Tag : Tips

The Telegraph Festival of Business, business tips.#Business #tips


Festival of Business

Business tips Business tips

Business tips Business tips Business tips Business tips

The Telegraph Festival of Business 2017

The seventh Festival of Business will take place in London on Tuesday 7 November, 2017. This one day conference, regularly attracting an audience of 600 senior executives from UK businesses, will bring together some of the best-known names in British business, along with leading politicians and thought leaders, in a bid to ensure the continued growth of Britain’s small businesses. A combination of keynote addresses, live interviews, case studies, expert panels, quick-fire talks, and masterclasses will ensure attendees leave the conference having found inspiration, heard pioneering examples of business development and cemented valuable relationships with their peers.

Agenda

Registration and Breakfast

Welcome Address from the Chairman

Jeremy Warner, Associate Editor, The Telegraph

Lady Michelle Mone, Baroness of Mayfair OBE

Panel Session: Talent: attracting, recruiting and retaining your most valuable asset

Understand how important your company’s values are for recruitment and learn how to encourage millennials through to Gen X to join and then get them to stay. Gain insights into competing with larger companies when it comes to salary, culture and apprenticeships and delve further into the complexities of employment regulation.

Craig Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Bank

Karen Blackett, OBE Chairwoman, MediaCom UK

Kiera Lawlor, Head of Happiness, Social Chain

Kirstin Furber, People Director, BBC Worldwide

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Panel Session: Leading your business to success

Hear first hand on how to lead through change and how to successfully delegate. Gain insights into day-to-day management tips and understand the key lessons learnt by overcoming failure.

James Daunt, Chief Executive Officer, Waterstones

Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, money.co.uk

Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing, Legal General Investment Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

Networking and Refreshment Break

Quick-fire Talk: Cyber security – how to prevent the worst from happening

Senior Representative, National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

Q A: Late Payments: can common ground be found?

A discussion that speaks to both sides, is honest about what the issues are at both ends and is constructive in terms of solutions.

Richard Gilkes, Managing Director, Stort Chemical

Philip King, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Credit Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

The importance of growth and international trade for SMEs

The Rt Hon Dr. Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for International Trade

Plotting the future of tech innovation in your business

The new tech landscape; identify fads vs genuinely useful future tech and investing wisely to make the best tech choices. Gain insights into the importance of company-wide adoption and understanding and recruiting the relevant talent to deal with changing tech and transformation.

Chief Digital Officer

Digital Marketing Lead, UK

Pfizer Innovative Health

Moderator: Robert Bridge

Chief Customer Officer

Scaling Up Your Business Operations

Gain insights and advice on whether it’s best to scale through partnerships or organically. Understand how to ensure optimal staffing when growing and how to know when to step back.

Head of Enterprise

Business Banking NatWest/RBS

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive and Co-founder

Moderator: Matt Caines

Editor, Telegraph Connect

Supporting UK business to export and grow

Which will be the new frontiers? Identifying the changes to consider following Brexit and understand cross cultural business differences. Examine the steps to take when starting to export.

Emma Jones, Founder, Enterprise Nation

Joshua Stevens, Chief Executive Officer, One Retail Group

Dr Adam Marshall, Director General, British Chambers of Commerce

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Securing your business against cyber threats

Cyber security; an issue not to be taken lightly and potentially one of the the biggest threats facing SMEs today. Understand how to achieve a cyber security 101 strategy and the preventative measures you can take and what to do when disaster strikes.

Sam Nixon, Product Owner, Decoded

Phil Lander, Director of Mobile and IT, B2B, Samsung Europe

Rowan Davies, Head of Policy and Campaigns, Mumsnet

Moderator: Stephan Freeman, Chief Information Security Officer, The Telegraph



The Telegraph Festival of Business, business tips.#Business #tips


Festival of Business

Business tips Business tips

Business tips Business tips Business tips Business tips

The Telegraph Festival of Business 2017

The seventh Festival of Business will take place in London on Tuesday 7 November, 2017. This one day conference, regularly attracting an audience of 600 senior executives from UK businesses, will bring together some of the best-known names in British business, along with leading politicians and thought leaders, in a bid to ensure the continued growth of Britain’s small businesses. A combination of keynote addresses, live interviews, case studies, expert panels, quick-fire talks, and masterclasses will ensure attendees leave the conference having found inspiration, heard pioneering examples of business development and cemented valuable relationships with their peers.

Agenda

Registration and Breakfast

Welcome Address from the Chairman

Jeremy Warner, Associate Editor, The Telegraph

Lady Michelle Mone, Baroness of Mayfair OBE

Panel Session: Talent: attracting, recruiting and retaining your most valuable asset

Understand how important your company’s values are for recruitment and learn how to encourage millennials through to Gen X to join and then get them to stay. Gain insights into competing with larger companies when it comes to salary, culture and apprenticeships and delve further into the complexities of employment regulation.

Craig Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, Metro Bank

Karen Blackett, OBE Chairwoman, MediaCom UK

Kiera Lawlor, Head of Happiness, Social Chain

Kirstin Furber, People Director, BBC Worldwide

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Panel Session: Leading your business to success

Hear first hand on how to lead through change and how to successfully delegate. Gain insights into day-to-day management tips and understand the key lessons learnt by overcoming failure.

James Daunt, Chief Executive Officer, Waterstones

Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, money.co.uk

Helena Morrissey, Head of Personal Investing, Legal General Investment Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

Networking and Refreshment Break

Quick-fire Talk: Cyber security – how to prevent the worst from happening

Senior Representative, National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC)

Q A: Late Payments: can common ground be found?

A discussion that speaks to both sides, is honest about what the issues are at both ends and is constructive in terms of solutions.

