on career category. Features include profiles, video, blogs, messaging, events and more. Biznik offers three tiers of memberships: Basic ($79/year), Pro ($14/month) and Pro VIP ($29/month).

GadBall says its mission is to “help you develop and enhance your career,” and it offers a number of unique features to help you achieve that: a profile writing wizard, profile review and score, proof reading, career videos, resume templates and more.

GadBall, which is free and has more than 600,000 members, also has a number of the more traditional social networking features, such as recommendations, profiles, job search and groups.

EFactor, which is free to join, is a social network for entrepreneurs, mentors and investors that has more than 1 million members, according to its site. The social network focuses on connecting entrepreneurs with experts, potential partners and clients, as well as finding employment and funding for startups.

PROskore is a free business network that measures your professional reputation based on your influence and experience in such areas as social media, your professional history and peer validation. PROskore then uses these scores to help you find new business opportunities and connect with other members in the network.

BeKnown is a professional networking app for Facebook developed by job search site Monster.com.

Once you download the app. you can invite Facebook connections to join, fill out your profile, ask for recommendations and search jobs. BeKnown also awards you badges based on your work history, education, size and composition of your network and other actions, which appear on your BeKnown profile.

StartupNation calls itself a “free service founded by entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs.” The site is smaller in size compared to many social networking sites and has 120,000 members in the U.S.

Aside from its networking features, StartupNation offers step-by-step advice columns; small business and entrepreneur forums; local, interest and professional groups; expert blogs; podcasts; contests and more.

Free professional social network Ziggs has a host of features, including polls, chat, public and private groups, questions, people search, messaging, profiles and more. Ziggs also offers a service called “Search Alerts,” which lets you pinpoint where in the world your profile has been viewed, the search engine it was viewed from, keywords used to find you and at what time they viewed your profile.

Professional social network Ryze, which has 600,000 users, offers both free and paid memberships. Want to sign up? You’ll need to apply for a membership—it is currently approving one free and one “gold” membership a day.

Ryze’s features include profiles, messaging, groups related to your industry, interests and location. The gold membership, which costs $9.95/month, lets you perform advanced searches and contact distant potential connections directly.



What are business ethics? Business ethics and corporate social responsibility – Anglo

#business ethics

#

Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
An Anglo American case study

Page 2: What are business ethics?

Business ethics are moral principles that guide the way a business behaves. The same principles that determine an individual s actions also apply to business.

Acting in an ethical way involves distinguishing between right and wrong and then making the right choice. It is relatively easy to identify unethical business practices. For example, companies should not use child labour. They should not unlawfully use copyrighted materials and processes. They should not engage in bribery.

However, it is not always easy to create similar hard-and-fast definitions of good ethical practice. A company must make a competitive return for its shareholders and treat its employees fairly. A company also has wider responsibilities. It should minimise any harm to the environment and work in ways that do not damage the communities in which it operates. This is known as corporate social responsibility.

Codes of behaviour

The law is the key starting point for any business. Most leading businesses also have their own statement of Business Principles which set out their core values and standards. In Anglo American s case, this is called Good Citizenship .

A business should also follow relevant codes of practice that cover its sector. Many companies have created voluntary codes of practice that regulate practices in their industrial sector. These are often drawn up in consultation with governments, employees, local communities and other stakeholders. Anglo American has played an active part in initiatives such as the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative.

Anglo American has also contributed to the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights. This code sets out principles and practices for ensuring that a company s need to ensure the security of its employees and operations in volatile countries does not adversely impact upon the local population. Thus the Principles provide guidance on how both private and public security forces assigned to protect a mining operation or an oil and gas facility should be vetted, trained in human rights, monitored and controlled.

Anglo American also aims to ensure that it plays a role in protecting the human rights of its employees and local people in countries in which it operates. The company supports the principles set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

All companies need to make a profit. However, Anglo American recognises that this objective must take account of ethics as shown in its statement on corporate responsibility: Though providing strong returns for our shareholders remains our prime objective, we do not believe that these can or should be achieved at the expense of social, environmental and moral considerations. Indeed a long-term business such as ours will only thrive if it also takes into account the needs of other stakeholders such as governments, employees, suppliers, communities and customers.

