Tag : Who

6 Business Icons Who Made TIME Person of the Year #the #small

#business icons

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TIME has dedicated one issue to the “Person of the Year. ” The award, which is “bestowed to those who have, for good or for ill, most influenced the news and our lives in the past year,” has gone to politicians, scientists, humanitarians and entrepreneurs. Click through to see the business icons who have graced the magazine’s famous cover over the years.

1928 – Walter Chrysler

Before starting what would become one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Walter Chrysler worked as a railroad mechanic and locomotive machinist in West Texas. After serving as the head of Buick for three years, Chrysler was tapped to turn around the failing Willys-Overland Motor Company in Flint, Michigan. The now defunct company would become the automaker known today as Chrysler. Two years after being awarded Person of the Year, Chrysler financed the construction of the Chrysler Building in New York City, all with his personal fortune. The building stood as the tallest in the world for 11 months, when the Empire State Building surpassed it. Upon his death in 1938, Chrysler’s estate was worth roughly $8.9 million dollars – almost $150 million by today’s standards.

1955 – Harlow Curtis

In 1914, Harlow Curtis, the son of a fruit vendor in rural Michigan, responded to a newspaper ad for a bookkeeper position at the AC Spark Plug Company in Flint, Michigan. Following 15 years of service at AC, Curtis was named president of the spark plug company. According to GM’s online history portal. Curtis worked his way up the Detroit-ranks, landed a position at Buick and eventually became president of the highly profitable GM branch. In 1953, Curtis was named president of General Motors, and at his helm became the first American company to reach $1 billion in profits. A year later, TIME named Curtis “Man of the Year” in recognition of this achievement.

1991 – Ted Turner

Now a household name and waiting room fixture nationwide, CNN had plenty of skeptics when Ted Turner launched the first 24-hour news network in 1980. Built on the foundations Turner had put into place as the head of his father’s advertising firm and as the owner of the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, Turner changed news from a once-daily occurrence to a never-ending cycle. As of 2010, CNN was streaming to 100 million American households and another 98 million satellite subscribers throughout the world. Turner is worth $2.2 billion, according to Forbes . making him one of the wealthiest men in the country. The wealthy conglomerate extends beyond media, too. Ted’s Montana Grill serves up western-inspired food sourced from Turner’s bison located on ranches throughout the west and abroad.

1997 – Andrew Grove

As he proclaims in his book, “Only the paranoid survive.” This is the driving principle that has made Andrew Grove so insanely successful. Born in Hungary, Grove escaped communism to finish his education, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Grove was a pioneer the burgeoning semi-conductor industry. Once at the helm of Intel, Grove revolutionized the company into the highest valued computer chip maker in the world today. Under Groves leadership, Intel saw an increase in revenue from $1.9 million in 1987 to an astonishing $26.27 billion in 1998. Steve Jobs idolized Grove, seeking his advice when considering a return to Apple as CEO. In 1997, a year before Grove relinquished his title of CEO, Grove was awarded “Person of the Year ” on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the transistor.

1999 – Jeff Bezos

The e-commerce pioneer is most well known for his establishment of Amazon as an Internet commerce icon. Originally a source for books, Amazon had expanded to almost everything by 1999 when Jeff Bezos was awarded “Person of the Year.” Born to a teenage mother, Bezos was technologically adept from a young age, tinkering in his parents’ garage. In 2013, Amazon reported net revenue of $74.5 billion and employed over 132,000. Alexa, the domain ranking service, credits Amazon as the seventh most-visited website in the world. Since his recognition, Bezos has been up to quite a bit. In addition to his continued innovations at Amazon (did someone say drones ?), he acquired The Washington Post from longtime owners, the Graham family. Bezos is betting on his knack for web innovation to bring the publication into the digital age.

2010 – Mark Zuckerberg

The same year as he was hailed as TIME’s “Person of the Year “, The Social Network film sealed Mark Zuckerberg ‘s place as an American demagogue, next to the likes of Steve Jobs and others. In a Harvard dorm room, Zuckerberg and friends created what would become Facebook. The website spawned an entire social networking industry. Facebook’s massive $5 billion IPO, the third largest in history, would increase Zuckerberg’s wealth to about $33.1 billion, according to Forbes . making him No. 16 on the list of wealthiest Americans. His wealth makes him part of an elite club – one of three people with more billions than they have years of age. As of September, Facebook boasted 864 million daily active users .



Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for? #market

#business development

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Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for? Mark Kershaw

Financial Fridays: Why Today Is The Day You Have To Reinvent Yourself James Altucher Участник Influencer

End of the line for Priceline s Name Your Own Price airfares George Hobica

Five months into my #Helen4SG campaign Helen Clark Участник Influencer

The Stereotype-Defying MBAs in the Class of 2018 John A. Byrne Участник Influencer

Ireland appeals $14.5 billion Apple Tax ruling; Gatorade wants a piece of the organic action; And more news John C Abell

Let the Engineers Hire Their Scrum Master Stefan Wolpers

This Week s #Winners and #Losers Ian Bremmer Участник Influencer

Resilience is More Than a Buzzword Diane Regas

Accounting: Making change happen Geni Whitehouse Участник Influencer

Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for?

Is it the same for everyone?

Having now worked in a number of roles that you might consider as business development (BD), I thought I’d start my publishing journey on LinkedIn (this is my first post) with a bit of reflection.

I often get asked what the difference between straight selling and BD is, so I thought I’d try and define the differences (for my own sake, if nothing more!).

To some degree, they’re different sides of the same coin.

Selling and BD go hand in hand.

I’ve been in roles where I’ve been strictly selling, others where there is a combination of sales and BD, and also in roles that I would consider true and pure BD.

In all, however, I’ve had some link to what would be considered BD within that particular business.

So the answer to the header title is no, I think; BD is different for everyone and every business, dependent on a number of factors – budget, size of workforce, attitude to BD, etc.

What is ‘true and pure’ BD?

The sales process is one that involves a lot of people – product development, designers, pricing, marketing, technical, management – ‘front-line’ salesmen and ‘top-end’ management need to combine forces to deliver a product that their customers want.

If you walk into a shop to buy a pair of trainers, for example, this has been designed from the early stages by trained footwear designers, manufactured from these designs in a production process of sorts (industrial or bespoke, depending on the brand), marketed in the appropriate manner to raise awareness of the product, eventually landing on the shelves of the shop you’re in, with a friendly guy/gal willing to help you transact some business when you make the decision to buy them.

So where does BD fit into this process? What’s it all about then?

I think the foremost word that comes up in the BD world is ‘relationships’.

That’s pretty much what it’s all about.

Good business development will help identify, maintain and encourage relationship building within a firm, building rapport with both suppliers and customers.

It helps strengthen the bonds between these links, supporting the marketing copy and material that establishes your product in the relevant marketplace.

It helps provide information as to what the client needs to the ‘front line’ sales team, assisting them in closing the deal at the end of the process.

It helps inform management as to how the market is moving, providing insights into new developments of technology, social media and other digital avenues that the firm can take advantage of, to build and maintain loyalty.

It helps small companies access bigger markets and large companies engage newcomers.

So my definition of ‘true and pure’ BD is ‘helping a business to develop its relationships’.

Plain and simple.

It’s networking on a daily basis; attending cutting-edge events to learn about the industry you’re working in; finding (er. stalking?) people on LinkedIn to see what events they’re attending and making sure you meet them there, in person, so that you can have that all important introductory chat; it’s offering your loyal customers something more than a newsletter – why not run a seminar and invite them along to it? They might be happy to be invited.

The personal touch is always a winner.

We hear more and more now about relationships marketing, social currency, engagement, etc.

BD is the platform that most of this is built on.

As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve worked in roles that have been classed as BD but have really been sales. I’ve worked in hybrid roles where you might do a bit of both. And I’ve worked in the ‘true and pure’ BD roles to.

What this has shown me is that BD has a place in every business. You can’t ‘develop’ your business without a good BD strategy.

So whether you’re encouraging your front-line staff to sign up to a few newsletters, or get yourself down to a few networking events, or join a LinkedIn group and start up a discussion, BD is something that can’t be overlooked.

It’s all very well to have a great product and a nicely designed website, with some great leaflets and a slick business card but, without the right approach to BD, no one is going to see it in the way you want to.

Having worked as a supplier to a lot of startups and growing SMEs, the one thing that I’ve noticed which has set apart the successes from the failures is their approach to BD.

Develop the relationships – build a community around your business and your product just needs to do what it says on the tin. The rest will fall into place and you’ll have a strong, loyal customer base who are happy to sing your praises.

For that reason alone, if nothing else, BD is essential for pretty much any business going.

That’s my opinion anyway, although I may be a bit bias, of course.



About Sumy Designs – Who We Are and What We Do –

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Who We are and What We Do

We are Sumy Designs, LLC. Our business is based in West Lafayette, Indiana.