Richard Gilkes, Managing Director, Stort Chemical

Philip King, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Credit Management

Moderator: Liam Halligan, Economics Commentator, The Telegraph

The importance of growth and international trade for SMEs

The Rt Hon Dr. Liam Fox MP, Secretary of State for International Trade

Plotting the future of tech innovation in your business

The new tech landscape; identify fads vs genuinely useful future tech and investing wisely to make the best tech choices. Gain insights into the importance of company-wide adoption and understanding and recruiting the relevant talent to deal with changing tech and transformation.

Chief Digital Officer

Digital Marketing Lead, UK

Pfizer Innovative Health

Moderator: Robert Bridge

Chief Customer Officer

Scaling Up Your Business Operations

Gain insights and advice on whether it’s best to scale through partnerships or organically. Understand how to ensure optimal staffing when growing and how to know when to step back.

Head of Enterprise

Business Banking NatWest/RBS

Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive and Co-founder

Moderator: Matt Caines

Editor, Telegraph Connect

Supporting UK business to export and grow

Which will be the new frontiers? Identifying the changes to consider following Brexit and understand cross cultural business differences. Examine the steps to take when starting to export.

Emma Jones, Founder, Enterprise Nation

Joshua Stevens, Chief Executive Officer, One Retail Group

Dr Adam Marshall, Director General, British Chambers of Commerce

Moderator: Rebecca Burn-Callander, Contributor, The Telegraph

Securing your business against cyber threats

Cyber security; an issue not to be taken lightly and potentially one of the the biggest threats facing SMEs today. Understand how to achieve a cyber security 101 strategy and the preventative measures you can take and what to do when disaster strikes.

Sam Nixon, Product Owner, Decoded

Phil Lander, Director of Mobile and IT, B2B, Samsung Europe

Rowan Davies, Head of Policy and Campaigns, Mumsnet

Moderator: Stephan Freeman, Chief Information Security Officer, The Telegraph



Top business tips for 2016 – BBC News #home #based #business #opportunities


#business tips

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Top business tips for 2016

As 2016 arrives, business leaders around the world are now focusing intently on their aims and challenges for the next 12 months.

From implementing plans to further grow their companies, to dealing with the likely problems that will need to be overcome, this is the time of year when forward planning is the centre of attention.

Here some of the best business leaders – and rock music legends – profiled in 2015 for the BBC’s The Boss slot share their thoughts on running or setting up a business in 2016.

Dumi Oburota, manager of rapper Tinie Tempah

Image copyright Dumi Oburota

Have a clear objective. Understand the DNA of your business.

What you put in is what you get out. Do not take “no” or “can’t” as an answer.

Socialise and network within your industry.

Gene Simmons, bassist and the business brain of rock band Kiss

Image copyright Getty Images

Get rid of all your loser friends. You know the ones – they drink too much, they get high. And like vampires they will suck the life blood out of you.

That may not leave you with very many friends, but… in business your friends will not be much help.

You’re too young and not rich enough to take vacations. Work, it’s a good word.

Janine Allis, founder of global fruit juice bar chain Boost Juice

Image copyright Boost Juice

There are many reasons people get into business. For me it was creative pursuit, and being a creator of my own destiny.

You need to build your business the right way for the right reasons. If it is just for the money then you will only have a business short term.

New companies are hungry for cash, so anything you are making will go straight back into the business. And often the founder, who is working 120 hours a week, is the last person to see any returns for a long time from their hard yards.

Yet these are the businesses that succeed, and in the long run are the ones that are truly successful. By contrast, firms that are stripped of their cash to “fund” the lifestyle of their owners are very short-lived.

Building a business on passion and hard work, and surrounding yourself with great people, is the recipe for success.

Jacqueline Gold, chief executive of Ann Summers

Image copyright Jacqueline Gold

Be digitally minded – digital is a vital part of any business now, and it goes beyond just having a good website and being on social media.

Consumers want a digital experience across all elements of any business they engage with, and they want it to be seamless.

Diversify – think about how your business can grow and diversify in to new areas, but always ensure these new areas reflect your customer demographic.

I always look for new ways to evolve the brand, and in early 2016 we will be launching Rabbit, our own dating app.

Listen – this is a tip that’s relevant every year, never stop listening to your customers. They are the most vital source of information and their feedback is invaluable.

Alex Cheatle, co-founder of concierge business Ten Group

When leading your business, focus on what makes you different – not what is generic.

This allows your team, customers and suppliers to all “buy in” to why your business matters, and why it is worth joining, and staying and working with.

It also means that everyone is better focused on your competitive advantage and unique proposition.

Talk about what makes your business what it is.

Deb Weidenhamer, founder of American Auction Company

Image copyright Deb Weidenhamer

Collective wisdom says that goal-setting, planning and managing your time wisely are critical for success.

However, there is a secret formula to achieving objectives that is widely overlooked – do what you dread first!

Tackle the task, have the conversation, do the mundane that you least want to do at the beginning of your day.

It takes incredible discipline to start with the unexciting, but when you complete the task, you avoid using psychic energy towards fretting about what you’re avoiding.

You will open yourself up to more inspiration and imagination and find more time to accomplish greatness.

Oisin Hanrahan, founder of cleaning and maintenance service Handy

Image copyright Handy

In business, no two weeks are ever the same, but if your company has been in existence for a year or more, then analyse and learn from the previous 12 months.

Identify the surge periods and the quiet moments, and make sure that you have the proper staffing levels in place, as well as being ready to pre-empt problems and capitalise upon perennial opportunities.

As they grow, far too many businesses become rigidly hierarchical – the distance growing between senior management and the staff on the frontline.

Beyond the obvious fact that layers of bureaucracy are an enemy to innovation, listening to all staff members, irrespective of their position, is crucial. Not only does such engagement prove good for morale, but the insights that staff can offer could be the thing that changes your business for the better.

Having landed a big contract or launched a new service, it is entirely understandable that maintaining this new workload becomes a priority for a business. However, it should not do so to the complete detriment of maintaining company growth.