Stakeholders

An important process used by Anglo American is that of stakeholder engagement. This enables it better to understand the perspectives and priorities of external groups that are affected by its activities and to factor them into its decision-making processes. To support this work at a local level, Anglo American has developed a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox or SEAT process.

This toolbox helps managers to measure the impact of activities on the company and communities. It also helps to improve a mine s contribution to development through, for example, using its supply chain needs to generate new businesses or to improve the water or electricity infrastructure. They use this toolbox to engage with stakeholders including community representatives.

Sometimes communities have to be resettled, with government sanction, in order for important mineral deposits to be accessed. This can cause controversy and divisions in the communities concerned. International best practice sets out a number of key stages in such a process including the need for structured consultation, fair compensation and the importance of restoring and enhancing the livelihoods of people in their new locations.

Recently Anglo American has had to undertake two such relocations in South Africa at the villages of Ga Pila and Motlhotlo. These were undertaken with the support of the provincial government and local tribal leadership and after consultation with local people lasting for several years leading to agreement with each householder. New villages have been built with better houses and infrastructure and more land for farming. The relocation programme was voluntary. The relocation programme at Motlhotlo is still under way but at Ga Pila 98% of those living in the old village took up the offer to move to the new village.

Anglo American | Business ethics and corporate social responsibility



Health & Social Care Courses #health #and #social #care #courses #online,health #and

#

Health & Social Care Courses

Online courses in health and social care.�Whatever area of Social care you are interested in pursuing the UK Open College can help you gain the required skills and qualifications. A range of QCF,�health and social care courses online to study from home at your own pace in your own time. Enrol any time of the year and complete as quickly as you want to without any restrictions.�

All of our health and social care courses come with unlimited support and materials provided giving students full peace of mind. All of our Social Care courses carry fully accredited and recognised certification.

Health and social Care courses right from the very basics through to advanced, feel free to take your pick and choose whether to enrol and make payment online or call our office on 0121 288 0181 and our admin team will take your details and payment for you.

HEALTH SOCIAL CARE TASTER COURSE Looking to qualify in Health Social Care? Not sure if it is the role for you? Been a long time since you.

NCFE Level 2 Preparing to work in adult social care Course. This nationally accredited home study qualification is aimed at students looking to.

NCFE Level 3 Preparing to work in adult social care Course. This home learning course is designed to aid students working in, or looking to work.

Online Health and Social Care diploma Course. This nationally recognised, QCF listed qualification is designed to increase the professional.

This nationally recognised, QCF listed Diploma in Health Social Care home study course is designed to be studied independently or as a.

Aspergers Syndrome Awareness distance learning course: This course has been developed for anyone interested in understanding Aspergers Syndrome and.

Autism Awareness home learning course. Aimed at students looking to develop their awareness of autism when working with autistic individuals. As.

Deaf Awareness home learning course: This course provides students with a general intro to deafness. Developed to provide information .



A Letter From Your Doctor About Your Claim For Social Security Disability

#

A Letter From Your Doctor About Your Claim For Social Security Disability Benefits-
Physical Impairments

When you apply for Social Security disability benefits and/or Supplemental Security Income disability benefits, the Social Security Administration will, of course, want copies of all of your medical records. You may also want to have your doctor write a letter specifically for the Social Security Administration regarding your application for Social Security disability benefits. If you choose to have your doctor write such a letter, here is the kind of information that will help increase your chances of qualifying for Social Security disability benefits.

First of all, make sure your name and Social Security number are clearly marked on the letter from your doctor regarding your Social Security disability benefits. Every week when I was a disability determination specialist, the office where I worked would receive copies of medical records in which the identity of the person applying for Social Security disability benefits could not be determined. Medical records that never make it to your file will not help you application for Social Security disability benefits. Anything you send to the Social Security Administration regarding your application for Social Security disability benefits should always have your name and Social Security number clearly marked on it.