Our History: Sumy Designs was created by two sisters, Susan Sullivan and Amy Masson in 2006. Susan had been working as an advertising and marketing director with a large publishing firm while Amy had been teaching computer technology. After leaving those respective career paths, a friend asked if we’d like to make a website for her. We said yes. A friend of this friend saw that website and asked us to make a website for her. We said yes. And so and so forth and now we have created many, many sites for many happy clients across the US, Canada, and England.

Susan is our designer, in charge of all things creative and beautiful. She has the vision and skills it takes to create custom masterpieces for every project.

Amy is our resident technical expert, with the skills to make every website function as it should.

Interesting fact: While the business is based in West Lafayette, Susan lives in the Dallas Forth Worth area. We work together virtually, via email and video chat, to seamlessly design, manage, and maintain projects of all sizes.

Where’d you come up with the name Sumy? It’s a combination of our first names. SU san and aMY.

Our Support Team

While Amy does the behind the scenes work and Susan does the design, there are a lot of other areas that need attention, so we have recruited a team of fabulous people to work with us to bring these jobs to completion. Being a virtual business, we are able to employ people from all over the country to work with us.



Small business: 21 tips from entrepreneurs who are killing it #boston #business

#small business tips

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21 tips from small businesses that are killing it

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience.

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itselfbefore you look at growth. The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.

2. Add a personal touch.

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.

3. Leverage social media.

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible.

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I ve read somewhere.

5. Focus on your specialty.

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.

6. Outsource the things you don t do.

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.

7. Aim high and be persistent.

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don t take no for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic.

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it s all about finding the right balance for you. I am learning that I don t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.

9. Follow your own path.

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself not worrying about what other people were doing.

10. Take time out to think about how to improve.

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: How is my business better this week than it was last week?

11. Harness your keystone habits .

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who has their act together isn t nearly as hard as you might think.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practise mindfulness.

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success.

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.

14. Hire from within your networks.

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.

15. Keep it manageable.

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it s important to remember that it s not all about non-stop growth bigger isn t better if you ve stopped enjoying what you do. You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help. Source: Supplied

16. Know when to work for free.

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. Free doesn t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.

17. Stay excited and believe in your business.

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.

18. Learn to say no.

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can t give your project the time and attention it needs.

If you re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration.

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.

21. Know when to take a dream detour .

Sometimes it s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you ll find that s half the battle won.



Pedro Cassiano Santos, Partners, Team, Who We Are – Vieira de Almeida,

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Pedro Cassiano Santos

Partners

Academic background
Law Degree, University of Lisbon, Faculty of Law.
Post-graduation in European Legal Studies, College of Europe, Bruges, Belgium.

Teaching chairs
Guest Professor/Lecturer at the Catholic University of Lisbon (Asset Backed Securities lecture on the LLM and Post-Graduate programmes 2008/2011) and at the Institute for Banking Management (Instituto Superior de Gest�o Banc�ria) (Banking Supervision lecture 2010/2011).

Professional experience (VdA)
Pedro joined Vieira de Almeida & Associados in 1989 and is currently the head partner in charge at the Banking & Finance area of practice taking responsibility for clients and transactions of the financial sector. He is regularly involved in the provision of legal advice in banking and capital markets’ regulatory matters as well as in the structuring of several financing transactions, such as the issue and placement (both national and international) of debt, hybrid and equity instruments, and the issue and placement of warrants and both cash and synthetic financial products. He has also been actively working in securitization transactions and other types of asset-backed transactions, together with the preparation of structured finance transactions, matters in respect of which he is a regular speaker in conferences and a guest teacher of many Masters and Post Graduate courses organized by distinct Institutes and Universities.

Published works
Author of various publications on matters within his fields of expertise, namely:

“Securitization in Portugal”, Asset Finance International – Mar�o 2000�

“The Portuguese Securitisation market”, Global Securitisation Review – 2003/2004

“2003 a landmark year for Portuguese securitization”, IFLR – The 2004 Guide to Structured Finance – 2004

“Public Sector Securitisation in Europe”, Global Trade and Finance Series – Securitisation of Derivatives and Alternative Asset classes Yearbook 2005

“Sovereign Securitisation in Europe”, International Banking and Finance Law Series, Innovation in Securitisation Yearbook 2006

“Reform heralds new era for mortgage bonds”, IFLR Structured – 2006

“The Portuguese CMBS Markets – Mortgage-Covered Bonds: a brave new tool”, Commercial Mortgage-Backed Securitisation Developments in the European Market – 2006