Keep on implementing new business strategies and growth plans at all times. It may seem an obvious point to make, but so many companies become wholly dependent on one big client or project that they suddenly find themselves in deep trouble should they lose the work.

David Spencer-Percival, founder of recruitment firm Spencer Ogden

Image copyright David Spencer-Percival

Setting up your own business requires enormous focus, drive and ambition, coupled with an incredibly hard work ethic.

You need funding, and you need relentless energy. Charm and wit help.

You also need to have a decent pair of rose tinted glasses to hand as if you knew all the pitfalls before you started you probably wouldn’t do it.

But my one piece of advise is that outside legal and finance issues – don’t listen to anyone, don’t read business books, and do things your own way.

Technology and new ideas are changing the world faster than people can become experts in it. Don’t follow the crowd – think for yourself, be different and break the mould.

Nirmal Sethia, founder of Newby Teas

Image copyright Ed Miller

The most important things when starting a business are – don’t lie, don’t pretend, and don’t mislead your executives and the masses. And be passionate about the mission, have an innovative mind, and be totally honest in implementing your vision.

Hiring the best team is a matter of luck. Bosses must keep their eyes open not to allow politics, dishonesty and indiscipline. Anybody who gets involved with these three, should be sent home immediately. In my experience, referrals are the best source of fine personnel.

How long does it take for positive returns? Management is about making things happen, managing changes.

If the vision is innovative and supported by all requisites, i.e. finances, production planning, and strong administration, then success needs short gestation.

Innovation is not only required for product, but also for administrative and financial systems. Slow progress can be tolerated, but negativity beyond a short space of time – in spite of the excellent management team – should indicate the time is ready to pull the plug.

There ought to be constant innovation in both product, resources and management. Without personal commitment and understanding of people’s psyche, the best can fail. A successful entrepreneur needs divine grace, commitment to the cause, discipline and courage.

Gary Grant, the founder of toy shop chain The Entertainer

Image copyright Emma Hollings Photography Image caption The Entertainer gives 10% of its profits to charity, mainly child-related ones. “We earn our money from family and children and therefore we give back to family and children,” he says.

Entrepreneurs have a different level of risk taking.

In life we all have a risk threshold. There are people for whom not having secured their regular monthly salary cheque is daunting.

You have to believe in yourself, and then you have just got to go for it.

Depending on where you are on the risk register separates the very calculated “I need to know all the answers” type of person, from the ‘I’ve got a good gut feel about this, I’m just going to give it a go’ person. To be honest, the later one is the kind of person I am. I’ll have a go.

I don’t take on unnecessary risk. But if you want dead certs they don’t come your way. They don’t exist.

Mark Constantine, founder of toiletries and cosmetics firm Lush

Reconsider your marketing. If your marketing is the same as others in your sector, you’re doing it wrong.

Make sure that your customer can work out the value for money. If they can’t, you don’t deserve to retain them.

Think of different things you can do with your business that are not just about making money.



25 Free Low Cost Advertising Tips by Small Business Expert Tom Egelhoff

#business advertising

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25 Free Low Cost Advertising Tips

by Tom Egelhoff

(Tom’s FREE Podcast for this topic is available. – For More Info Click Here)

If there is one mistake small town businesses make more often than any other it’s, What ever is left over, we’ll use for advertising.

Marketing and advertising is an investment, not an expense. I know it sure seems like an expense to me when I’m writing the check, but trust me it’s not.

Without enough money put aside for advertising your sales can go down and you suddenly have less and less for promotion.

When do you advertise the most? For most businesses it’s the first day of business. Don’t you have a Grand Opening, balloons, flyers, ads, on-site radio stations, contests, and prizes? Did the income from sales pay for that? No, it didn’t. You advertise most when you need business. You advertise more when you don’t.

An average cost of advertising is usually 1 to 5% of gross sales, which can vary according to location, local advertising rates, and industry. Car dealers need more advertising than funeral homes.

Before we get to the 25 tips let’s look at the basic strategies of successful advertising.

* In order to be successful, your advertising must provide a consumer benefit or solve a problem.
* That benefit or solution must be wanted by the consumer.
* The product or service you are offering must be tied directly to that benefit or solution.
* The benefit or solution must be distinctly communicated through medial advertising. In other words, be clear, forget the advertising glitz and make sure the message isn’t lost in the ad.

A small-budget advertiser doesn’t have the ”deep pockets to develop big advertising campaigns. Some time you need to break the rules to be noticed. Avis did it by admitting they were Number 2 in the car rental business and that campaign took them from 6th place to second place. When they stopped that campaign they dropped back to 6th again. In the past year they have gone back to it.

Budget conscious advertisers must achieve top results for their advertising dollar. Expand your dollars by adopting some creative techniques.

Here’s 25 tips I hope will help you.