When you apply for Social Security disability benefits, the Social Security Administration will want copies of all of your medical records; therefore, your doctor does not need to spend a lot of time repeating information that is already contained in your records. (See What Medical Records Should You Submit When You Apply for Disability Benefits ?) A simple statement such as this at the beginning of the letter will suffice:

�Ms. Johnson suffers from rheumatoid arthritis. I have enclosed copies of all of her medical records including copies of all testing and treatment notes.�

Many people submit letters from their doctors that make statements such as �Mr. Smith is permanently, totally disabled� or �Ms. Jones is unable to do any type of work.� Although such statements do not hurt your application for Social Security disability benefits, they do not help your case for Social Security disability benefits either. Just because your doctor states that you are disabled does not mean that the Social Security Administration will agree. Doctors vary greatly in their ideas about how severe an impairment has to be in order to be disabling. The Social Security Administration will make its own decision as to whether you qualify for Social Security disability benefits based on its own laws and regulations.

The information that will most help your case for Social Security disability benefits and/or Supplemental Security Income disability benefits is a statement of your doctor�s opinion about how your condition limits your ability to do work-related functions. (See How Your Condition Affects Your Ability to Function: The Key to Disability Benefits .) The Social Security Administration calls this a medical source statement (MSS). The MSS carries special weight with the Social Security Administration. The physical work-related functions that the Social Security Administration is concerned with are:
security disability, social security disability, social security disability, social security disability, social security disability, social security disability, social

� The weight you can frequently lift and carry

� The weight you can occasionally lift and carry

� How many hours you can stand and walk out of an 8 hour day

� How many hours you can sit out of an 8 hour day

� Your ability to push and pull hand and foot controls

� Reaching all directions including overhead

� Handling (gross manipulation)

� Fingering (fine manipulation)

� Feeling (skin receptors)

� Vision-field of vision

� Environmental limitations-extreme cold

� Environmental limitations-extreme heat

� Environmental limitations-fumes, odors, dust, gases, poor ventilation, etc.

� Environmental limitations-hazards (heights and machinery)

security disability, social security disability, social security disability, social

When writing a letter regarding your application for Social Security disability benefits, your doctor should be very specific about how your condition limits you work-related activities. An example of a good MSS is:

�Because of the pain and limited range of motion due to rheumatoid arthritis, Ms. Johnson is unable to lift more than 10 pounds on an occasional basis and 5 pounds on a frequent basis. She can stand and walk less than two hours out of an eight hour day. She is limited to occasional stooping. Because her grip strength is only 2 out of 5, she has limited gross manipulation. For example, she is unable to use a hammer. She is unable to oppose her thumb to her index finger; therefore, her fine manipulation is limited. She is unable to fasten buttons or zippers. Because of limited range of motion in her shoulders, she is unable to reach overhead.�

The Social Security Administration will usually accept whatever limitations that the treating physician says the disability claimant has as long as the limitations are reasonable. A detailed statement from your doctor about your functional limitations can make a big difference in the outcome of your claim for Social Security disability benefits.



Roles of a Social Worker – Social Work – Chadron State College

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Social Work

Roles of a Social Worker

Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do, but how much love we put into the action that we do. Mother Teresa

most of us have a pretty good idea of what we what we expect from a doctor or a teacher. For social work, the role expectations are not quite as clearly understood by the general public. Perhaps this is because there are so many professional roles in social work. The number and diversity of social work roles provide opportunity for a great deal of creativity in practice.
Suppes, M. Cressey Wells, C. (2003)

Some of the many professional roles in Social Work are

Broker

The social worker is involved in the process of making referrals to link a family or person to needed resources. Social work professionals do not simply provide information. They also follow up to be sure the needed resources are attained. This requires knowing resources, eligibility requirements, fees and the location of services.

Advocate

In this role, social workers fight for the rights of others and work to obtain needed resources by convincing others of the legitimate needs and rights of members of society. Social workers are particularly concerned for those who are vulnerable or are unable to speak up for themselves. Advocacy can occur on the local, county, state or national level. Some social workers are involved in international human rights and advocacy for those in need.

Case Manager

Case managers are involved in locating services and assisting their clients to access those services. Case management is especially important for complex situations and for those who are homeless or elderly, have chronic physical or mental health issues, are disabled, victims of domestic or other violent crimes, or are vulnerable children.

Educator

Social Workers are often involved in teaching people about resources and how to develop particular skills such as budgeting, the caring discipline of children, effective communication, the meaning of a medical diagnosis, and the prevention of violence.

Facilitator

In this role, social workers are involved in gathering groups of people together for a variety of purposes including community development, self advocacy, political organization, and policy change. Social workers are involved as group therapists and task group leaders.