“The impact of Basel II, Portugal Structured Finance”, IFLR Supplement

“Financial Regulation, International Briefings”, IFLR – Outubro 2007

“Portuguese Capital Markets – Overview and future prospects”, Legal Week – 2010

“Portugal”, The Banking Regulation Review, Law Business Research – 2011�to 2014

And co -author of various publications on matters within his fields of expertise, namely:

O Mercado Portugu�s da Titulariza��o de Cr�ditos: Diversifica��o e Maturidade”, Instituto dos Valores Mobili�rios – Direito dos Valores Mobili�rios, Separata do Volume VI – 2006

International Acquisition Finance – Portugal, European Lawyer (Hendrik Haag) – 2008

Member of
Admitted to the Portuguese Bar Association and admitted as specialist in financial law.

Languages: English, French, Spanish



Texas Divorce by Publication #who #is #the #petitioner #in #a #divorce


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    Texas Divorce By Publication – Missing Spouse

    When a Spouse Cannot Be Found in Texas

    When one spouse wants to call it quits but cannot find his or her missing partner, or when he or she is hiding, divorce by publication comes into play. Divorce by publication happens only after a judge has been convinced, based on a sworn declaration, of the serving party’s inability to find the Defendant after trying hard. Service by publication is commonly used in a divorce action to serve a spouse who has disappeared without a leaving a forwarding address. In Texas, divorce by publication is not an easy route to go.

    When the Respondent cannot or will not be found (and, therefore, cannot be served process by personal service, which is the preferred method), the Petitioner may attempt service by certified mail, which is only valid if the missing spouse’s signature appears on the green postal receipt card. If someone else signs for him or her, the Petitioner must try again. If these two steps fail, the court may allow alternative service, which means the Petitioner files a sworn statement and motion the alternative service would be “reasonably effective to give the Respondent notice.”

    If the missing spouse has been served a copy of the Petition, the process server must complete a Return of Citation, which certifies receipt.

    If the Petitioner cannot locate the missing spouse, and the parties have no children and limited property, the court may allow legal notice to be posted in the courthouse. This is called Service by Posting.

    If this is not workable, the Petitioner must conduct what is termed a “diligent search” followed by Service by Publication.

    Texas’s Search Requirements and Process

    Texas courts require a good faith effort by the Petitioner to prove that he or she has made a genuine search for his or her missing partner. This search entails:

    • determining whether the missing spouse lives at his or her last known address and checking the post office for a forwarding address.”
    • asking the missing spouse’s friend, relatives and former employers for information about a current address;
    • checking the telephone book and directory assistance in the area where the missing spouse may live;
    • Searching for the missing spouse at these Internet sites:
    • www.addresses.com
    • www.anywho.com
    • www.accurini.com
    • www.infobel.com
    • contacting the Texas Department of Criminal Justice to see if the missing spouse is in prison by calling 512-406-5202 or searching online at www.tdcj,state,tx.us/offendert_information.htm
    • checking military records by contacting https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/appj/scra/scraHome.do

    In order to be eligible for a Texas divorce by Publication, you must complete and submit an Affidavit of Diligent Search to the court. This document clearly outlines all of the actions you have taken to locate your spouse, essentially proving to the court that your spouse absolutely can’t be found.

    If you actively pursue locating your spouse through the methods outlined in the Affidavit of Diligent Search, and still can’t locate your spouse, then a “Divorce by Publication” is your likely method of getting a divorce.

    Filing for Divorce by Publication in Texas

    If the search is fruitless, the Petitioner files an Affidavit for Citation by Publication and Diligent Search, a notarized statement affirming that the Petitioner has “exercised due diligence to locate the Respondent’s residence and have been unable to do so” and with it, a Petitioner’s Supporting Affidavit for Citation by Publication, a notarized statement that catalogues the efforts of the Petitioner to find the missing party. This affidavit also states that the Petitioner attempted personal service on the missing spouse.

    The Petitioner must also file a Certificate of Last Known Address, which states the last known address of the missing spouse.

    The Petitioner must also complete the Service Members Affidavit, which authenticates that the missing spouse is not in the military and does not enjoy any of the protections of the Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act.

    And finally, the Petitioner files a Statement of Evidence, which argues his or her case and requests that “community property and debts of. the marriage be divided as set forth in the Decree of Divorce.

    After the notice is published in the newspaper, an agent of the publication completes and returns a Return of Citation, which authenticates that the notice appeared. The missing spouse can then be considered served.