  1. Radio, newspapers and magazine specialists will frequently give free help in developing an advertising strategy. Things like demographic information, money-saving ways to produce your ads etc.
  • Place your ads in off hours or in unusual locations for less. Many times you can still reach your target market with these spots.
  • Instead of a one-time big splash ad, be consistent with frequent small ads that work.
  • Monthly magazines sometimes have unsold ad space at the end of the month they will sell at a discount.
  • If you have an 800 number, put it in every ad for immediate response and feedback.
  • Try advertising consistently in the classifieds. These ads may draw more customers than more expensive display ads.
  • Can you barter for the cost of ad production? Maybe the newspaper needs painting in exchange for an ad about your paint store.
  • Piggyback advertising are the ads you receive with your Mastercard bill. Is there someone in your town that sends out a lot of bills? Can you put a small flyer in with their bills and split the postage? Or pay a small fee?
  • Split advertising costs with the people who sell to you. Vendors and manufactures are always looking for exposure. Let people know you carry their products and have the vendor pick up part of the ad cost.
  • Are there up front advertising discounts for cash?
  • Consider advertising in regional issues of national magazines. The costs are lower and you can still reach your target market. TV Guide is a good choice. It stays around for at least a week. Time, Newsweek, and US News and World Report may stay in local doctors offices for years.
  • Share ad costs with neighbor business. Video stores and Pizza parlors are natural partners. Have coupons to each others stores or share the cost of flyers.
  • Try reducing the size of your ad (not in the Yellow Pages) or length of your radio spots. A 60 second spot is not twice as much as a 30 second spot but you won’t get twice as many customers for a 60 over a 30. Going with small ads or shorter spots will allow you to do more ads which normally pulls more customers. It’s better to be there every day with small ads than every month with one big one.
  • Develop tight production controls to minimize the need to reject finished ads. The message is more important than the messenger. Don’t try to produce ads that win awards, produce ads that sell.
  • Who are your very best customers? Aim your ads to talk directly to people like them.
  • What will suppliers give you in the way of point-of-purchase materials. Posters, stand ups, handouts, etc. Some have excellent display racks you can use.
  • Some national chains like Coke and Pepsi provide outdoor signs for businesses. There are also indoor lighted signs you write on with special markers to advertise your special offers.
  • Can you sponsor a community event? A fun-run, golf tournament, or other event that will be well publicized in the community. Your name may not be prominently displayed but sometimes the positive exposure in the community will bring in new customers.
  • Small businesses can seldom afford saturation advertising. You must be selective in the media that reaches your customers. Pin your ad reps down and make them show you exactly how their media reaches your target audience.
  • Exploit the media you choose to the fullest. If your message is verbal, you don’t need TV. Use radio, billboards and newspapers to the fullest.
  • Consider direct mail. A letter and brochure before customer contact can increase business. An IBM study concluded that selling time can be reduced from 9.3 to 1.3 total hours with direct mail advertising. A Sales and Marketing Executives International Study showed salespeople went from eight orders per 100 cold calls to 38 orders per 100 when direct mail was used.
  • Try an editorial style ad. These are ads that look like actual stories in the newspaper. They will have advertisement at the top of the article. Develop a good headline, and 50% more people will read the article than would read an ad of the same size.
  • You can’t match larger competitors dollar-for-dollar but, you can use unusual approaches (like the Avis idea above), color, music, slogans, humor (be careful here), or media selection to win your market away from the big guys.
  • Due to the high costs of conventional advertising on, radio, TV, newspapers, many cost conscious business have been forced to look for lower cost methods. Can you advertise on parking meters, taxi boards, balloons, blimps, and grocery shopping carts. Community bulletin boards, movie ads, and weekly newspaper shoppers.
  • Key your ads. Put something in the ad that will let you know which media it came from. On coupons, put a code that will record the paper and date of the ad. In radio or TV, have them mention the ad to get the discount. Ask every customer how they found you.
  • Plan for a rainy day. During the year put a small amount aside each month for emergencies. You never know when you’ll need to react quickly to whatever the competition is doing. You must be able to capitalize on breaking national events or news regarding your industry. If negative things happen in your industry you may need to respond quickly to make sure the right message is presented.
  • Always give the customer more than you promised and more than they expected. This is tip number 27 of the 25 we advertised. Maybe this last one is the one you needed.
  • I hope these tips will help your business grow. Not all may be relevant to your particular situation. Hopefully, they will illustrate the importance to plan and control your advertising budget.

    Listen in on Tom’s weekly radio show Open For Business on AM 1450 KMMS Radio, Bozeman.
    Have a business question for Tom? Click here to get Tom’s advice for free.
    Stay up to date on business issues. Join Tom’s Blog.

    This article may be reproduced for your non-profit group or organization provided it is not altered in any way and the following is attached:

    Based in Bozeman, MT, Tom Egelhoff is the author of How To Market, Advertise Promote Your Business Or Service In A Small Town. and The Small Town Advertising Handbook: How To Say More And Spend Less. He is also a seminar and workshop presenter and trainer. He may be reached at 888-550-6100 or PO Box 271, Bozeman, MT 59771-0271

    Would you like Tom Egelhoff to speak at your business function or convention?
    Click here for information, topics and pricing.



    How to Buy and Invest in Stocks Investing Ideas and Tips #franchise

    #investment ideas

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    Investing Ideas: How to Buy and Invest in Stocks

    How to Invest in Stocks

    So, you want to invest in stocks? The first rule is to invest in what you know, but it s actually not that simple. It s not enough to simply understand the underlying business you have to understand what makes a good investment, well, a good investment. There exist different schools of thought here, and investing is part art and part science. You can predict and hypothesize as much as you desire, but no one really knows exactly what s going to transpire. Some different styles of investing include:

    Swing Trader

    A swing trading position is held longer than a day trading position, but shorter than a buy and hold investment strategy that can be held for months or years. Typically, a tradable asset would be held for days at a time in order to profit from price changes or ‘swings. Profits can be attained by either buying an asset or by short selling.

    Value Investing

    A value investor believes that the market overreacts to both good and bad news. He/she would look for stocks that they believe the market has undervalued; thereby profiting by buying when the price is deflated.

    Growth Investing

    Growth investors invest in companies that show above-average growth. Growth investing focuses on capital appreciation. Growth investing kind of contrasts with value investing.

    Great chess players don’t sit at a board and just…play.

    Masters of the game have a very concrete plan of how they intend to play. They decision-making that can adapt to whatever their opponents throw at them. Investing is no different: you need a plan to guide your investment decisions!

    Deciding What to Invest In

    You know you are ready and willing to invest. Now it s time to decide in what. Make sure to:

    Research ETFs

    Find the exchange-traded fund which track the performance of the industry and check out their holdings.

    Choose Sectors

    Select your stocks based on specific criteria (sector, industry etc.) Use a screener to further sort companies by dividend yield, market cap and other super useful metrics.