Organizer

Social Workers are involved in many levels of community organization and action including economic development, union organization, and research and policy specialists.

Manager

Social Workers, because of their expertise in a wide variety of applications, are well suited to work as managers and supervisors in almost any setting. As managers, they are better able to influence policy change and/or development, and to advocate, on a larger scale, for all underprivileged people.

Social Worker: A professional YOU can be proud to be!



GCSS – Georgia Council for the Social Studies, council on social work

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Updates

11/04/16

Council on social work education

The Photos for the 2016 Annual Conference are now Online.

09/02/16

Council on social work education

09/02/16

Council on social work education

08/24/16

News Notes, Vol. 43, No. 1, 2016 (August) is Now available for download

09/09/15

News Notes, Vol. 42, No. 1, 2015 is Now available for download

12/17/13

Check out our new Photo Gallery by Clicking Here

Articles

Georgia Council for the Social Studies Annual Conference Keynote Speaker Mr. John Stokes of Brown vs Board of Education

Council on social work education

Mr. John Stokes, original plaintiff Brown vs Board of Education will present a panel discussion with GCSS member, Dr. Lois Wolfe (pictured) along with Dr. Herman Viola curator emeritus, Smithsonian Institution on Thursday, October 12 .

The Georgia Social Studies Journal

Council on social work education

The Georgia Social Studies Journal is under new editorship In the days ahead, the journal will assume a new vision, new scope, and new look! Our goal: TIMELY RELEVANT ENGAGING!

Please consider submitting a story about a powerful teaching moment, a reflection about a current issue facing social studies teachers, results of an action research project, or a review of a resource you have found exceptionally useful in your practice.

The Georgia Social Studies Journal is an internationally recognized, peer-reviewed online journal that aims to foster critical discussion of teaching and learning in PK-16 social studies. We understand social studies to include various disciplinary strands (history, economics, geography, political science) as well as social education (learning about self in relation to others in communities large and small). We invite three types of submissions: Inquiries, Reflections, and Tools. We will also have exciting new features such as Community Voices and Students Speak Up. Stay tuned!

Visit our new and evolving website:

Please contact us with ideas you have Inaugural issue coming October, 2016!

Jenn James, Editor ([email protected])

Liz Saylor, Editor ([email protected])

2015 Annual Conference

Council on social work education

Retiring GCSS Conference Coordinator Diane Sloan recognized by the Classic Center and GCSS for 11 years of outstanding service.

Congressman John Lewis Keynote at Fall Conference

Council on social work education

The 2014 GCSS Fall Conference was special for several reasons. First, this is the 50 th anniversary of the GCSS conference. Second, a large number of teachers from all across Georgia participated in over 100 concurrent sessions as well as visited the exhibit hall filled with social studies resources. Third, several teachers and leaders were recognized for their outstanding work in the area of social studies education. (Photos of award winners are posted at Awards on our website.) Last but not least, our very special guest speaker was Congressman John Lewis and his aide and co-author, Andrew Aydin. Congressman Lewis talked about his role in the civil rights movement and also how that experience led him to write the graphic novel March . Congressman John Lewis was presented the 2014 GCSS Statesman Award the first since 2004 when Representative Louise McBee of Athens received the award.

Photo: Andrew Aydin, co-author of March, Congressman John Lewis, and GCSS President Tammy Ponder.

Council on social work education

2017 Annual Conference

Council on social work education



Wyoming County – Trehab Center – Montrose, PA – Social Services –

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Trehab Center

Trehab Center – Employment & Job Training – Learning Centers – Wyoming County in Montrose, PA – Susquehanna County is a business listed in the categories Social Services & Welfare, Additional Educational Opportunities, Educational Facilities, Educational Support Services, Other Individual And Family Services, Schools And Educational Services, Nec, Individual And Family Social Services, Educational & Learning Centers and Social & Human Services Organizations. If you did business with Trehab Center, please leave a review and help us improve and help other people. Also, don’t forget to mention Hubbiz.

Social Services Welfare, Additional Educational Opportunities, Educational Facilities, Educational Support Services, Other Individual and Family Services, Schools and Educational Services, Nec, Individual and Family Social Services, Educational Learning Centers, Social Human Services Organizations

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