    The Petitioner then must wait 30 days, which is the time the missing spouse has to answer. After that the Petitioner may file for a hearing date for the divorce, which proceeds as a default.

    A Texas divorce by publication should be considered a last resort. A Respondent served by publication has up to two years to ask for a new trial, and must have an attorney appointed for him or her at the final divorce hearing. The cost of this requirement is borne by the Petitioner.

    From start to finish, Service by Publication takes about three months.

    Texas Service by Publication is described in Texas Rules of Civil Procedure, 99, 106 (a)(1), (a)(2), 106 (b), 109.

    Copyright Notice. These Texas divorce laws above are copyrighted by 3 Step Solutions, LLC. This abbreviated and revised version of the state laws has been compiled from applicable state laws and unauthorized reproduction in any fashion is prohibited. Violation of this copyright notice may result in immediate legal action.



  • 6 Business Icons Who Made TIME Person of the Year #business #invoices


    #business icons

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    TIME has dedicated one issue to the “Person of the Year. ” The award, which is “bestowed to those who have, for good or for ill, most influenced the news and our lives in the past year,” has gone to politicians, scientists, humanitarians and entrepreneurs. Click through to see the business icons who have graced the magazine’s famous cover over the years.

    1928 – Walter Chrysler

    Before starting what would become one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Walter Chrysler worked as a railroad mechanic and locomotive machinist in West Texas. After serving as the head of Buick for three years, Chrysler was tapped to turn around the failing Willys-Overland Motor Company in Flint, Michigan. The now defunct company would become the automaker known today as Chrysler. Two years after being awarded Person of the Year, Chrysler financed the construction of the Chrysler Building in New York City, all with his personal fortune. The building stood as the tallest in the world for 11 months, when the Empire State Building surpassed it. Upon his death in 1938, Chrysler’s estate was worth roughly $8.9 million dollars – almost $150 million by today’s standards.

    1955 – Harlow Curtis

    In 1914, Harlow Curtis, the son of a fruit vendor in rural Michigan, responded to a newspaper ad for a bookkeeper position at the AC Spark Plug Company in Flint, Michigan. Following 15 years of service at AC, Curtis was named president of the spark plug company. According to GM’s online history portal. Curtis worked his way up the Detroit-ranks, landed a position at Buick and eventually became president of the highly profitable GM branch. In 1953, Curtis was named president of General Motors, and at his helm became the first American company to reach $1 billion in profits. A year later, TIME named Curtis “Man of the Year” in recognition of this achievement.

    1991 – Ted Turner

    Now a household name and waiting room fixture nationwide, CNN had plenty of skeptics when Ted Turner launched the first 24-hour news network in 1980. Built on the foundations Turner had put into place as the head of his father’s advertising firm and as the owner of the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, Turner changed news from a once-daily occurrence to a never-ending cycle. As of 2010, CNN was streaming to 100 million American households and another 98 million satellite subscribers throughout the world. Turner is worth $2.2 billion, according to Forbes . making him one of the wealthiest men in the country. The wealthy conglomerate extends beyond media, too. Ted’s Montana Grill serves up western-inspired food sourced from Turner’s bison located on ranches throughout the west and abroad.

    1997 – Andrew Grove

    As he proclaims in his book, “Only the paranoid survive.” This is the driving principle that has made Andrew Grove so insanely successful. Born in Hungary, Grove escaped communism to finish his education, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Grove was a pioneer the burgeoning semi-conductor industry. Once at the helm of Intel, Grove revolutionized the company into the highest valued computer chip maker in the world today. Under Groves leadership, Intel saw an increase in revenue from $1.9 million in 1987 to an astonishing $26.27 billion in 1998. Steve Jobs idolized Grove, seeking his advice when considering a return to Apple as CEO. In 1997, a year before Grove relinquished his title of CEO, Grove was awarded “Person of the Year ” on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the transistor.

    1999 – Jeff Bezos

    The e-commerce pioneer is most well known for his establishment of Amazon as an Internet commerce icon. Originally a source for books, Amazon had expanded to almost everything by 1999 when Jeff Bezos was awarded “Person of the Year.” Born to a teenage mother, Bezos was technologically adept from a young age, tinkering in his parents’ garage. In 2013, Amazon reported net revenue of $74.5 billion and employed over 132,000. Alexa, the domain ranking service, credits Amazon as the seventh most-visited website in the world. Since his recognition, Bezos has been up to quite a bit. In addition to his continued innovations at Amazon (did someone say drones ?), he acquired The Washington Post from longtime owners, the Graham family. Bezos is betting on his knack for web innovation to bring the publication into the digital age.