    Stay Informed

    Keep up-to-date. Read stock analysis articles. Read financial news releases. Stay critical.

    Types of Investments


    Bonds

    Bonds, or fixed-income securities, are debt investments in which an investor loans money to an entity, with interest. The borrower borrows the funds for either a fixed or variable period of time.

    Mutual Funds

    Mutual funds are operated by money managers and should match the investor s objective. They are made up of a bunch of funds collected from many investors and the purpose is to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, etc.

    Small-Cap Stocks

    Small-cap investors are the risk takers. These small companies have huge potential for growth. However because they are often under-recognized, more research is necessary. This requires the investor to have more time available to properly crunch numbers.

    Large-Cap Stocks

    Large-cap investors are more conservative these guys like to play it safe. With their steady dividend payouts, these big-cap blue chip companies are as stable as they come

    Penny Stocks

    Penny stocks are super high risk because of their lack of liquidity. Beginners are often lured in to these stocks because of their crazy low share price. This allows investors to hold thousands of shares for a relatively small amount of invested capital. With a scale like that, the gain of just a few cents per share can translate into major returns.

    Finding Good Stocks to Buy

    Within each stock sector, the ultimate goal is to find the stocks that are showing the greatest price appreciation. In the same way that one would pay attention to sectors, multiple timeframes should also be examined to make sure the stock in question is moving well over time. There are two main things to keep an eye on when selecting stocks:


    Liquidity

    It isn t smart to invest in a stock that has very little volume. What if quick liquidation is required? Selling it at a fair price will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Unless you are a seasoned trader, invest in stocks that trade at least a couple hundred thousand shares per day. Save yourself the headache.

    Price

    Trade in stocks that are at least $5. Don t shy away from a stock just because of its high price. Don t buy a stock just because of its low price.

    Investment Ideas

    Want to invest like The Greats? Take a look at the strategies these big guys used to earn their names:

    Warren Buffet

    Warren Buffet is considered a value investor. Essentially, he selects stocks that are priced at a significant discount to what he believes is their intrinsic value. When Buffett buys stocks, he buys them for keeps. This requires a lot of discipline: it s hard to resist buying or selling when the market seems perfectly ripe to act.

    Buffet views the stock market as temperamental. He doesn t panic when stocks plummet, or celebrate when they skyrocket. Instead, the Oracle of Omaha maintains the keep calm and carry on mantra, only buying stocks he intends to hold indefinitely, if not forever.

    Peter Lynch

    Lynch is also a value investor who stresses fundamental analysis. Lynch s bottom-up approach involves focusing on an individual company, rather than the entire industry or the market as a whole. The idea here is that what really matters is the quality and growth potential of a specific company, regardless of whether the industry is under-performing or even in a tailspin.

    Here are 3 additional Lynch stresses when looking at a company from the bottom up:

    Good research pays off

    Shut out market noise

    Invest for the long term

    Philip Fisher

    Philip Fisher was a growth investor. He consistently invested in well-managed, high-quality growth companies. He would hold on to these for the long term. His famous fifteen points to look for in a common stock were divided up into two categories: management’s qualities and the characteristics of the business itself.

    When Fisher found an investment he liked, he wasn t afraid to take an outsized position of the stock within his portfolio. In fact, Fisher sometimes downplayed the value of diversification. He often found himself scouring the tech sector because the pace of c hange there creates an environment that is ripe for disruptive innovations.

    Best Stocks to Buy in 2015

    Here are some best performing stocks of 2015:



    Writing a Business Etiquette: Useful Tips – Business Letters – Sell Letter

    #business etiquette

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    Writing a Business Etiquette: Useful Tips

    Writing a business etiquette can be quite complicated for someone who has never had any experience in this particular field. By following several important tips, you will be able to write the perfect cubicle etiquette. All you have to do is follow a few close-call rules. First and foremost, you have to know that when you start your message, you should not sound too harsh, nor too mellow. Start it with a casual greeting that is commonly used, including the name of the recipient. Use something like good morning , good day , good afternoon or a simple hello.

    Another thing that you should keep in mind is send the e-mail to the appropriate recipients. Include all of the recipients who are supposed to read the e-mail, but aren t truly required to give you a reply. Include them in the cc section.

    When you are writing your e-mail, make sure that your subject line is meaningful and descriptive. You can craft some interesting subject line which is going to give the recipient some info about the true content included in your e-mail.

    While you are writing, make sure that your message is totally concise and clear. Stick to just one important topic while you are writing. Do not go off on different tangents based on all kinds of unrelated subjects. Also, proofreading is a must. Your e-mail should always be checked for all kinds of grammatical or spelling mistakes before you click the send button.

    Think of computer viruses, too. They can be transported by a simple exchange of e-mails. That is why you should always protect all of your recipients by carefully scanning your attached photographs, documents and all kinds of files with your laptop or computer antivirus program.

    Always avoid using some of those popular emoticons. Emoticons are not supposed to be used if you are writing a business etiquette! They come off as extremely unprofessional and should never be included in e-mails which are supposed to be sent to your boss or manager. Also, do not send some inappropriate jokes which you are going to be sorry for later on. What may be funny to your closest colleagues might not be that intriguing to your boss.

    Use your signature in the e-mail you are writing. Write a thank you or sincerely , and of course use your business logo, alongside some personal info like your phone, e-mail, or some link that can connect the recipient to your profile on a social network. Another thing that you should always have in mind is that you are supposed to respond to e-mails in a timely manner. Do not let your boss wait around your e-mail for too long. The most appropriate time is in just a couple of hours after you have received the e-mail.

    The perfect time would be within one hour after receiving the e-mail, but if you have not seen it, respond immediately after seeing it. Just don t do it late at night or on a Sunday, because that can sometimes seem a bit inappropriate and out of the blue. Respond in a normal timely manner.