    2010 – Mark Zuckerberg

    The same year as he was hailed as TIME’s “Person of the Year “, The Social Network film sealed Mark Zuckerberg ‘s place as an American demagogue, next to the likes of Steve Jobs and others. In a Harvard dorm room, Zuckerberg and friends created what would become Facebook. The website spawned an entire social networking industry. Facebook’s massive $5 billion IPO, the third largest in history, would increase Zuckerberg’s wealth to about $33.1 billion, according to Forbes . making him No. 16 on the list of wealthiest Americans. His wealth makes him part of an elite club – one of three people with more billions than they have years of age. As of September, Facebook boasted 864 million daily active users .



    Premises Liability: Who Is Responsible? #accident # # #injury #law, #accidents #and

    Premises Liability: Who Is Responsible?

    When someone enters your property, they have a reasonable expectation of not getting injured. This means that you, as a property owner (or non-owner resident), are responsible for maintaining a relatively safe environment. This is known as premises liability . For example, a courier delivering a package may sue you for injuries if he slips and falls on an oil slick in the driveway. But if that same courier happened to be intoxicated or otherwise acted in an unsafe way, then he may not have a valid claim.

    The legal theory of premises liability holds property owners and residents liable for accidents and injuries that occur on that property. The kinds of incidents that may result in premises liability claims can range from a slip and fall on a public sidewalk to an injury suffered on an amusement park ride.

    Liability is determined by the laws and procedures of the state in which the injury occurred. In some states, the court will focus on the status of the injured visitor in determining liability. In other states, the focus will be on the condition of the property and the activities of both the owner and visitor. It is important to remember that an occupier of land, such as an apartment tenant, is treated in the same manner as a landowner in many situations.

    Legal Status of Visitor: Invitee, Licensee, or Trespasser?

    In states that focus only on the status of the visitor to the property, there are generally four different labels that may apply: invitee, social guest, licensee, or trespasser.

    • An invitee is someone who is invited onto the property of another, such as a customer in a store. This invitation usually implies that the property owner/possessor has taken reasonable steps to assure the safety of the premises.
    • A licensee enters property for his own purpose, or as a social guest, and is present at the consent of the owner.
    • A social guest is just that, a welcome visitor to the property.
    • Finally, a trespasser enters without any right whatsoever to do so. In the case of licensees and trespassers, there is no implied promise that reasonable care has been made to assure the safety of the property.

    Condition of the Property and Actions of the Visitor

    In states where consideration is given to the condition of the property and the activities of the owner and visitor, a uniform standard of care is applied to both invitees and licensees. This uniform standard requires the exercise of reasonable care for the safety of the visitor, other than a trespasser.

    Determining whether the standard of reasonableness required by an owner toward licensees (and in some states, both licensees and invitees) has been met requires an examination of numerous factors including:

    • Circumstances under which the visitor entered the property;
    • Use to which the property is put;
    • Foreseeability of the accident or injury that occurred;
    • Reasonableness of the owner/possessor’s effort to repair a dangerous condition or warn visitors.

    Trespassers on Property

    With respect to trespassers, if the owner knows that it is likely trespassers will enter the property, he or she may be charged with a duty to give reasonable warning to prevent injury. This requirement applies only with respect to artificial conditions that the owner has created or maintains, and knows may be likely to cause serious injury or death.

    Children on Property

    A landowner’s duty to warn is different with respect to children who are not authorized to be on a property. A property owner/possessor must give warning if he or she knows (or should know) that children are likely to be on the premises, and that a dangerous condition on the premises is likely to cause serious bodily injury or death. See Dangers to Children: What is an Attractive Nuisance? to learn more.

    Comparative Fault: When Both Parties are at Fault

    One of the most commonly used limitations on a property owner/possessor’s liability is the argument that the injured person was partially at fault for what happened. A visitor has a duty, in most cases, to exercise reasonable care for his or her own safety. Where that care is not exercised appropriately, the plaintiff’s recovery may be limited or reduced by his or her own negligence.

    Most states adhere to a comparative fault system in personal injury cases, meaning that an injured person’s legal damages will be reduced by a percentage that is equivalent to his or her fault for the incident. So, if it is decided that an injured person was 25% liable for an accident, and the total damages were $10,000, he or she will receive only $7,500.

    Special Rules for Lessors and Landlords

    Special rules of liability may apply in cases of lessors (landlords) of property. The general rule holds that a lessor is not liable to a lessee, or anyone else, for physical harm caused by a condition on the property. This general rule is based partially on the lessor’s presumed lack of control over the property once it is leased, but the rule has numerous important exceptions.

    Get Free Legal Help for a Premises Liability Injury

    If you or a loved one has suffered a premises liability injury, you should speak with an experienced attorney to ensure that your legal rights to compensation are fully assessed and protected. The first step is to contact a lawyer for a free analysis of your claim. with absolutely no obligation. If it is determined that you have a valid claim, many lawyers will work with you on a contingency basis, collecting payment only if you win or settle your case.



    6 Business Icons Who Made TIME Person of the Year #small #business

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    TIME has dedicated one issue to the “Person of the Year. ” The award, which is “bestowed to those who have, for good or for ill, most influenced the news and our lives in the past year,” has gone to politicians, scientists, humanitarians and entrepreneurs. Click through to see the business icons who have graced the magazine’s famous cover over the years.

    1928 – Walter Chrysler

    Before starting what would become one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the United States, Walter Chrysler worked as a railroad mechanic and locomotive machinist in West Texas. After serving as the head of Buick for three years, Chrysler was tapped to turn around the failing Willys-Overland Motor Company in Flint, Michigan. The now defunct company would become the automaker known today as Chrysler. Two years after being awarded Person of the Year, Chrysler financed the construction of the Chrysler Building in New York City, all with his personal fortune. The building stood as the tallest in the world for 11 months, when the Empire State Building surpassed it. Upon his death in 1938, Chrysler’s estate was worth roughly $8.9 million dollars – almost $150 million by today’s standards.

    1955 – Harlow Curtis

    In 1914, Harlow Curtis, the son of a fruit vendor in rural Michigan, responded to a newspaper ad for a bookkeeper position at the AC Spark Plug Company in Flint, Michigan. Following 15 years of service at AC, Curtis was named president of the spark plug company. According to GM’s online history portal. Curtis worked his way up the Detroit-ranks, landed a position at Buick and eventually became president of the highly profitable GM branch. In 1953, Curtis was named president of General Motors, and at his helm became the first American company to reach $1 billion in profits. A year later, TIME named Curtis “Man of the Year” in recognition of this achievement.

    1991 – Ted Turner

    Now a household name and waiting room fixture nationwide, CNN had plenty of skeptics when Ted Turner launched the first 24-hour news network in 1980. Built on the foundations Turner had put into place as the head of his father’s advertising firm and as the owner of the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, Turner changed news from a once-daily occurrence to a never-ending cycle. As of 2010, CNN was streaming to 100 million American households and another 98 million satellite subscribers throughout the world. Turner is worth $2.2 billion, according to Forbes . making him one of the wealthiest men in the country. The wealthy conglomerate extends beyond media, too. Ted’s Montana Grill serves up western-inspired food sourced from Turner’s bison located on ranches throughout the west and abroad.

    1997 – Andrew Grove

    As he proclaims in his book, “Only the paranoid survive.” This is the driving principle that has made Andrew Grove so insanely successful. Born in Hungary, Grove escaped communism to finish his education, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from City College of New York and a Ph. D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Grove was a pioneer the burgeoning semi-conductor industry. Once at the helm of Intel, Grove revolutionized the company into the highest valued computer chip maker in the world today. Under Groves leadership, Intel saw an increase in revenue from $1.9 million in 1987 to an astonishing $26.27 billion in 1998. Steve Jobs idolized Grove, seeking his advice when considering a return to Apple as CEO. In 1997, a year before Grove relinquished his title of CEO, Grove was awarded “Person of the Year ” on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the transistor.

    1999 – Jeff Bezos

    The e-commerce pioneer is most well known for his establishment of Amazon as an Internet commerce icon. Originally a source for books, Amazon had expanded to almost everything by 1999 when Jeff Bezos was awarded “Person of the Year.” Born to a teenage mother, Bezos was technologically adept from a young age, tinkering in his parents’ garage. In 2013, Amazon reported net revenue of $74.5 billion and employed over 132,000. Alexa, the domain ranking service, credits Amazon as the seventh most-visited website in the world. Since his recognition, Bezos has been up to quite a bit. In addition to his continued innovations at Amazon (did someone say drones ?), he acquired The Washington Post from longtime owners, the Graham family. Bezos is betting on his knack for web innovation to bring the publication into the digital age.