    Related



    Five Tips to Make PowerPoint Business Presentations More Effective #business #management #courses


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    Five Tips to Make PowerPoint Business Presentations More Effective

    Using PowerPoint in a Business Presentation?
    These five tips will make your communication more effective

    It is almost expected today that you will use PowerPoint in business presentations. It can be used to add visuals to the message and is an easy way to create a leave-behind handout or e-mail the presentation to others later. But too often business presenters aren’t as effective as they could be when delivering a PowerPoint presentation. Here are five tips drawn from my training programs for making your next PowerPoint business presentation more effective.

    Start with Structure First

    I always start my workshops by suggesting that presenters plan their presentation on paper before they sit down at the computer. Start by defining the goal of the presentation – what you want the audience to do, feel, understand or act on when you are done. Next, describe where the audience is today in terms of their knowledge, trust of you, attitudes and roles in the organization. Once you have the starting point and destination, you can now plan the route that you will use to take the audience through your presentation. This is just like a GPS does when determining the best route from your location to a destination (this article discusses the GPS approach to planning your presentation and includes a video of me explaining the idea). Using sticky notes to lay out the main ideas and supporting data is a good way to see the entire presentation at once. Now you can decide where visuals will add to your message and what those visuals should be.

    Use Colors Fonts that are Easy to See

    You don’t need to have a graphic design background in order to design slides that are visually appealing. Decide on a simple standard look for your slides so that the audience has visual consistency throughout the presentation. Select background and text colors that have enough contrast so that the text will be easy to read. Instead of guessing at whether the colors have enough contrast, check the colors with the Color Contrast Calculator. For any text, research tells us that a sans-serif font, like Arial or Calibri, is easier to read when projected, so use one of these fonts. For font size, it depends on the size of the screen and the size of the room (you can see a detailed chart based on visual acuity calculations here ). But if you use fonts that are 24-32 point size as a minimum, you will usually be safe.

    Use Visuals Instead of Text Slides

    Audiences don’t want you to read slides full of text to them – surveys show it is the most annoying thing presenters can do (here is the latest survey on what audiences tell me annoys them about PowerPoint presentations ). So use visuals instead of paragraphs of text. Use graphs to illustrate numeric data. Use diagrams to show processes or flows of information or goods. Use pictures to show a person, place or object. Use media clips to bring the views of others into your presentation. There are many more visuals that you can use. If you need a method for creating visuals, use the HVF approach in my book Select Effective Visuals. If you create financial presentations, check out this webinar on how to turn spreadsheets into visuals .

    Practice and Rehearse

    Creating your presentation at the last minute is not a good idea because it does not allow you to practice and rehearse. Practice is when you sit with your presentation and mentally review what you are going to say and how you want the flow to work. Practice is not enough, although many presenters think it is sufficient. You must also rehearse your presentation by standing and delivering it as if it was for real. This is the only way to check your words, your visuals and whether the message is as clear as you want it to be. It is also the only way to truly check your timing to make sure you don’t run over the allotted time.

    End Your Presentation with Next Steps

    In my opinion, the single worst way to end your presentation is with a slide that has the word “Questions. ” in big bold text on it. This type of ending invites your audience to question everything you have just said and does not move them the last step towards the goal you had set for your presentation. As I have recommended to many of the presenters I have worked with, end your presentation talking about the next steps that you want the audience to take to use the information you have provided. Invite discussion of the next steps if there is time, but end with a strong call to action so the audience is clear what they are to do next. Without a call to action, the audience is likely to do nothing further, and your presentation goal will not have been achieved.

    By using these five tips, your next PowerPoint business presentation will be more effective because you will provide a structure for your message and deliver it in a way that the audience will understand it. The success of your presentation is mostly determined before you ever get up to speak. Take the time to prepare using these ideas and look forward to many successful PowerPoint business presentations.

    If you create and deliver sales presentations, check out my Kindle ebook ” 20 Tips for Effective Sales Presentations with PowerPoint “. If you create and deliver financial presentations, check out my Kindle ebook “20 Tips for Effective Financial Presentation with PowerPoint ” and this slideshare.



    6 Smart Budgeting Tips for Small Business Owners #business #leads


    #small business tips

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    6 Smart Budgeting Tips for Small Business Owners

    If you run a small business, it s likely that you re operating on a relatively limited budget. Whether you bootstrapped your business or are trying to pay back loans you took out to cover your startup costs, it s in your best interest to conserve money wherever you can.

    Without a thorough budget plan, however, it can be difficult to track and manage your finances. This is especially true for any unexpected business expenses that may come up, as they often do. A 2015 survey by small business credit provider Headway Capital found that although 57 percent of small business owners anticipated growth this year, nearly 19 percent were concerned about how unexpected expenses would impact their business.

    If you want to keep your business operating in the black, you ll need to account for both fixed and unplanned costs, and then create and stick to a solid budget. Experts offered their advice for small business owners looking to keep their finances in order. [4 Tips for Reducing Startup Costs]

    Define and understand your risks

    Every business venture has a certain degree of risk involved, and all of those risks have the potential for a financial impact on your company. Paul Cho, managing director of Headway Capital, said that small business owners need to consider their long- and short-term risks to accurately plan for their financial future.

    How will changes in minimum wage or health care requirements impact your workforce? Cho said. Do you operate in a geography at high risk of a natural disaster? Do you rely heavily on seasonal workers? Understanding the potential risks facing you on a short- and long-term basis is important for all small businesses. Once you ve mapped out the threats to productivity, a clearer picture can be built around emergency planning, insurance needs, etc.

    Overestimate your expenses

    If your business operates on a project-to-project basis, you know that every client is different and no two projects will turn out exactly the same. This means that often, you can t predict when something is going to go over budget.

    Every project seems to have a one-time cost that was never anticipated, said James Ontra, CEO of presentation management company Shufflrr. It usually is that one unique extra item [that is] necessary to the job, but [was] not anticipated when bidding the job.

    For this reason, Ontra advised budgeting slightly above your anticipated line-item costs, no matter what, so that if you do go over, you won t be fully unprepared.

    I go by the cost-moon-stars theory, he said. If you think it will cost the moon, expect to pay the stars.

    Pay attention to your sales cycle

    Many businesses go through busy and slow periods over the course of the year. If your company has an off-season , you ll need to account for your expenses during that time. Cho also suggested using your slower periods to think of ways to plan ahead for your next sales boom.

    There is much to be learned from your sales cycles, he said. Use your downtime to ramp up your marketing efforts while preventing profit generation from screeching to a halt. In order to keep your company thriving and the revenue coming in, you will have to identify how to market to your customers in new and creative ways.

    Plan for large purchases carefully and early

    Some large business expenses occur when you least expect them a piece of equipment breaks and needs to be replaced or your delivery van needs a costly repair, for instance. However, planned expenses like store renovations or a new software system should be carefully timed and budgeted to avoid a huge financial burden on your business.

    Substantial business changes need to be timed carefully, balancing the risk with the reward and done with a full understanding of the financial landscape you re operating within, Cho told Business News Daily. An up-to-date budget and data-driven financial projections are important components that help guide when to make large investments in your business.

    Remember that time is money, too

    One of the biggest mistakes small businesses make is forgetting to incorporate their time into a budget plan. Ontra reminded business owners that time is money, especially when working with people who are paid for their time.

    Timing underestimation directly increases costs, Ontra said. For us, the biggest underestimation is allotting time for client feedback. It is a Herculean effort sometimes to meet a deadline with lots of people focused on a single task. Then, the client needs to give feedback for us to proceed. If the client is distracted with other issues, feedback planned for a three-day turnaround, can become a week or longer. Not only do you start to lose time to the delivery schedule, your team also loses momentum as their collective thought shifts focus to another project.

    Ontra recommended treating your time like your money, and set external deadlines later than when you think the project will actually be done.

    If you believe the project will finish on Friday, promise delivery on Monday, he said. So, if you finish on Friday, deliver the work early and become a star. If for some reason time runs over, deliver on Monday and you are still a success.

    Constantly revisit your budget

    Your budget will never be static or consistent it will change and evolve along with your business, and you ll need to keep adjusting it based on your growth and profit patterns. Cho suggested revising your monthly and annual budgets regularly to get a clearer, updated picture of your business finances.

    Regularly revisiting your budget will help you better control financial decisions because you will know exactly what you can afford to spend versus how much you are projecting to make, Cho said. Take into account market trends from the previous year to help you determine what this year may look like. Once you have a clear understanding of your business s budgetary needs, you can accurately forecast what can be set aside for an emergency fund or unexpected costs.

    Nicole Fallon Taylor

    Nicole received her Bachelor s degree in Media, Culture and Communication from New York University. She began freelancing for Business News Daily in 2010 and joined the team as a staff writer three years later. She currently serves as the assistant editor. Reach her by email. or follow her on Twitter .

    You May Also like

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  • 9 Tips For Growing A Successful Business #business #awards


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    9 Tips For Growing A Successful Business

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    To succeed in business today, you need to be flexible and have good planning and organizational skills. Many people start a business thinking that they’ll turn on their computers or open their doors and start making money – only to find that making money in a business is much more difficult than they thought. You can avoid this in your business ventures by taking your time and planning out all the necessary steps you need to reach to achieve success. Read on to find out how.

    1. GetOrganized
    To be successful in business you need to be organized. Organization will help you complete tasks and stay on top of things to be done. A good way to do this is to create a to-do list each day – as you complete each item, check it off your list. This will ensure that you’re not forgetting anything and you’re completing all the tasks that are essential to the survival of your business.

    2. Keep Detailed Records
    All successful businesses keep detailed records. By keeping detailed records, you’ll know where the business stands financially and what potential challenges you could be facing. Just knowing this gives you time to create strategies to overcome the obstacles that can prevent you from being successful and growing your business.

    3. Analyze Your Competition
    Competition breeds the best results. To be successful, you can’t be afraid to study and learn from your competitors. After all, they may be doing something right that you can implement in your business to make more money.

    4. Understand the Risks and Rewards
    The key to being successful is taking calculated risks to help your business grow. A good question to ask is “What’s the downside?” If you can answer this question, then you know what the worst-case scenario is. This knowledge will allow you to take the kinds of calculated risks that can generate tremendous rewards for your business.

    5. Be Creative
    Always be looking for ways to improve your business and to make it stand out from the competition. Recognize that you don’t know everything and be open to new ideas and new approaches to your business.

    6. Stay Focused
    The old saying that “Rome was not built in a day” applies here. Just because you open a business doesn’t mean that you’re going to immediately start making money. It takes time to let people know who you are, so stay focused on achieving your short-term goals and give the rest time to come together on its own.

    7. Prepare to Make Sacrifices
    The lead-up to starting a business is hard work, but after you open your doors, your work has just begun. In many cases, you have to put in more time than you would if you were working for someone else. In turn, you have to make sacrifices, such as spending less time with family and friends in order to be successful.

    8. Provide Great Service
    There are many successful businesses that forget that providing great customer service is important. If you provide better service for your customers, they’ll be more inclined to come to you the next time they need something instead of going to your competition.

    9. Be Consistent
    Consistency is key component to making money in business. You have to consistently keep doing the things necessary to be successful day in and day out. This will create long-term positive habits that will help you make money over the long term.

    Conclusion
    Starting and running a successful business can be rewarding and challenging. Success requires focus, discipline and perseverance. However, success will not come over night – it requires a long-term focus and that you remain consistent in challenging environments.