    2010 – Mark Zuckerberg

    The same year as he was hailed as TIME’s “Person of the Year “, The Social Network film sealed Mark Zuckerberg ‘s place as an American demagogue, next to the likes of Steve Jobs and others. In a Harvard dorm room, Zuckerberg and friends created what would become Facebook. The website spawned an entire social networking industry. Facebook’s massive $5 billion IPO, the third largest in history, would increase Zuckerberg’s wealth to about $33.1 billion, according to Forbes . making him No. 16 on the list of wealthiest Americans. His wealth makes him part of an elite club – one of three people with more billions than they have years of age. As of September, Facebook boasted 864 million daily active users .



    Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for? #business

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    Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for? Mark Kershaw

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    Business Development – What does it mean? Who is it for?

    Is it the same for everyone?

    Having now worked in a number of roles that you might consider as business development (BD), I thought I’d start my publishing journey on LinkedIn (this is my first post) with a bit of reflection.

    I often get asked what the difference between straight selling and BD is, so I thought I’d try and define the differences (for my own sake, if nothing more!).

    To some degree, they’re different sides of the same coin.

    Selling and BD go hand in hand.

    I’ve been in roles where I’ve been strictly selling, others where there is a combination of sales and BD, and also in roles that I would consider true and pure BD.

    In all, however, I’ve had some link to what would be considered BD within that particular business.

    So the answer to the header title is no, I think; BD is different for everyone and every business, dependent on a number of factors – budget, size of workforce, attitude to BD, etc.

    What is ‘true and pure’ BD?

    The sales process is one that involves a lot of people – product development, designers, pricing, marketing, technical, management – ‘front-line’ salesmen and ‘top-end’ management need to combine forces to deliver a product that their customers want.

    If you walk into a shop to buy a pair of trainers, for example, this has been designed from the early stages by trained footwear designers, manufactured from these designs in a production process of sorts (industrial or bespoke, depending on the brand), marketed in the appropriate manner to raise awareness of the product, eventually landing on the shelves of the shop you’re in, with a friendly guy/gal willing to help you transact some business when you make the decision to buy them.

    So where does BD fit into this process? What’s it all about then?

    I think the foremost word that comes up in the BD world is ‘relationships’.

    That’s pretty much what it’s all about.

    Good business development will help identify, maintain and encourage relationship building within a firm, building rapport with both suppliers and customers.

    It helps strengthen the bonds between these links, supporting the marketing copy and material that establishes your product in the relevant marketplace.

    It helps provide information as to what the client needs to the ‘front line’ sales team, assisting them in closing the deal at the end of the process.

    It helps inform management as to how the market is moving, providing insights into new developments of technology, social media and other digital avenues that the firm can take advantage of, to build and maintain loyalty.

    It helps small companies access bigger markets and large companies engage newcomers.

    So my definition of ‘true and pure’ BD is ‘helping a business to develop its relationships’.

    Plain and simple.

    It’s networking on a daily basis; attending cutting-edge events to learn about the industry you’re working in; finding (er. stalking?) people on LinkedIn to see what events they’re attending and making sure you meet them there, in person, so that you can have that all important introductory chat; it’s offering your loyal customers something more than a newsletter – why not run a seminar and invite them along to it? They might be happy to be invited.

    The personal touch is always a winner.

    We hear more and more now about relationships marketing, social currency, engagement, etc.

    BD is the platform that most of this is built on.

    As I’ve mentioned before, I’ve worked in roles that have been classed as BD but have really been sales. I’ve worked in hybrid roles where you might do a bit of both. And I’ve worked in the ‘true and pure’ BD roles to.

    What this has shown me is that BD has a place in every business. You can’t ‘develop’ your business without a good BD strategy.

    So whether you’re encouraging your front-line staff to sign up to a few newsletters, or get yourself down to a few networking events, or join a LinkedIn group and start up a discussion, BD is something that can’t be overlooked.

    It’s all very well to have a great product and a nicely designed website, with some great leaflets and a slick business card but, without the right approach to BD, no one is going to see it in the way you want to.

    Having worked as a supplier to a lot of startups and growing SMEs, the one thing that I’ve noticed which has set apart the successes from the failures is their approach to BD.

    Develop the relationships – build a community around your business and your product just needs to do what it says on the tin. The rest will fall into place and you’ll have a strong, loyal customer base who are happy to sing your praises.

    For that reason alone, if nothing else, BD is essential for pretty much any business going.

    That’s my opinion anyway, although I may be a bit bias, of course.