    How to Start a T-Shirt Business – 10 Tips #small #business #ideas

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    How To Start A T-Shirt Business: 10 Essential Tips

    It seems nowadays everybody s selling t-shirts and, if you haven t started already, you might be next. Before you jump into the t-shirt business you might wanna take a few pointers, and we ve got you covered.

    Here s a guide on how to start a t-shirt business . divided into the 10 most important aspects.

    How to Start a T-Shirt Business

    1. Do your research

    Make sure you re knowledgeable about the clothing industry before you dive in. Get an understanding of how the business works. Read about how other brands became successful, and model a similar strategy.

    Get some insider info from our past brand owner interviews .

    2. Plan everything

    Before you get started, get all the info you can on how to start a t-shirt business and have a clear idea of what you plan on doing. Try to decide things like what kind of t-shirts you plan on selling, who your target market is, whether your t-shirts will be available online only or if you ll eventually be aiming to sell in stores.

    Plan a marketing strategy that involves both free and paid advertising methods of getting your brand in front of your target market. Compose a practical business plan to use as a guideline for operating. For starters, identify your brand s values, mission, objectives, strategies, goals, and long term vision.

    For a good way to organize your planning, try Google Drive .

    3. Know your competition

    You should always know what other clothing labels you ll be competing with. If you re starting a label based on humorous t-shirts you should watch what all the other funny t-shirt labels are doing. Keep track of things like their design variety, pricing, and promotion, because it may spur some new ideas for your own business strategy.

    This can be done easily nowadays by reading the blogs of competitor brands and signing up to their newsletters to keep tabs on what they re up to. This knowledge can help you keep up.

    Keep track of your competitors activity by following indie clothing blogs like Hypebeast .

    4. Create products you believe your audience would buy

    It seems this step should be obvious, but you’d be surprised at some of the t-shirts you can find these days. Test the quality of your t-shirts by getting honest opinions from others, preferably people who are within your target audience.

    To get real feedback from your potential audience, experiment with polls via Facebook .

    5. Know the finances of starting a business

    Once you know what you plan on doing, get an idea of how much everything is gonna cost you. When you start producing and selling t-shirts, keep track of all of your expenses. Get screen printing quotes from several printers and compare prices to get the best deal, without sacrificing quality.

    Add in the cost for labeling, hang tagging, bagging, or whatever other finishing options you might use. Don t forget the shipping envelopes, boxes, and product storage. Don t be fooled by the hundreds of new t-shirt start-ups you see these days; starting a t-shirt business isn t cheap. A lot of this should also help you decide how much you should charge for your clothing.

    Clothing Brand Startup Tools

    Starting a clothing brand? Got a small budget?
    Check out our startup tools for our selection of cost-effective services and products for starting your brand.

    6. Come up with a solid promotion strategy

    Figure out a way to spread the word in a manner that those who discover your brand go on to spread the word to others. For starters, your strategy can include PPC ads, press releases to blogs, and social networking. You can even give away t-shirts with your logo for free. Using guerrilla tactics and promotional items like this can have a tremendous impact on your business growth.

    However, don t be a Cheapo. Sooner or later you ll realize that you re gonna have to spend money to market your t-shirt business, so you should be willing to pay for things like online ads, event sponsorships, and other paid marketing methods. Understandably not everyone is rollin in the dough, so find smart ways to balance paid promotion with free promotion to create an excellent strategy.

    Paid promotion options: Consider a Google Adwords campaign or get social network visibility through a PopularPays .

    Free promotion options: Actively engage your Instagram audience every single day. Follow hundreds of potential fans, comment on and like thousands of photos, and consistently post to your account. Replicate the same strategy through other channels.

    7. Find partners

    You might start out on your own but you should find partners to help maximize your brand s potential and help you reach your goals more efficiently. Aim to have partners within your company while also collaborating with other businesses that may be of some help to you.

    Start with your good friends, skilled associates or trustworthy family members. Still no luck? Try browsing potential candidates through Founder2Be .

    8. Set business goals

    Once you ve educated yourself on how to start a t-shirt business it s time to set some real goals. How many t-shirts do you plan on selling this year? How about this month or this week? Alot of people new to the business have no idea, or just don t care. Then there s the group of people who are too scared to set a goal out of fear that they won t reach it.

    A successful business sets goals for success in order to have a solid idea of what it s working towards. Set a goal and believe in your ability to reach it. As the law of attraction goes: if you know you re gonna reach it, you re gonna reach it. If you decide from this day forward that you will sell 10 t-shirts every week, and strongly believe in your business, you ll do everything you can to figure out a way to get those tees moving. If you don t set a goal you may end up stuck with a box of t-shirts you were too scared to sell.

    Keep track of your goals through Google Drive .

    9. Don t quit because you re not seeing sales the first day

    That s a good way to get you nowhere. Try to figure out ways of improving your designs, your strategy or your work habits. When you re just getting started you re still learning so keep at it. Winners never quit and quitters never win. Read informative, motivational books, to keep your spirits up.

    Frequently visit other brand s websites and blogs, and see how much fun they re having, to remind yourself of where you wanna be in a few years and how bad you really want it. Reanalyze your business plan, promotional efforts, and branding strategy. Consider how you compare to the competition and emphasize your competitive edge.

    Continually expand your knowledge on the business by checking out some of our past t-shirt business articles.

    10. Have fun

    If you re in it just to make a quick buck you’re not gonna succeed and that goes for ANY business. Love what you do and do what you love. Your passion will definitely show in your brand image. The more fun it is, the more productive you ll be. Just don t get too carried away. On second thought, go ahead!

    BONUS TIP:

    Read LAUNCH A KICK-ASS T-SHIRT BRAND for in depth advice and more tips on how to start a t-shirt business. Tons of useful information you can t afford to miss!

    RESOURCES ON HOW TO START A T-SHIRT BUSINESS

    SIGN UP TO DOWNLOAD OUR FREE GUIDE + MORE T-SHIRT BUSINESS TIPS!